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Jenna and Jeremy, from Quench Your Adventure, Are Husband and Wife Entrepreneurs Who Sold Everything, Bought an RV, and are Living the Digital Nomad Life | Ep. 49 - Special Edition Half Moon Bay Business Podcast

Jenna and Jeremy, from Quench Your Adventure, Are Husband and Wife Entrepreneurs Who Sold Everything, Bought an RV, and are Living the Digital Nomad Life | Ep. 49 – Special Edition Half Moon Bay Business Podcast

Jenna and Jeremy, from Quench Your Adventure, Are Husband and Wife Entrepreneurs Who Sold Everything, Bought an RV, and are Living the Digital Nomad Life | Ep. 49 – Special Edition Half Moon Bay Business Podcast

Jenna and Jeremy, from Quench Your Adventure, Are Husband and Wife Entrepreneurs Who Sold Everything, Bought an RV, and are Living the Digital Nomad Life
Jenna and Jeremy, from Quench Your Adventure, Are Husband and Wife Entrepreneurs Who Sold Everything, Bought an RV, and are Living the Digital Nomad Life

Summary

Jenna and Jeremy Chipps share how they found the courage to sell everything, buy an RV, start a travel blog, and live the digital nomad life.

We talk about what it’s been like, how they approach their Quench Your Adventure media business, how they keep up with social media posts, come up with content ideas, how they grew their Instagram followers, how they are building their You Tube channel and how living in an RV has impacted their relationship. 

This episode is packed with HPT’s (high percentage tips) to help you grow your business, improve your online marketing and you’ll love them both.

Find Jenna and Jeremy on their Quench Your Adventure Blog and on Instagram @QuenchYourAdventure

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Hello, friends. 

Brandon: 

Welcome to another episode. Throw the business success Secrets. I am your host, Brandon. See, White. And today we have Jeremy and Jenna, who are digital nomads in a new world. They decided that they were going to terminate their lease by an RV, work remotely and travel around the country. 

Brandon: 

And you’re gonna learn how it’s happening for him. 

Brandon: 

And they built a little side hustle called Quench Your Adventure. They’ve got a really big following on instagram where they drop some H P T s and the conversations Pretty fun because we cover everything from how you decide to quit your lease by an RV and travel and work remotely to how to actually hold down a job while you’re traveling and everything else from relationship tips, marriage tips, business tips, social media tips and how to grow your INSTAGRAM account. 

Brandon: 

It’s all here. 

Brandon: 

Let’s not waste another second. Jenna and Jeremy from quench your adventure, Jeremy and General. 

Brandon: 

Welcome. Thanks for joining us from your RV today. We How long we known each other over a year? Yeah, we just got a year, a little over a year. And when I first met you, you were actually living in a house you were thinking about how you were going to build a new business and you decided Thio because I follow you on instagram and with talk is you ditched everything and bought an RV. 

Brandon: 

Yeah, No cars, no house, no stuff, nothing. 

Brandon: 

We literally live in this RV and everything inside is all we have. What was the original? 

Jenna: 

And I apologize because you guys have, like, it’s hard to even keep track of where you are. 

Brandon: 

What was the original business that you both set out that even brought you to be in the student, right? 

Jenna: 

That’s how I met you is how did that even What was the original idea? 

Brandon: 

Yeah, there’s been so many ideas. 

Brandon: 

I guess the original may have been an app. 

Jeremy: 

We talked about developing a travel app that helps people get to and from and what to do and where to go. 

Jeremy: 

Kind of like blogging, itinerary writing, But all in one place where you click one state, one city, one country and it brings you up whatever you want. 

Jenna: 

I could still be a business, so we don’t want to say way. 

Jenna: 

Haven’t talked about that in a long time. But it was that came after the same time that I decided to, like, create a name, create a brand and start sharing just images from our travels to try to inspire people to go, you know, quench their adventure. Hence our names. So, yeah, hopefully that kind of answers the question. 

Jeremy: 

Yes. So what was the app? And then it was a travel guide in a nap. But did what? What deterred? You were made. You change the direction. Was that the cost? I remember I gave you some advice and basically said, You shouldn’t build the app. I think it’s going to cost too much money. I think it’s gonna be a pain in the butt upkeep and do something lower. But what was it that you just Did you just lose interest Or was it the money or what was it? 

Brandon: 

Yeah, I guess cost was a huge factor. But also, like, I still don’t really have a great articulation of like what we’re good at. You know, I feel like that’s a huge part of building a business is just really getting locked in on what exactly you are good at and We’re still figuring that, like it says that photography Is it writing? 

Jeremy: 

Is it exposure? Is it explaining and forming? Educating, showing. What is it? What are we good? And that is what we’re finding out. What’s our niche? What are we really good as a couple? As separately, How can we help everybody? So here’s a Here’s a question because I’ve always seen you both together all the time. 

Jenna: 

But when I read the website, it sounds like Jeremy. This was your hair brained idea that you came up with, and then you drag Jenna into it. But the thing about it is that is that I see Jenna creating all the content all the time, which is you, like a good gig, and you ride your bike by and I I and I see you exercising and stuff. So how it like was just just I mean, General, you’re obviously onboard now. But how did that work? I think it’s important because one of the things that you both know is, I think too much too many times in an entrepreneurship or an entrepreneur journey. We always talk about the entrepreneur. In this case, I see you both this entrepreneurs. But what we free and everybody talks about the team, right? And then you’re like, Oh, my team when we were talking before Oh, I have a video person Have any I have this and that But really, my team is my wife and family because that ultimately is if you don’t have that team on board, it just won’t matter what happens because your personal life will probably go to hell. 

Brandon: 

So how did that develop with both of you? 

Jenna: 

We’ll definitely you’re right. 

Brandon: 

It was Jeremy’s idea and Jeremy’s. I don’t want to say dream or you know his thing. But he started really honing in on, like, Let’s create this instagram and let’s create guides and let’s create photography and drone and footage and GoPro and really show what we can dio to help others. And I’m just like, yeah, sure, like as a hobby, like Sure, if you want to change your Instagram name from Jeremy Chips to Jeremy’s Journeys and then change its adventure adventure, sure, let’s do it. And then he really explained to me like, this isn’t just a brand. This is a lifestyle like this is like who we are like we can’t just talk the talk and, you know, here, Post a photo of two years ago, and yeah, we travel no. Like we need to be out next. Flooring, trying new foods, being locals, being the hidden gems. And so eventually I was like, This is kind of fun. I could do this lifestyle. 

Jenna: 

There were a good, I don’t know, maybe 3 to 6 months where I would be sitting in the green chair in the corner of our bedroom, writing an instagram caption for like, an hour. And Jenna’s waiting for me. Thio going a walk or go to the gym or whatever and like, what are you doing? But eventually she became the one writing those captions. I maybe do a little bit more. Sorry about that. One of our alarms going off in the in the army. I guess we need new batteries. But but yeah, Jenna really jumped on board and got genuinely excited about creating content and, you know, living this adventure. 

Jeremy: 

So the idea was you were going to have some adventure life, documented it and somehow make some money at some point. 

Brandon: 

Yeah, I don’t know if money was in the very beginning. It was showing photos, writing captions, engaging with people. And then we realized as it grew bigger, bigger. We’re like, Okay, if we’re spending so much time in this, we should be either, you know, compensated or recognized or somewhat feeling like we’re not just drowning in it. So yeah, so, Jeremy, But I’m gonna go back to this. 

Jenna: 

What would if it wasn’t money? Was it you just like you wanted to be popular on Instagram? I No, I’m saying that off the cuff was it because, like, what was it that drove you to want to share the adventures that you know? 

Brandon: 

What was that? 

Brandon: 

Why mhm. Yeah, I think for me, it’s there are few things that I’m very opinionated about. But one thing that I can’t stand is when people like, do the same things that aren’t fulfilling them. So when people are, you know, too afraid to take a trip that they really want Thio or, you know, they waste away years of their lives sitting on the couch, watching TV, you know, whatever. And if that’s your lifestyle and your cool it, then fair enough. But I really wanted to inspire people Thio live differently. To go on some kind of adventure, big or small, go to the next town over that you’ve never really explored before and go into the new restaurant lockup Park. You know, something like that, so I can attest to that He is. 

Jeremy: 

It’s very authentic coming from him like it is truly like I like That’s all he wanted. I just want to show people that there is so much more out there and you could do anything If you just step outside your door, it doesn’t have to be skydiving or zip lining. It could literally be where he just said a casual new thing for sure. 

Jenna: 

What do you think? 

Jeremy: 

What do you think drives you to have that visual reaction to people who just don’t follow that? 

Jenna: 

Do you think that’s something? Actually, you know, the psychologist in the would come out here and say potentially that maybe that was something in yourself that you wanted to prove to yourself that you’re not going to just stay in North Carolina or you’re just not going to stay in Florida. 

Brandon: 

That life is bigger than that, And that was a motivation, really. In you by expressing it to other people. And it makes you mad because you don’t want to do that to yourself for sure. 

Brandon: 

Yeah, that that could be it. I definitely have kind of, ah, wild spirit and have to figure out ways Thio let it run wild. I guess you could say so. Yeah, like, that’s a pretty good analysis. 

Jeremy: 

And maybe Jenna, that’s what you found attracted. 

Brandon: 

E don’t know. Sometimes if I’m gonna be completely honest, it can be a little worrisome that I’ve expressed to him in our relations to that ship that sometimes it feels like it’s never enough when it comes to travel adventure outdoors. Nature like it’s okay. We went out three times today. We did fives, bike rides to rock climbs. It’s OK. Is it enough? Can we lay down? Can we watch movie? So I think we balance each other out very, very well. We’ve both have this adventurous spirit, but we both know how to kind of bring it back to a common ground. So I don’t think that is what initially attracted me. To be honest, I just liked who he was as a person in his character and then he’s just really fun. And so that helped. 

Jenna: 

But, uh, and people listen and be like whole Brandon is a little weird. But are you? Ah, Capricorn, er, Sagittarius. 

Brandon: 

No, Neither of us are. 

Jenna: 

I am a cancer July and Jeremy is a Virgo September, and we actually took a test that we’re really compatible. 

Jenna: 

Well, that’s really good. Here, here’s a Here’s a I think it’s you both balance each other. I don’t know what compatible means. My wife and I are actually exactly the opposite, but it seems to work out for both of you. It clearly it clearly works out. But Jenna, it would be it would be fair to say, from my observations of when you initially well, maybe you could talk about this. 

Brandon: 

Like, when did you either Jeremy convinced Jenna that you’re going to ditch the house or like, how did that? How did this whole idea of Hey, we’re gonna buy an RV and travel around? 

Brandon: 

E was actually my idea. 

Brandon: 

Was it really like Jeremy might have all this adventurous side with it comes to the outdoors, but I was the one saying, Let’s get get rid of it all like Let’s be minimalist. 

Jenna: 

He showed me a documentary on Netflix one time and I can’t unsee what I saw. 

Brandon: 

Like I’m obsessed with downsizing with living with what you need, not what you want. And I laid down one night before bed. It was in the very beginning, stages of pandemic as it was ending and things were opening up. I said, We have a van. Let’s convert it and let’s go travel and write itineraries. He’s like, OK, yeah, good idea. Like, Wow, you’re on board. Good job. Why? And then we got back from that and I was like, I’m not done. This isn’t I don’t wanna be stock. I’m feeling stuck now. He was finally fine. And I said, Would you sell it all like, should we just get rid of everything? 

Jenna: 

We have all this random stuff from college? Nothing matches with furniture. We’ll just buy it all again. 

Jenna: 

And before we even bought the RV, we gave up our lease. We had no home like we were like, If we don’t buy an RV, we have to buy an RV like we don’t the whole Yeah, there’s no better way to set a deadline than to not renew your lease. 

Jenna: 

Eso But I need to ask this because I think that’s really interesting. 

Jenna: 

Because when I was watching your instagram stories, Jenna and you were traveling around in that van, I gotta tell you that Jeremy looks super excited. 

Jeremy: 

And you looked really sad about not washing your hair, not having a bathroom in the van. And it sounded like you were may be having second thoughts there, but I’m sure there were some moments you guys weren’t pretty far in just a man, didn’t you To test this idea out. 

Brandon: 

Oh, my gosh. Way up to state of Maine, I think in total, about 40 nights on the one long consecutive trip was almost three weeks. 

Jenna: 

So we spent some time something. 

Jeremy: 

Yeah, but I will say we had I did have non negotiables going into purchasing a home on wheels, and it was exactly what you just said. Faster kitchen sink, toilet flushing. 

Jenna: 

What better way to make RV life look attractive than to live in a tiny van for over? 

Jeremy: 

Yeah, maybe it was like a psychological trick, because I’m like, Hey, this is lab Got three times the square feet. 

Jenna: 

We got a full bath. 

Jeremy: 

I can sit up and stand up. I can teach my classes like I can’t teach a class in a bed hunched over a van. 

Jenna: 

Uh, so let’s talk about that. You both actually have full time jobs, right? 

Brandon: 

Yeah, I have three part time, and then Jeremy is full time. 

Jenna: 

So how how’s that? Well, how’s that been working out? Because sometimes being on the move is really exciting. The thing that I found the hardest, if anything, is just Internet access. 

Brandon: 

Oh, yeah, yeah, yeah. It’s, um it’s been difficult. 

Jeremy: 

So I’ve got I’ve got a full time sales job. I’m working virtually. I’m making sales calls. So, yeah, I need decent service and decent Internet, and most of the time, that’s not that hard to find, you know, in the States. But we were definitely in places where service gets spotty because we love spending time in the mountains. And there’s not always cell towers everywhere. So we do have unlimited data and mobile hotspots, but we’re learning now that those will run out if you’re actually working, like 40 hours, you know, using Internet. Yeah, I think we have, like, 15 gigs each on our mobile hotspot that you know will connect to with our laptops. So we actually just purchased another hotspot device that apparently connects with all the cell towers with different carriers and whatnot. We haven’t even started to use it yet, but it is a need now, and being on the move and trying to work is stressful. And I’m now I’ve taken on a second job to potentially transition to this second job, which will be fully remote, you know, permanently and potentially leaving the other one so a lot going on. 

Jeremy: 

So what day is this? Another sales job? 

Brandon: 

It is but a much more exciting sales job. You know, not Thio. Talk down about the job I’ve had for the last three plus years because it’s great. It’s in the pharmaceutical industry. But this new job, I would be selling sponsorship packages to big outdoor brands, which is way closer to what I actually enjoy doing. It’s for a company called the Outdoor Journal, so it couldn’t be a better fit as far as you know, the people, the culture and what they’re into. So we’ll see. But it’s it’s a small startup. It’s commission on Lee, so there’s some some risk committing that’s just three plus years. So we’re figuring it out. It’s the reason we’re back to North Carolina as we had some responsibilities with that job that, you know, brought us back when we thought we potentially be on the road. I’ll say for through the end of the year, and I’m totally virtual again. It’s kind of back and forth, too much to explain. But anyway, it’s the reason we’re back in North Carolina now, so I’d be remiss without asking this question. 

Jeremy: 

You’re going to sell outdoor packages for an adventure journal or website or whatever it is, which sounds super exciting. 

Brandon: 

Why wouldn’t you just send all sponsorship packages for yourself? Because you’re living the life and and you’d be wasting your time. I don’t mean wasting your time. I’m sure it’s a very, very good journal. I don’t even know what it is. I’m pointing to like my screen. But why? Why, why wouldn’t you do that? 

Brandon: 

We I guess the main reason is just audience and exposure. The outdoor journal has a much larger audience than we dio. We’ve done plenty of, you know, small scale brand work and, you know, sponsorships. I guess you could call them with quencher adventure, where we’ll get free stuff or a small payment for something mostly credits agenda, reaching out to brands and stuff. And that’s great. But it just seems like a huge risk with that, really pay the bills. Maybe one day that’s the goal, but I don’t know. It’s a good question. 

Jeremy: 

I don’t know for their yet, and I feel like our mom and dad would be so mad. 

Jenna: 

Eso isn’t, isn’t it? So there in lies, maybe the real truth, because my guess I think we we did this a while ago when when I said, Hey, what is your burn rate? Right? That’s always my question is not your business Burn rate. What is your personal burn rate? 

Brandon: 

It’s hard for me to believe that you both of your burn rate, is that high living in the RV. 

Jenna: 

So I mean, I can tell you it right now what it used to be, what it is. 

Brandon: 

It’s pretty. 

Brandon: 

Do you share that information because you did do a bunch of math on your instagram? 

Jenna: 

So what does it really cost you to live in that RV right now. 

Brandon: 

We’re actually, like, trying to get good, clear numbers on that right now, because that’s our next YouTube video. But there are some factors that maybe make these last few months potential outliers if we eventually have enough data to do you know, Anania a while, you know, and then take months. But anyway, it looks like our burn rate could be around $2000 $1000 total if I’m not yet, including all of the extras which make the calculation a little more tricky, like, you know, buying things for the RV when you’re unsure how often you may need to buy those things. 

Jeremy: 

Because the budget, the monthly spending that is normal every month is very low. 

Brandon: 

But in the month of September, we spent like $3500 I think because it took us a long time to get back. 

Jeremy: 

Yeah, but also also, you had some mistakes. 

Jenna: 

I followed your instagram and you were counting $800 for food when it really wasn’t $800 for food, right? 

Jeremy: 

Yeah. 

Jenna: 

And then a huge variable this gas, because we true across the country and ended up driving back. 

Brandon: 

But It s so let’s just talk about this. 

Jeremy: 

Let’s just and being a fellow RV owner, guaranteed if there’s anybody listening and I know you both attest to this RVs break like you are going to have repairs every month. 

Jenna: 

You should not put in your budget that you will have no repair. 

Brandon: 

A tube will go out, your tank will crack. Keep going down the list it Z, but it’s not. It’s not $100,000 expense. It’s $300.200 dollars, your water pump. If you’re going to use that stuff every day, it’s and you’re not going to do hookups, then you’re gonna rely on that. So even if it was $3000.3000 times 10 30 right, so $36,000 a year you’re living on $36,000 a year, so I just go back to it. 

Brandon: 

Seems riskier for you, toe not sell sponsorships than to do it. 

Brandon: 

You’re gonna get in trouble with our parents. 

Brandon: 

I’m happy to actually talk to your parents because I mean right, Detective No, e I. 

Jenna: 

I asked Jeremy that I said when he agreed to this job, I said Jeremy you realize what you’re about to start doing is what I do. 

Brandon: 

It’s what I dio. It’s what we dio. Every day I contact and I reach out and I get sponsors and we get collapse like but on a smaller scale. 

Jenna: 

But who says that can’t get bigger? 

Jeremy: 

So I think we just need to solidify what I’m doing with my part time work, Making sure that I’m ramping up and making my my goal is to make what we spend and his will be extra. 

Jenna: 

So I need to make how much we spend a month in a month. 

Jenna: 

Well, you know, that’s why I get paid the big bucks to host this Webcast. 

Jenna: 

Our Webcast podcast is toe as asking hard questions, but I might have a little experience getting sponsorships for an outdoor website and maybe a testament that it actually does work. It does work, and it it’s not easy, and the outdoor segment is. His interest is is interesting in that the brands that we, as outdoor enthusiasts believe spend a lot of money. Actually, don’t. But you can make money on other other things and like that, So if your parents are listening and to have any problem, feel free to pass on my contact information. And, uh, and I will tell them that I’m committed to have committed to helping you make it true. But at the same token, the outdoor channel. Probably instantly where the outdoor channel, the outdoor magazine, will open doors to you very quickly to give you credibility. So but I think it’s awesome for 36,000 bucks a year. I mean, holy smokes, right? And you guys were living a good life because I’m watching your instagram stories and you’ve been all over the place. I was wondering you did stay in some really nice hotels, but but those we’re not didn’t really cost you anything, did they? 

Brandon: 

Yeah, those didn’t cost is anything. Yeah, thanks to our brand. And thanks to Jennifer for reaching out, it’s not even going to be honest. 

Jeremy: 

You know, you call you email 25 25 restaurants, 25 hotels and you get 12345 responses or you get knows where you get no response. Eso itt’s school and I’m I’m grateful for it, but it’s not like, Hey, what can you give us? It’s a very specific template that I used to be very critical. Like critique it very hard to make it appropriate to them. 

Jenna: 

So do you. Do you have a media package that you tell them? Like, Hey, we’re going to do five instagram stories. We’re gonna dio YouTube spot, and we’re gonna do a block post. 

Brandon: 

Similar. We never number. How many? I will say that. It’s very vague stories, permanent posts, you know, shout outs. Blawg mentioned. I never want to put like we will give you five stories, So I keep a very vague and a lot of the times like one of the hotel deals was like I said, one night stay. They go. We can get you two nights stay in a $50 gift card to our restaurant, so Okay, fine by me. 

Jenna: 

So how long have you been in the RV? 

Jenna: 

Now? 

Brandon: 

Just over two months now. 

Jeremy: 

And what’s your third? 

Brandon: 

September 3rd is when we left. 

Jenna: 

And what’s your assessment to date like? Are you missing your apartment? Are you? 

Brandon: 

No. I mean, I guess the perspective over the last week is slightly different because we’re back in North Carolina. There’s a few added stresses that weren’t there when we were, you know, on the road we’ve stayed in these nice hotels, and we’re now actually house sitting for some friends. So having extra space is very nice. And, you know, in some ways, you’re like, uh, you know, this This was nice, but what did we say before bed last night? 

Jeremy: 

Yeah, that we’d rather we And we like our house. 

Jenna: 

Our like our bed, our pillows, our space, our comfort. 

Jeremy: 

This is our home now. This is where all our stuff this is going home is just being here wherever we are. 

Jenna: 

And we’re great with that for now. I mean, you know, so things were good. 

Jeremy: 

So you guys have been dry camping, It looks like because I see, like you have not been doing any hookups, right? 

Brandon: 

It is day. What day is it? Two months in almost 2.5 months in, and we have not hooked up for going to a campground was spent and nightly cost anywhere. We’re very lucky we had fun. 

Jenna: 

Fact, though we did stay at night, hooked up at Camping World in South Dakota, which was kind of cool because apparently some of them are okay with that. 

Jeremy: 

And they have spots you can pull up and, you know, do whatever you need, Thio. As long as you wait for free. I mean, you know, we ended up also spending money there, so yeah, it works for them. 

Jeremy: 

We spent, like, a couple 100 bucks inside, but they were forcing us to do that. 

Jenna: 

But anyway, other than that, yeah, we’re totally dry camping. We just fill up wherever we can, and and we don’t really need a whole lot for power. Although we are considering getting solar panels in the future, So we’ll see the couple. 

Jeremy: 

We bought the RV from when we were talking to them. They kind of seemed like in disbelief because Jeremy kept saying, Oh, we’re never going to stay in a campground. We’re never going to say I can’t crumble, stay wherever we want. And they were like, Yeah, that’s probably not gonna happen. We stayed in the background every night and surprisingly on, and I doubted it as well. I said Jeremy was safety with Cove in with water with a C gas. Whatever. Electric wife, it’s not gonna happen. We’re gonna have to stay at least a couple days a week. 

Jenna: 

It’s been fine. So basically between I guess Open Places, Sam Walton’s free Walmart Parking and Marcus Lemonis sales Great marketing effort to give you free hookup. You basically really paid nothing. 

Brandon: 

Yeah, just a couple of times we had to pay to dump, but most of the time were able to find places for free for that as well. I mean, yeah, it’s I mean, it’s still still hard to find. But the gas stations we found a few rest stops. You’d be surprised to have some way Did have one campground. I just like, rolled up and asked the guy, Who can we fill up our water tank? And he said, Sure, which was really cool. 

Jeremy: 

Yeah, a lot of campgrounds also don’t realize if you are or aren’t staying there as guests, and then they’ll have, like, a little tip jar, like we’ve always just left tips or bought something inside just to be respectful. Yeah, but you know, there’s compendium in national parks as well. 

Jenna: 

I think Yellowstone we dumped Yeah, so, you know, they have Custer State Park in South Dakota, so, you know, it’s not like there every corner, but we found places. 

Jeremy: 

I think in total, we’ve only spent $18 to dump and Philip are water every other time. 

Jenna: 

It’s, you know, we managed to find a place. 

Jeremy: 

Well, that’s incredible. So one thing we didn’t I just realized How big is your RV question? 

Brandon: 

We thought it was 24 ft when we bought it. They told us that is 25.9. 

Jenna: 

I think so, Yeah, I think because we did actually mention class seat. 

Jeremy: 

So there’s no it’s like, Got the cab out front. 

Jenna: 

Yeah, it drives itself, but about 25 a half 4 ft, something like That’s about 11.5 ft tall, about 10 ft wide. 

Jeremy: 

You have a slide out from the mirror. 

Brandon: 

I wanted a slide out brand and really badly, and I’m okay with not having it. 

Jeremy: 

Yeah, for now, if we had dogs and kids. 

Jenna: 

Yeah, well, the math on square footage, I think it’s something like 144 square feet. But you know, actual floor space, of course, is much less than that. 

Jeremy: 

Yeah, the eventually you’ll you’ll like the slide out. I will say it gives you and and if we didn’t have dogs, it wouldn’t be an issue like both of you. But with a With dogs, it definitely helps. Now. How many gallons of fresh water and black and gray water stores do you have? 

Brandon: 

Yeah, so the specs say the freshwater tank is, I think, either 50 or 55 gallons, So that’s sizeable. I wish the great tank was larger because that’s the thing that every single time, you know, we need to dump first. It’s only, I think, 28 gallons and then the black tank. We could go for much longer without having to dump that, because it’s also 28 gallons and you know it doesn’t fill up nearly as quickly, so it depends on the week. But we could go for maybe, maybe five days, potentially without having toe, you know, dump or fill up or anything, and you have a generator we dio that’s been helpful. 

Jeremy: 

Yeah, the couple that owned it before us, they almost never used it since they were always in campgrounds would only had, like, 40 some hours on it, which apparently, these things go for, you know, thousands and thousands. 

Brandon: 

And I think we now only have just over 100 because we did the math. 

Jenna: 

On average, we use it maybe 1 to 2 hours a day just to get stuff charged up. And then we do drain, not drain, but use like the car battery. A decent amount to charge devices, which maybe that’ll shorten the lifespan of that battery. But so what? You know, we’ll buy another one. It’s our house, So but still thinking about solar panels in the future because it was just make things a little easier, quieter, more consistent, you know? 

Jeremy: 

So the do you have batteries for the designated batteries for the generator to It runs off the gas in the gas tank. 

Brandon: 

It runs off the gas. 

Jeremy: 

But then does it charge is you have a house, batteries to house batteries. So you have three battery than yeah. 

Brandon: 

Yeah, yeah. So to ask batteries? Yeah, and then the car battery and you’re not Wow, You guys are good because we seem to use generator all the time, and we have thousands of probably thousands of hours on our SB. 

Jeremy: 

You haven’t needed it. Like, what are you doing for heat and air conditioning? 

Brandon: 

E I mean, it’s, you know, it’s been fall, so we haven’t really had much need for a C. There’s been a few hot days where we’ll just have all the vents open in the family outside most of the time. 

Jeremy: 

Honestly, like even if we’re working and doing stuff, we’re at a picnic table or on our camping chairs or at, like, a cafe like were never in it except at night. And it’s cold. So then we’ll use the furnace. But other than that and in total, over the last two months, we’ve spent way, haven’t used the icy, but we’ve spent, I think, about 80 to $90 in propane, and that runs our furnace. 

Jenna: 

And we’ve had a lot of cold nights, though, in South Dakota and Wyoming. 

Jeremy: 

Yeah, and then you need the battery just to do the fan. But the gas is is doing the heat effectively. So if you have a gas, yeah, or do you have an electric heater? Propane on the furnace is doing the heat. I think in ours it’s all electric on the heat. The propane furnace does the stove and the hot water. 

Brandon: 

Yeah, it does that for us. as well. But yeah, it’s pretty efficient and it heats the thing up quick if we wanted to know for sure. 

Jeremy: 

So, General, what are your? 

Brandon: 

You know, you mentioned these three jobs. 

Jenna: 

I know one of them is teaching. I didn’t know that you have these other two jobs. 

Brandon: 

How’s that? How’s that working remotely teaching for one, I would think. I mean, the Internet obviously, is a huge issue, right? 

Brandon: 

Luckily, I pick my own hours and schedules. So, like I’m like, Jeremy, we need to be here at this time. I have a class we have to have WiFi or we have to be in a connected service area where I can use my own LTTE or hot spot. There has been trouble with Jeremy being on a work call, I being in a class teaching and it’s raining outside. So no one’s going outside and I have to go to the very front. He has to go to the very back. There are no doors and there are no curtains. This is it. It’s one big open space. Luckily, that has only happened somehow once. 

Jenna: 

What I But I’m not surprised because I choose when to take the class or teach it. And I know not to book class when he has a call. So that’s interesting, But yeah, I work with kids all over the country, from Kuwait, from Cincinnati, from New Jersey, from Europe, Iceland all over the place. It’s really It’s a really cool platform called out school. And I’ve been a teacher the last 3.5 years in the classroom. But this was the year I did not go back, so that was really cool. 

Jenna: 

And then I just got a remote job permanently working for a company in New York called Lion Global. It’s a marketing agency, and I’m actually running their social media. 

Jenna: 

Oh, that’s is a You created a digital marketing agency out of the RV. 

Brandon: 

Yeah, yeah, yeah. So I basically worked for Tom Lion out in New York, and I do his Instagram Facebooks and Twitter, LinkedIn and content creating social media, manage. 

Jenna: 

And then I guess when I said I have three jobs I might quench. 

Brandon: 

Your adventure is my started. 

Jenna: 

So? So here’s a question. 

Brandon: 

How long you been married? Now? 

Jenna: 

Good for you. Congratulations on that. Because most people and I always make it that far. So, uh, how how has this in my experience? Many times when you get into a closer area, it can. It can change your relationship because you’re in very close quarters. Or how How has that dynamic? Um, if they get from that laughter been going reasonably well. 

Brandon: 

Yeah. In the beginning, I was like, This is so easy. It’s so okay. This was almost wrote an instagram post saying, Wow, living in such tight spaces makes you appreciate your partner more because you see these things they do for you, the dishes, the cleaning, that this that the other I almost posted that. And then it was the next day we had a big old fight and I was like, That’s a hypocrite. I can’t say that just it was, too. It’s sometimes clustering or claustrophobic E where it’s just like I love you so much. But like you’re always next to me, no matter where. 

Jenna: 

Well, the quarantine, I guess that was ah pro is There was a nice transition because we were both home together all the time for a good few months. 

Jeremy: 

I’m sure other couples have experienced this either ever. All families have experienced just a closeness, which can be good. 

Jenna: 

Thank you, be stressful, but I definitely, I think, still leaving room for personal space. 

Jenna: 

Still, doing your own thing is important. So there’s plenty of times where I might be all the way up in the, you know, drivers seat just on my phone, whatever. And I like to ride my bike and go outside and sometimes do those things by myself. A. And that’s nice. We value that. 

Jeremy: 

We don’t get offended like I’m very open with Jeremy and I said, I need my time. I need my space, I’m going, I’m leaving. But in a positive, friendly way He’s very were both open to being like Listen, it’s too much right now. I got to take a break, especially when you’re working on a brand and a company together. It’s like, Oh, my gosh, when do we have us time? It has nothing to do with our business. It’s just us. 

Jenna: 

Yeah, I would ah, 100% agree. My wife during the quarantine has basically used. I used to be able to ask questions up to 11 a.m. Now I am back toe like 10 or 9 30. 

Brandon: 

So things do change and much of a call it when you get when you get closer. 

Brandon: 

We managed. I forget. I think we’ve been together 24 years. 

Brandon: 

But how? Maney marriage years for you. 

Jenna: 

We’ve been together for 24 years, I think. And we’ve been hurt or 14. 

Brandon: 

Maybe I’m okay. Wow. Yeah. So I don’t know if that qualifies me an expert. It certainly had a lot of experience, but, uh and we just didn’t get married because we didn’t have kids. So for us and we’re very independent. But I think your advice, Jeremy engine is very good in that. I believe after all these years, the success to any relationship is that a relationship is an existing to your already existing life. And if your life is going to depend on your partner for everything, then in my experience and observation, that generally doesn’t work certainly can work in the short term, but it’s not gonna work in the long term. 

Brandon: 

So I think it sounds like you guys have some good. 

Brandon: 

You have a very good relationship. And not getting offended is probably key. 

Brandon: 

I think Jenna and Jeremy cut me off because any relationship ends, You know? 

Brandon: 

Now I got you. 

Brandon: 

Yeah. 

Brandon: 

Hey, hey, hey, hey. 

Jeremy: 

This is all this is part, you know? 

Jenna: 

I like I like to keep it real, man. This is, uh if you’re gonna have Ah, If you’re gonna try to do a podcast with somebody who lives in RV, you’re gonna experience things so well. I don’t know how much you got of that, but I was saying that I think it’s really good to be open. And look, you know, the bottom line is humans aren’t perfect, so you’re gonna sometimes take it personally or whatever, but I think having open lines of communication and understanding who each other are and that you need space, I definitely my wife and I both that way. A general when you were talking, I think Onley people who have been married for three plus years. 

Brandon: 

I’ll give you three. I think three years you’re starting Teoh is like I look back three years. I started to figure out what was really going on. But it’s one of those things where you can love someone incredibly, but they’re getting on your nerves like nobody you’ve ever met at the exact same time. 

Brandon: 

Thanks is so funny. 

Brandon: 

Yeah, we’re not perfect. 

Jenna: 

He just did this to me earlier Branded. 

Jeremy: 

This is exactly what just went on. 

Jenna: 

What went on. 

Brandon: 

Like he said, Can you please just leave the room? You’re being too annoying a sign of work. I’m just in their singing, bouncing on a yoga ball like talking to the cash is I Can you please e just There’s some overwhelm going on with these different job responsibilities, trying to figure out how to spend my time. 

Jenna: 

So I’d love to spend more time with Jenna. But when I’m trying to work and she council out of all next three, it is admittedly distracted. 

Jeremy: 

But I think I think a key thing here about relationships is, is is just the communication. 

Brandon: 

And I don’t think most people have the courage to communicate and say that, right, Jeremy, like it’s not. 

Brandon: 

It’s not easy. 

Brandon: 

It’s not like, Oh, hey, you’re getting on my nerves. 

Jenna: 

I got work to do. I mean my preference. As much as I love my work, what would be to hang out with Yvette and do some fun stuff, as I’m sure with you But if you want to pay the gas, pay the mortgage and do all these other things. But I think it’s better and you guys can tell me what you think. I think it’s better to communicate it than to the nasty, which is sometimes what happens. And then the other person makes up this story in their head, and now your relationship starts not like throwing out the door. But now you’re in this weird place that you have to repair. And the person who said it doesn’t understand that this story is basically getting out of control in the other person’s head. And now you’ve got this crazy thing. What do you think? 

Brandon: 

Yeah, I agree. I think it’s, uh it is hard, even though we’ve known each other for, you know, 67 years now to still Thio, confess something or not confessed but to just express ah hard feeling with, you know, knowing the other person might get offended, whatever So, But if you don’t do that, it’s exactly what you say in Snow on and and get much worse. 

Jeremy: 

So I used to let things fester in the beginning of our marriage and just kind of write that story in my head and be mad at him and he wouldn’t know why. 

Jeremy: 

And I had to just finally be like, Listen, this is uncomfortable for me to talk about. 

Jeremy: 

I’m emotional. This is weird, but I just have to get it off my chest. And at least at that point now he knows this and either he could do something about it. We can work on it together, but oh my gosh, open communication lines. Being able to say and do anything knowing that your intentions were not to hurt them is crucial. We see so many couples struggle right now. Friends, families, and I’m like, Oh my gosh, the way that they talk to each other’s disgusting like rude means. So I think that’s very brave, brave of both of you to admit it and to talk about it on the podcast. 

Jenna: 

So I’m really grateful for that, and I think it’s a good lesson. I think one of the things that I have identified you bet and I is that we just name it right. So if I’m working on something or one of the things with Tibetan, I that normally does happen a lot is like, I’m not a good person when I’m hungry. 

Brandon: 

I mean, eso So I’m like, you know, you gotta catch yourself because you’re in this hunger and you’re annoyed. And I’m like, Hey, I’m hungry and instantly, That’s like, Okay, she might not like it, right, because she wants to talk or, I don’t know, do the yoga ball or go walking dogs or do something fun. But at least she understands it. And I think for us, that’s done it or she’ll be talking. I’ll be like, Hey, look, I absolutely have got to get this thing. I gotta write this thing. So you know, I’m not ignoring you. I am ignoring you, But I don’t want to. But I’ve got to do this, right, But I don’t think I don’t think. What do you think? Did you guys just get tired? Like what? You learned that on your own. Did you have coaching like what? How did you think you found that? 

Brandon: 

I mean, I’ve always been in and out of counseling, so I think I’ve learned that just in my own mental health journey, I think I share a lot of that with Jeremy that’s just very honest. And then just seeing other examples of what we don’t want, like we always talk about what we don’t want. So as long as we know we’re on the same page with that, then we have to just push through. 

Jenna: 

I mean, do you have any answer? 

Jenna: 

Well, I was thinking about so occasionally I meditate. I would love for this to be habitually I meditate anyway. It’s a form of being present. That’s what you Brandon saying. I’m hungry. That’s exactly what that is. It’s acknowledging the way you’re feeling right now, making it known, and it it creates understanding for you and it sounds like for your wife. So if you can learn to just take a quick second to think about how you’re feeling and communicate that both you know, for your own good, I guess for your partner in this case, the benefit is huge for me. I try really hard and not perfect, but to solve a problem as quickly as possible. And that’s a good business tip as well as you know, that you might not even really know what the answer is, but the quicker you can try to solve that problem and move on, the better off you’re gonna be. 

Jeremy: 

I think that’s really good advice. It’s actually you are exactly right is even for ourselves. I think that’s a good point for listeners. 

Brandon: 

Is if you’re nervous, If you’re getting having high anxiety from whatever that ISS and you name it, it gives you control at that moment, right? 

Brandon: 

So I think. 

Brandon: 

And I think the interesting thing is, is Jeremy, I am very grateful to you for bringing it back to business. 

Brandon: 

The thing that I like to say is that this is business that we’re talking about. Like if you can’t work out that you can’t tell your partner that you’ve got work to do because you’re doing this side hustle business that you’re trying to get up and running and that it really is for the greater good or for whatever that is, then you It will not work relationships in all business on. 

Brandon: 

That’s why I was wondering about that dynamic going back to beginning, because when I read the website Jeremy’s idea here and then you bought in. 

Jenna: 

But if Jeremy had this idea to do this quencher adventure and you didn’t buy in. It doesn’t work. 

Brandon: 

Mhm. 

Jenna: 

Yeah. No, that’s a very realistic I remember talking to my mom about in the very, very beginning. I was like, Yeah, I think it’s just like a hobby. I think that’s is just like an interest. She’s like, Okay, I’m like, yeah, and then all of a sudden, it’s like, Wait, you guys air starting a logo. You have an LLC. Like, why do you have all these business things I’m like? Because we need to build a brand. 

Jenna: 

So, yeah, I think it’s important. However that works. But if you don’t have your family on board, man, I mean, can you imagine doing quench your adventure without it’s just mhm would be quenching e. 

Brandon: 

I mean, yeah, it wouldn’t work. 

Brandon: 

Eso What do you now? 

Brandon: 

You’re 2.5 months in to this. 

Brandon: 

It seems like you guys were really happy. 

Jeremy: 

Do you anticipate, like, is this gonna I understand You have some stress, and that’s just life, right? 

Brandon: 

Like shit happens, and you’re gonna have to deal with it. But right now, are you feeling positive that the RV adventure is gonna staying for a while? 

Brandon: 

For sure? 

Brandon: 

Yeah, I mean, we we really want to do more traveling abroad and actually had thought about moving abroad at a time, and I still think about that occasionally hit. Maybe now is not the best time. Being in the RV is probably much better, but I think this adventure could last a long time. 

Jeremy: 

I think this could be a great home base if we were to do more international travel. If we’re totally remote, I mean, I’m no, we don’t know how long we we don’t actually have a time frame. 

Jeremy: 

People have asked us. That’s a very popular question. How long are you doing this? And we don’t know until one of us truly is not liking it, hating it or resenting it, then we’ll just keep going until I get pregnant or so which we definitely want to have a family eventually. 

Jenna: 

But we’re at least a few years from that. Yeah, so it could be a few years, but also, like, I see us having some kind of rvp pretty much for the rest of our existence just because it’s fun, even if it’s just, you know, sat in the backyard and became the guesthouses. 

Jeremy: 

Yeah, we can road trips with the kids. Yeah, it’s definitely are. 

Jenna: 

Do you find that you sleep better in the RV than you did in your bedroom as faras mattresses? 

Brandon: 

Specifically, my favorite is the one that that was in our van. 

Brandon: 

It was the cheapest. It was $160 off Amazon, just a little five inch thick memory foam. But, man, I sleep great on that thing, but for me, I don’t know that there’s that much of a difference. I sleep fine. 

Jeremy: 

Oh, I sleep way better in the RV, and I think it’s because I think the mattress is an interesting thing. 

Brandon: 

I think our mattress and RV is okay, but it compared to the matches we have at home, sucks. But I think it’s because you live mawr with nature and light. 

Brandon: 

So in your house at night we try to turn down, and then the lights mainly did get in in the circadian rhythm. But I find that event and I will fall asleep. Eight o’clock, sleep like an absolute log. It’s quieter and ah, lot of the places, especially where you’re parking and for whatever reason, and then you get up at like the naturally when when you rise. 

Brandon: 

So for us we we absolutely do. And I think there’s less distractions in your RV. There’s just less stuff. 

Brandon: 

Yeah, Jeremy definitely is into what you just said going to bed when it’s dark waking up when it’s light using the natural lighting of the world, The sun, the moon And I’m like, Oh, man, don’t we have to go to bed? Can I sleep in? 

Jenna: 

Especially now is the days are getting shorter. I’m like, Jeez, I wanna be awake while we do have some light for the 12 hours or no, not even that it’s gonna last So e I agree with you. 

Jeremy: 

We were that was were looking outside happened Bay has a lot of fog and everything, but not a lot. But it can. We’re looking at it wasn’t falling or anything was 4 30 it’s starting to get dark. It’s just like it’s depressing unto it. It’s depressing unto himself. Well, another. 

Brandon: 

How do you do You feel relieved to get rid of all that? 

Jenna: 

I’m not gonna not use the word junk, but I just use the word junk, but stuff that you had like do you just feel freer that what you own is in that RV e mean between six years of being together and just bringing in so much randomness like I don’t even know. 

Brandon: 

When we went through all our stuff, I was like, Why? What is this purpose? You know, people talk about Marie condo on Netflix, and she’s all about minimizing and saying goodbye to things that you hold on to for nothing. So I did a practice, a lot of your methods with looking at something that meant a lot to me that I either had to take a picture with in my mind on my phone or somehow documented and be okay with letting it go because I don’t need it. I was stressed looking at my house. I’m like, What is all this? 

Jenna: 

Yeah, but the even Mawr extreme example that I’d love to experience a little bit more at some point is, you know, the trips we’ve taken, although most of them not more than a couple of weeks, you know, we’re only bringing a couple of backpacks. That is even more freeing. It’s like, Wow, we don’t really need a whole lot more. Yeah, I miss my bike and maybe my skis. But other than that, it’s like, what do you really need? What’s really bringing you? 

Jeremy: 

Joy? Like we had 77 pairs of shoes. We have, like, 12 way had close to 100 pairs of shoes. And luckily, we were able to sell and donate most of them all of our shoes or sitting in a small little box right there. 

Jenna: 

Yeah, I’m not saying that in shock is I’m thinking, like the box out of my garage. 

Brandon: 

Probably. Yeah. 

Jenna: 

Yeah. 

Brandon: 

We’re, uh, for may I just have way too many interests. So I’ve got well, two pairs of climbing shoes. Now there’s a pair of biking shoes, hiking shoes, running shoes, ski boots, that one, a shoe. 

Jeremy: 

That’s all in one. 

Jenna: 

I don’t think it’s gonna happen. 

Jeremy: 

Okay, I I will agree with you, Like for me? We When we moved across the country, we left a lot of the stuff and it just felt good. 

Brandon: 

I mean, for three years, I didn’t even want anything in our house here in Half Moon Bay, on the walls. 

Brandon: 

And eventually that was like, Hey, look, man, like I get it. But we got to do something and and and we did. But now I think we both feel like home. It’s well, now we have artwork like Jesus, what are we gonna do with all this? And when I’m in the RV, I always think to myself, Well, God, I don’t have, like, I think about weird things, right? Like I don’t have an air compressor. I don’t have all this crap that I’ve gotta think about maintaining Its just so free. 

Brandon: 

I’m thinking about my room in college. That’s a really funny example. Had a twin mattress, one desk in chair. And I think all of my socks and boxers were in a dole banana cardboard box. 

Jeremy: 

When I walked into his room at the age of 19, I said this going Not cute. I just doubled The ground is so free. 

Jenna: 

Absolutely. 

Jeremy: 

Wow, E. I mean, it’s just easier. And I think I think it can. 

Brandon: 

I think that all the stuff can creep up very, very easy. It’s like boiling the frog. But if you have an RV, I think it forces you Thio really think twice because where you you only got so much storage. Oh yeah, I shouldn’t have bought the last three shirts I bought because now my closet doesn’t have any space I don’t have. 

Brandon: 

I purposely brought on Lee the amount of hangers I needed to hang my clothes, and now I have three shirts folded and I don’t like that because I need to get rid of three shirts that it’s all just with the hangers. 

Jenna: 

Well, it sounds like you’re having a good time. I’d like to get your thoughts on. 

Brandon: 

I see you on instagram and talk just a few minutes about your social media presence. 

Jenna: 

I will bring up the email list, which, you know, I would be remiss without asking if you are building your email list. But the what I’m interested in is is one of the things that people say to me is creating content takes so much time, and I think creating content takes a lot of time if you’re going to try to edit and make things like Perfect, which I’m not convinced you need to make perfect. 

Brandon: 

In fact, I think it’s more authentic, but I see both of you. 

Brandon: 

I mean, at the top of my instagram story, quench your adventure on Instagram is always at the top. Which is One is because I watch it. Right, But two is because you’re always adding stories 24 7. So how much time is it really taking you? 

Brandon: 

And do you plan this or you just documenting your life? 

Brandon: 

Yeah, You should check Jenna’s screen time. 

Jeremy: 

I had to get those little glasses that help of blue light just in case if I’m gonna brew in my eyes or something With all this phone use, I will say Jeremy is our YouTube edit video maker. He is in charge of all things YouTube and I I don’t understand any of it. And I am all instagram. I will do the stories. I will do videos, host captions, rials. I g tv, whatever. So at least like we know, these are two separate jobs. But we also collaborate and combine all the time on both. It probably takes in a day just to be consistently active and engaged on instagram 3 to 6 hours. 

Jenna: 

As faras planning goes, maybe we would be better off doing mawr planning in advance. 

Jenna: 

You don’t plan anything. 

Jeremy: 

It’s so bad. 

Jenna: 

It’s really just whatever is in front of us that. But it’s I mean, it was kind of it made sense with the lifestyle, while we were, you know, on the road, like really moving quickly. We just kind of make it up as we go, like we’re having a here. Let’s keep having a good time here and let’s keep sharing about you know what we’re seeing. So it made it easier. But, man, there’s still backlogs. I mean, stuff that we could be sharing that, you know, now is like months old neo. I don’t know how I’d ever you know, we’ve ever stayed totally on top. 

Jeremy: 

Yeah. I wonder if other instagrammers or YouTubers and bloggers like, how? How quickly is there? Turn around like I want to be the people that if it snowed, it snowed and it snowed today and you know it is. And tomorrow you’ll show up and there’s snow on the ground. I don’t want to be someone whose, like hosting these perfect fall foliage leaves. And then you come and it was a day ago. You’re like, this was from six weeks ago. Why you doing that? 

Jenna: 

Yeah, we did. Somebody asked us. We posted about these hot springs in Wyoming and, like I posted three days late three days late and they were like it was one degree and it snowed. 

Jeremy: 

Where’s all the snow? I go? Oh, shoot Like was in three days. The weather changed. 

Jenna: 

So are you doing the Let’s Let’s Jeremy your doing. The YouTube videos are Are you? What are you using to edit those videos? 

Brandon: 

For a long time, I was just using video shop, which is just a free, not very robust app on my phone and on the iPad on your own. A lot of it. 

Jeremy: 

You’d be surprised. Wow, 25 videos on YouTube channel, but really trying to get a little more professional. 

Jenna: 

And now that we’re trying to shoot more with the camera, getting videos to a phone doesn’t really make a lot of sense. So I’m editing on the computer now using DaVinci Resolve, which there is a paid version, but I’m using a free version. It’s probably a little more robust than my laptop likes, because it’s always, you know, buzzing and like it’s you know, it’s been a handful of times, for it’ll like randomly crash and I learned to turn on auto save after having two of those occurrences. Eso Yeah, it’s still a struggle. I feel like, you know, the most rookie of rookies, but somehow are throwing it together. And I just have to try to keep telling myself, like you said, it doesn’t have to be perfect. You know? I want things to be visually nice. Want the story to be good? I probably spend more time on things that I need Thio. But somewhere in between, those two perspectives is probably the right place the land, so we’ll figure it out. 

Jeremy: 

I think you guys get and look where entrepreneurs are all wanna be perfectionists at some level, But you can’t let great get in the way of good when good is good enough. Now, Jenna, how about all these instagram things? Are you doing all this stuff on your phone? 

Brandon: 

Yes, I only use my phone and I have no idea what I’m posting tomorrow because I have no idea. Like I don’t use any of the APs. 

Jenna: 

How do you do? The videos do not edit that you edit the videos and the native or use an iPhone. 

Brandon: 

Oh, yeah. All the videos on Instagram are truly just shot from the iPhone itself, and it’s usually posted the same day. So, like if I just showed, you know, me, walking through the leaves, that happened a couple hours ago. So, like I told Jeremy how stressful it is for me that our stories on Instagram, which are supposed to be not live but current time, get back long so much that I missed so many great opportunities because I don’t want to post something that’s not I’m very strict with myself about, like not putting something out there that’s not actually happening within that 24 to 48 hour range. 

Jenna: 

So so that that that’s really good advice. I do have a question. When you were saying that, Jenna, because one of the things I watch you and I know how this feels. 

Brandon: 

I had a social networking site where you I felt like I had post all the time. 

Jenna: 

What do you think that it’s taking away from your talking about going Jeremy, going back toe meditating and being in the moment? Is it? Do you feel like you have to document this because you have this brand and does it take away from the experience that you’re having, Or do you set time aside and be like, Okay, we got a record, or do you even think about that like, Oh, that’s a great question. 

Brandon: 

And we just talked about that recently that we wanted to actually put out there and say, Hey, guys like, please, if you’re ever photographing or videoing anything, look with your eyes first, Do not look at what you’re looking at through the screen. For example, this moose encounter we had in the Grand Teton National Park. We finally saw Moose. Me and Jeremy didn’t whip out our phones right away, even though I wanted to so bad, because I have been talking about wanting to see moose for so long. No, we literally were just like watching, looking, breathing in the air, looking at the sun setting, looking at the moose baby, go up to its mom, looking at each other, excited. So I think that is huge. Do not get wrapped up in the experience documenting it, experience it yourself and then take your phone out and explain what’s happening in this story. So I definitely that was a huge piece that I needed to fulfill. What I was doing. What’s the point of doing what I’m doing for everybody else If I’m not enjoying it? 

Jenna: 

Part of me misses the days where SD cards would fill up after 200 photos and your iPhone storage couldn’t handle it, then you’re just course thio. Enjoy the moment or go delete a bunch of stuff to take the photo. 

Jeremy: 

Sometimes we’ll do no phone zones. I think that’s important for couples, relationships, families, whatever. We’ll go out, grab something to eat. We’ll go on a bike rack. Don’t bring our phones. Let’s not do anything. If we saw something cool, Too bad, so sad, we saw with our eyes. 

Jenna: 

Yeah, that’s the I call it the Snow Leopard. If you’ve ever watched the secret life of Walter Mitty movie well, in that, I won’t ruin the ending. But the in that scene there’s a photographer and a snow leopard, which I’m a big fan of very, very hard to see their their they’re elusive. They don’t come out a lot, and this guy apparently is waiting to see the snow leopard. And he had been waiting to take a picture and he puts the camera down. 

Brandon: 

And there’s somebody there and he’s like, What? Why you putting the camera down like you hiked? You literally came three quarters of the way around the world to see the snow leopard. You’ve been sitting up here freezing your ass off, and now you see the snow leopard and you’re not going to take the photo. And he said, Sometimes you just want to experience that moment. And I always call that I tell my wife I was like a snow leopard, and that’s like the key word for us. And then she s Oh, I was just curious because I I feel like I’m there every moment with you both in, like doing this. And I’m when I did see you in Wyoming, which I’ve spent a lot of time in Jackson Hole. And there is just incredible wildlife there that if you do not put your phone down, you will miss because animals blend in with nature. And I say, maybe that was the first moose that you saw. But maybe you were with the move somewhere else and didn’t see it because you had your phone or your camera or something else up. And I think there’s this balance. I just find it interesting, you know, especially with these influencers out there. Like what part of their life is riel like? When are they gonna wake up? Three years from now on. Be like, Wow. 

Brandon: 

Well, what did I do like? And there’s this feeling that you have to documented. It doesn’t sound like Sounds like you’ve kept that balance hard. 

Brandon: 

Well, no. Now you’re making me think about it even more. And now I’m like, Oh, my gosh, Am I exposing too much of our lives, like, let me live my life? 

Jenna: 

Well, I think you have to balance, right? Because if you’re gonna build a ah brand around that, I will be honest. I struggled with that in the last years when I ran that social immediate. You know, I ran the largest social networking site for sport fishermen, and I will tell you that it completely ruined fishing for me. I felt like I needed to fish, and that’s saying a lot. And and candidly, I think I sold that company 8.5 years ago and I have not been fishing once. 

Brandon: 

Now, this is a guy who goes fishing used to fish 200 plus easier and I’ll caveat that I have a nephew who is an awesome guy, and I will go fishing with him and my brother in a minute. But I don’t count that as like my fishing. 

Brandon: 

Yeah, I’m not fishing. I’m fishing because I’m spending time with my brother and my my nephew, and we have a good time. But I have not fished in 8.5 years and there’s fishing out front of my house here in Half Moon Bay. 

Brandon: 

But my point is saying that story, and I don’t you say all and maybe there’s some sadness to that. But I do believe that it really it burned me out because I felt like I had a fish. And when I fished, I felt like I had a document it, and candidly, if that was the business, which it was you, you have to do that right. And I didn’t separate it, mainly because I didn’t have a ton of people working with me or anything. 

Brandon: 

But I will tell you that it can do that, and I just I’m not saying that I have a good answer and how to balance it. you know, it’s really, really hard, but you don’t want to get burned out. 

Brandon: 

Yeah, that zip. The great conundrum of life, I guess. I don’t know. I’d love to hear if you have any other advice or thoughts about just, you know, we tell people toe follow your passions in your dreams. But if those are the way that you’re creating your income, it’s like, you know, same example I’ve gone climbing with rock climbing guides who, you know, start to lose the zest for climbing over time. It’s like if we lose, this s to travel. 

Jeremy: 

E don’t think I could but say that now. 

Jenna: 

So I don’t know. 

Jeremy: 

Yeah, I was your age and a fishing absolute, like there was nothing, but I mean, all I wanted to do was fish, And I did. I finished 200 plus days a year, and the only reason I didn’t fish the other days was I don’t even know what. It wasn’t holidays because I fished on holidays. It was the weather or or it was it was something. But I think my advice there, and it’s interesting, you know, there’s that popular thing out there. Follow your passion do what you’re passionate about. 

Brandon: 

Actually, I’m not sure that I believe that. Now my lenses is that I got burned out, right? And and look, I got burned out, but it was a great outcome. I’m not complaining. Like I sold a company, I made a bunch of money. I bought a house in Half Moon Bay and have a life that it afforded me. But it did cost something right. Exhausted that that that life of fishing. But it opened up A You know, I’ve been biking for 12 years, and I absolutely love riding my bike. And I’ve seen mawr on my bike than I would probably ever see anywhere. So I think in life you have to look at why something happened. And you know somebody who say, Well, that’s really sad. And I say, Yeah, maybe it’s sad for a minute, but it opened up a new life that I would have otherwise not had the opportunity to have. But going back to your question, Jeremy, is I think you should do what you’re really good at, and I think that you should like doing it. You’re not going to do anything that you don’t like doing? What I would say is that if I were to go back and be able to redo the social networking site for sport fishermen, I would say that I instead of getting caught in this, I need to produce content. 

Brandon: 

I need to produce content to engage. 

Brandon: 

I would have created more products. 

Jenna: 

Meaning for you. 

Brandon: 

I would think like you bend to Jackson, you bend in Wyoming instead of trying Thio continually document every minute of every thing to get that engagement, I might write a guide that allows me to batch my time better. 

Brandon: 

Right? 

Brandon: 

I’m gonna spend 15 hours writing this guide. You know, I started that with my social networking site on doing online classes, and I did have a podcast which wasn’t called a podcast. It was called upload your audio file to the Internet and let something, but I think I would have created more products and built it around selling those so that I didn’t get burned out. Now, look, some people might just be more. 

Brandon: 

I don’t know what the word is. Maybe they’re more resilient. And I did you know I did it for 20 years, Maybe less. Yeah, maybe a little less, but it was 15 years. 

Brandon: 

You know, it’s a long time to be in a grind that, you know, you turn into. So I don’t know if that’s good advice. I I don’t even know if that’s advice, Jeremy, for Jennifer, both of you. But it’s all I say is be cognizant of it because the moment it cheat, you don’t think it can change, and it can. And you don’t. Once you get there, it’s really hard to throttle it back because that business that you built relies on it, right? Like what? Are you gonna dio? Um, I’m not going to see Jenna at the top of my feet anymore, because that’s the business you built. Which was that engagement, you know, or is it better to build? Take all of that content. Maybe you decide to do from your three hours a day toe one hour a day, which and and take that other time and do YouTube videos that when you get a YouTube video, you get all this traffic right and the put all this time into, and then it’s a product, and then you can take some time to yourself. I’m not saying that I like I said, I’m giving you feedback. I don’t have the. If I had the prescription, I would have. 

Brandon: 

I think it’s good advice. We’ve talked about what you just said. I don’t want to double dip. I don’t want to show the same video on on Instagram that we’re going to show on YouTube because people aren’t gonna watch it on YouTube. 

Jenna: 

But that’s how we’re eventually going to be being paid. 

Jenna: 

Well, let me just say this Thio answer that that is, uh, an I to this day have that do not get caught up in that in that feeling. And here’s why you those air too. So one thing I do an example, I tell when I go on podcast or you’ve heard me teach right, I generally I have a library of stories that I use as lessons as it relates to, like, thes bigger lessons that I didn’t happen yesterday. So I have a story of whatever it ISS and I used to feel what you feel, General, which is well, I can’t I can’t say that on Instagram and then say it on YouTube and then say it on my podcast or and then write a block post about it. And I actually did this yesterday. It was hard. But here’s the deal. Those air different audiences. 

Brandon: 

Your instagram is not necessarily your to YouTube. You will have this this crossover. But I would suggest to you that the people who are your fans who watch two channels, actually, don’t mind hearing it again. 

Brandon: 

Yeah, and I did this, so I yesterday I don’t know if you’re on my email us. 

Jenna: 

I think you are. But I sent this. I sent the JP Morgan email, which was a negotiation lesson. 

Brandon: 

Well, guess where that came from. Do you know where that came from? You know me. Do you know where that came from? 

Brandon: 

Mm. It came from my block post of which you two didn’t read. And that was new to you, But you hadn’t. But it wasn’t new to me. So I think you can repeat thes over and over again and not risk that. So that would be my I like that. 

Brandon: 

And that’s true because I just looked at our YouTube insights and analytics. It is like 75 85% male on instagram. It is like the opposite. It is all these females across the world following our journey. But everybody’s on. Our YouTube is male. I’m like, Okay, fine. 

Jenna: 

And most of the YouTube views are not even from subscribers. 

Jeremy: 

So they’re all organic, Natural, random. 

Jenna: 

Now, you don’t have to kill yourself to create this content because you can cross use the content and you don’t feel like. 

Jenna: 

And look, I am I’m raising my hand here. I’m a guilty as anyone I’m like, I want everything to be unique, I But you know who does this? And I really pounds at home, and I don’t know if you follow as a marketer, I fall just because I know through the grapevine, which is Russell Bronson from Click Funnels. And if you that dude tells I could tell you all the stories literally like they’re in his book there on his in his ads, they’re all the same, but I’ve never gotten I mean, I’m a student of it, but I never really gotten tired of it. And if it if it didn’t work of all people on this earth of online marketers, Russell wouldn’t keep doing it. He wouldn’t. He wouldn’t do that. And you can see that lesson when Not just him. It just comes to mind because those videos come up a lot. But I think we get caught up. Is what are we content for makers or whatever we are? 

Brandon: 

Yeah. 

Jeremy: 

Content Creator. 

Jenna: 

And we want it to be unique. But I think you can reuse stuff all the time. I think on Instagram the and the some of the social networks they do want I think the platform dictates what they want. So they want on Instagram. They don’t want three days ago in Wyoming when it’s sunny out. But on YouTube, they don’t care, because YouTube is is looking back. 

Brandon: 

So I think I think Yeah, well, yeah, I mean, I think and I think you have to pick your platforms like I have a terrible you both asked me. 

Brandon: 

You’re like, hey, or is this gonna be taped like you’re gonna do this? YouTube and I’ve had enough enough challenges in keeping my podcast consistent, much less trying to do. 

Brandon: 

So I’ve got why now I think I don’t know, 50 podcast episodes that with no one video has been released on YouTube and I want to do a YouTube channel. 

Brandon: 

But what I found was a soon as I start doing the YouTube channel now, my podcast isn’t three days a week now. I’m not consistent and considered success in time when success in time. 

Brandon: 

So you’ve got to be successful somewhere. 

Brandon: 

And if that’s on INSTAGRAM, be there if it’s on you to be there and have ultimate success in that channel before you do that last week, I don’t know if you read my email, but I basically created this pressure because I was like, of all things that I know. And I know Jeremy is gonna be like, I you’re gonna bring up this stupid email thing. But if anything I learned in my online experiences is that your email listers is the most valuable marketing asset you have, period No. 

Brandon: 

Two, no two ways about it. And you should email your list, in my opinion, at least twice a week. And and not only that is, however many subscribers you have. You you ultimately should be making a dollar a month. Her sub. If you suck, that’s just that’s just the marketing dynamic you could make 10. 

Brandon: 

Some people make 30. But if you think about that, you’re like, OK, well, now, if I had 3000 subs and I make a dollar person, you’ve got to create a product for him. But I have I suck. I had I I think this morning we had 28,000 people on our build a business list and on specifically to build a business. I have some other lists that I cross promote but on that list and, like, why wouldn’t I be emailing them twice a week? 

Brandon: 

And I haven’t been doing it. 

Jenna: 

So last week I was like, Hey, if you catch me, not emailing twice a week, you get a free course from me, which, you know it’s 1000 bucks, but what it does, is it It costs me money every time I do that. So I’ve created that pressure. But so now my So now talking about priorities is podcast three times a week and emails twice a week. 

Brandon: 

And if we can accomplish that because and with you it sounds like you’re doing Instagram and YouTube, are you cross promoting to Facebook? 

Brandon: 

We are the instagram. Almost everything goes to Facebook and then every time we posted YouTube video. It’s going to Facebook as well. 

Jeremy: 

So what was the one last question on the social media? 

Jeremy: 

What was the magic? 

Jenna: 

And then we’ll get to your three h p t s that I know you have for people. What was the magic? You guys really have grown your instagram following like And it seemed to happen like something over a period of time. What? What was that? 

Brandon: 

Magic. It was a slow start for sure. And then when we were consistent and when we were doing stories, I did not know how much that matter to people talking with your voice with your eyes interacting with them, not just putting a picture of two people holding hands in front of a pretty mountain when they got to know who we are, what we do, what we act like, what we sound like, where we live, where we go, which could be very invasive. But that was like a game changer. People were viewing our stories like crazy, wanting more wanting to know who we are. So it kind of just was like being super authentic and riel also being super real in upfront about struggles and, like people don’t want a picture. 

Jenna: 

Perfect. I realized that it’s ridiculous. Oh my gosh, There’s enough of that out there. 

Jenna: 

So we’re trying to be a little bit different. 

Jeremy: 

I wish people had put the rial nous on living in an RV because it looked beautiful. Perfect windows open to the Grand Tetons with, ah, cup of coffee with steam and a moose. And I’m like, Yeah, let’s do that. And I’m like, y’all were sitting at a rest stop dumping our Yeah, Another component is there is a lot of strategy that goes into it as well. 

Jenna: 

Ah, lot of learning the platform. I mean, when we started, you know, we post a photo way quote Yeah, we wouldn’t really pay that much attention, Thio. You know who was liking and commenting? We weren’t really using Hashtags 23 lights and no new follows for three months like it was very obvious. 

Jeremy: 

And then when we realize people want a story, people want to engage. You can’t just put a quote. That’s great. You could do that every once in a while to inspire, but they don’t want that. They want to know what made you take that picture what you do. 

Jenna: 

What did you went? You need the right people to see your stuff. You need to figure out who it is that’s gonna follow you and try to figure out what hashtag they might be following and looking at and using. So there’s there’s a lot that goes into it so much that we wrote a guide about how to grow in a book on how to grow your social media engagement follower ratio and everything so that people could be like, Oh, okay, like those air some good dips that I didn’t know about. 

Jeremy: 

Yeah, and we’ve spent money to learn its’s. 

Jenna: 

There’s funny to learn, So yeah, it didn’t happen overnight, and, uh, there’s definitely been a lot of it was like birthday when we hit 10,000 after, I think, a year and a half, almost a year posting a posting, a lot every leave, I mean every day. 

Jeremy: 

Pretty much so. 

Jenna: 

Was it just Is it Was it the Was it just it just the flywheel effect that once you got to a certain place and you figured out they wanted to hear authenticity, authenticity, or was it that was it a combination of hashtags and dialing that in and it just all came together. 

Brandon: 

Do you think? 

Jeremy: 

Yeah, a lot. 

Brandon: 

Yeah. I mean, doing the occasional giveaway is very helpful trying Thio. 

Jeremy: 

Dual, Iet’s a lot of randomness, but you do have to dedicate and understand why you’re doing it for sure. 

Jenna: 

Yeah. Yeah, there’s a lot to it. It’s not one thing. 

Jeremy: 

Yeah, like when someone asks us that question, I wanna be like, Well, read our guide because I can’t tell you in one sentence. What about? 

Jenna: 

Well, where do they get the guide way? 

Brandon: 

Haven’t put it really out there. Like why? I don’t what? I just I just threw you like the slowest pitch that I could possibly give you. 

Jenna: 

I’m uploading it on our website today. 

Brandon: 

Okay. 

Jenna: 

And that’s quench your adventure dot com. 

Brandon: 

Yeah, I’m gonna do that right now. 

Jenna: 

There’s a perfect glimpse of our unorganized life. 

Jeremy: 

Well, I just look, it don’t feel like I think like you said the perfect picture with the news, all of us, even people who have a lot of experience, we it’s just you struggle with it, man. It’s just ah lot to keep up with and just to write that book took you. Probably. It’s not like you just sat down, wrote to you Book. There’s just so much to it. So if you’re listening, Jenna has committed that somewhere on their front page, you will build this guide that you should be asking people’s email address for two down free down landing page landing page. 

Brandon: 

So I really appreciate you both coming on taking time out of your day. 

Jenna: 

It’s good to see you. I feel like I see you every day, but I actually have really haven’t talked to you that much. And I haven’t seen you in my office hours, mainly because I think you’re putting everything into action and making it happen. And I think that’s a good thing. I think you gotta balance between learning and actually just going doing. And I’m terrible, like I want to take courses and I want to read books. And then I’m like, maybe I should just put down this book and and put everything that this book just taught me into action and spend time doing that. So congratulations on that. Can you give us three h p. T. S for running a side hustle and going mobile for sure. 

Brandon: 

Ah, lot of them have kind of been revealed through this great conversation, but I think the first one is authenticity and we talked a lot about that. I don’t know if you have anything else specific people will see through you if you’re just trying to get by them and trying to use them or take their money. 

Jeremy: 

No, like you’re just you’re committing a relationship and showing the rial nous and being on honest and up front about things. Whether that’s relationships, your business, your brand collapse, whatever. Just be honest, because then you’ll never get caught in the line. You’ll never feel like you’re being a hypocrite yourself. 

Jenna: 

Yeah, morally. Be honest with yourself. What’s working? What’s not. Yeah, when you get at and a second Number two is, you cannot be every thing to everyone. It is so easy. Thio Way wanted to follow us and like what we’re doing. But you know, you still get hateful comments, you know? Still, for whatever reason, we have these percentages, demographics, blah, blah, blah. But the point is, is don’t try to satisfy everybody because it will not work. Trying to get a clear is possible about who likes what you’re doing and keep doing things that they will like and that match up with what you’re good at. 

Jeremy: 

And then the third one we had instead, it was specifically to like a niche and what you’re good at? 

Jenna: 

Eso I guess that pairs the end of Don’t from Jewel. 

Jenna: 

There’s no for your podcast. 

Jenna: 

You really want to send out emails what we want to really work on our YouTube and our instruments and email storing but like stick to what you’re good at and stick to the niche. 

Jenna: 

And don’t be all over the place like we’re a travel couple. 

Jenna: 

RV life people. 

Jenna: 

I’m not going to start showing you all this. 

Jenna: 

I don’t know grass cutting, lawn, mowing company stuff and, like, I don’t know, dog tips. We don’t have a dog, so we need to stick to what we’re good at. 

Jenna: 

I think there’s a great advice on, And how can people find you quench your adventure on everything very easy across the board YouTube instagram on our website in our website all is quench your adventure, which Jeremy came up with. 

Brandon: 

Uh, it will never be quenched. 

Jeremy: 

You will always get thirsty again for adventure. 

Jenna: 

Yeah, that was his concept. 

Jeremy: 

And our logo had to have water because it’s all about quench your desire. 

Jenna: 

It’s very good. I’m looking at your YouTube channel. Quench your adventure, which you can just google and find out. And then quench your adventure dot com. You get everything from Jeremy and Jenna across all the platforms, so hey, thanks, guys. 

Brandon: 

For And thanks for opening up and sharing a lot of stuff, I think is really helpful for listeners out there. And it is authentic. So thanks for doing that. 

Brandon: 

Yeah, thank you. I mean, there’s a great conversation motivating for us to keep charging the hustle. Yeah, get our strategy. Maurin line building email list. I mean, there’s there’s plenty of things that we could be doing. 

Jeremy: 

And Jeremy always says you are one of his favorite guest speakers. When we heard you talk. 

Jenna: 

So I’ll send you. 

Jenna: 

I’ll send you the check to your mobile nail address for that. So thank you. I appreciate it. Well, good luck. We’re going to check in with you sometime next year. You don’t have an address, do you? Where you dio Well, technically, Yeah, it’s just Ah, mailbox at a post office Gets forwarded to us wherever we end up. 

Brandon: 

Right on. 

Jenna: 

Well, that’s a good time. 

Jeremy: 

So thanks a lot, guys. 

Jenna: 

And enjoy your holidays. 

Brandon: 

Thank you. You too. Stay safe and enjoy. 

Jenna: 

Well, if that doesn’t get you jacked up to quit your lease, sell your house and buy an RV and travel the world, I don’t know what does. 

Brandon: 

Pretty cool, right, Jeremy? 

Brandon: 

Janet, Thanks for coming on and sharing your story. 

Brandon: 

We are definitely coming to tune in with you and 68 months and see how it’s going. 

Brandon: 

And thank you, friends, for tuning into the show. 

Jenna: 

If you enjoyed this episode, please rate review. 

Brandon: 

We want to hear from you and subscribe. 

Jenna: 

So you don’t miss any of our weekly episodes until the next time. Remember, you are just one business plan away. I’m rooting for your success. We’ll see you soon

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