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How Nancy Connor Left Corporate America After Twenty Years and Started Smart Adaptive Clothing _ Ep. 100!

How Nancy Connor Left Corporate America After Twenty Years and Started Smart Adaptive Clothing | EP.100 | Business Podcast

How Nancy Connor Left Corporate America After Twenty Years and Started Smart Adaptive Clothing | EP.100 | Business Podcast

How Nancy Connor Left Corporate America After Twenty Years and Started Smart Adaptive Clothing

Summary

Nancy Connor had a successful career in sales in corporate America and one day, literally, decided she had enough and walked out, dropped the mic.

The next day she founded Smart Adaptive Clothing to follow her calling. I’ve known Nancy over three years and she’s built a real business.

Nancy drops tons of actionable tips for fellow entrepreneurs.

Oh yea, this is our 100 episode. Boom! Thanks for all your support of our podcast.

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More Information on Build a Business Success Secrets

Brandon: 

Hello, Franz. Welcome to the show. Won’t couldn’t be more excited our 1/100 episode and I couldn’t be more excited to have Nancy Connor on our show today who has been a student and exemplifies really what this show is all about About following your dreams, to solve a problem for people and to build a business. 

And not only that, but do it at any age. 

You’re gonna love Nancy Story about how she built smart adaptive clothing and one day, after 20 plus years in corporate America, just decided to do a mic drop and walk out and start a company. 

And she’s doing it. 

Brandon: 

You’re going to love this inspirational story. 

Brandon: 

Nancy is wonderful and drops a ton of high percentage tips for you that you can put into action in your business right away. 

Brandon: 

Here we go. 

Brandon: 

Nancy Conner, CEO of Smart adaptive clothing and how to follow your dreams at any age and make it happen. 

Brandon: 

Welcome to build a business success Secrets. The only podcast that provides straight talk for entrepreneurs. 

Brandon: 

Whether you’re an entrepreneur, starting with an idea or growing your business, this show is for you. We’ll teach you how to build a strong mindset, powerful body and profitable business so you can achieve success. And here’s your host, Brandon. See White. 

Brandon: 

We’ll have to ever have to edit that out. When do you think you’re going to announce it? 

Brandon: 

And we’re supposed to announce it in four weeks. 

Brandon: 

All right, well, we’ll announce that in four weeks, and you have to help people know that you’re announcing it. 

Brandon: 

Where do you do that? 

Brandon: 

I announced it on Instagram Facebook. Our newsletter. 

Brandon: 

Twitter. Lengthen that smart adaptive. 

Brandon: 

What is your instagram handle at smart adaptive clothing? 

Brandon: 

There you go. 

Brandon: 

Tune in four weeks, actually. 

Brandon: 

Let’s see. 

Brandon: 

Uh, this is going to come out on Wednesday. 

Brandon: 

Whatever. Next Wednesday is so 3.5 weeks tune in. Instagram Smart, adaptive clothing. Big announcement. 

Brandon: 

That’s pretty exciting. You’ve come a really long way, Nancy. 

Brandon: 

Thank you. 

Brandon: 

So are you doing this full time now? 

Brandon: 

Always. Since I met you, I started full time. 

Brandon: 

I left corporate America November 30th, 2017 and jumped in. 

Brandon: 

Had head first. 

Brandon: 

I don’t know. Full body at all. All in. 

Brandon: 

How has it been that long? 

Brandon: 

Yes. Can you believe it? 

Brandon: 

I can’t, but, uh you’ve stayed with it and, well, maybe we should go back to the beginning. 

Brandon: 

So what were you doing in Corporate America? 

Brandon: 

Okay, so I was in corporate America for over 20 years in the medical device world. 

Brandon: 

And before that, I was in telecom. 

Brandon: 

Before that, I owned my own business. 

Brandon: 

I don’t know if I ever shared that with you. 

Brandon: 

What business was that? 

Brandon: 

So I had a cleaning business, a residential cleaning business. 

Brandon: 

And that’s how I paid for 100% of my college tuition. 

Brandon: 

Wow. 

Brandon: 

Cleaning, build commercial or residential residential. 

Brandon: 

How is that in that? 

Brandon: 

A really good business. 

Brandon: 

It is a good business. And they had several employees, you know, part time. 

Brandon: 

I went to school full time. I worked full time, and I did that for six years. 

Brandon: 

So I stayed with it, and it was either going, you know, to expand that business or go corporate America. 

Brandon: 

And I went to corporate America around. 

Brandon: 

How come you went corporate America route? After six years, I wanted something new. I wanted to challenge myself, grow and, you know, get some more skills and travel. 

Brandon: 

So you name it. 

Brandon: 

That’s what I wanted to do so. 

Brandon: 

So what did you do with the business? 

Brandon: 

I just closed it. 

Brandon: 

I didn’t even sell it. I just Wow. 

Brandon: 

Uh, well, uh, and then you went into telecom. 

Brandon: 

I did. 

Brandon: 

So So let me. 

Brandon: 

I just need to understand how you go from cleaning business to Telecom. 

Brandon: 

Oh, is there a reason? Um, Well, how do you do that? Like, if there’s people listening, Which there are people, people there are people listening. I assure you of that. Um how how do you You know, people don’t understand how you do that. 

Brandon: 

Okay. 

Brandon: 

All right. So you just go. I got a headhunter, and I was interested in pharmaceutical medical sales. 

Brandon: 

Then Telecom came up and I knew people in the telecom business send some resumes out. 

Brandon: 

And, you know, I took those interviews in the different industries, but for me, that the telecom was great. 

Brandon: 

It was literally cold calling. That’s all I did on Yeah, knocking on doors. 

Brandon: 

Businesses. 

Brandon: 

What? Um, this is fun. So one of my finest moments I was just trying to convert a t and t two m. 

Brandon: 

C. I worked for M c i small businesses and this one cold call. 

Brandon: 

I did. 

Brandon: 

It was a huge corporation. I went in there. They weren’t. I didn’t know it wasn’t my size. 

Brandon: 

A cold called and got a $10,000 deal. 

Brandon: 

Oh, my God. 

Brandon: 

What? Were you doing this on the phone? Or were you, like, dressed up and knocking on the office door, dressed out, knocking on doors in the county in the Philadelphia area? I’ve never been to I didn’t know anyone just went hardcore. 

Brandon: 

Follow up. So the key from what you’ll hear from me today is a follow up. Follow up. Whatever you do follow up, most people don’t follow up, and that’s, you know that’s a big part of being successful. 

Brandon: 

Follow up. 

Brandon: 

I think that’s a good I think, people they take no as absolute, don’t you think they do? 

Brandon: 

And to me, it’s like, Well, that’s fun, But I’ll be back. 

Brandon: 

And it’s not if it’s when, so just keep going. 

Brandon: 

Don’t don’t take rejection personally. 

Brandon: 

That’s also a a big one. 

Brandon: 

So what was the secret? 

Brandon: 

When you walk in? 

Brandon: 

You know you don’t know anything and and you have to go to the receptionist. 

Brandon: 

Receptionist, I assume right? 

Brandon: 

What do you say? 

Brandon: 

I would always just introduce myself. Hi, I’m Nancy from Company X, and I’m looking to speak to the person who may handle telecommunications. 

Brandon: 

Is that you or always? 

Brandon: 

It never failed when I was walking into a building walking down the hallway. Always greet the person. 

Brandon: 

I’m friendly anyway. Always greet that person because nine out of 10 times that’s the person at the front desk or the person in charge there in that company. 

Brandon: 

It’s just amazing. I’m literally getting chills because it happened all the time. 

Brandon: 

So when you were walking in, you’re saying you would always greet the person that you saw, right? 

Brandon: 

So if I’m walking in the building, were in the parking lot high cardio. 

Brandon: 

Well, getting on the elevator. Hey, how was your day walking down that hallway? 

Brandon: 

Maybe they were in another office. And then you see them. They’re like, Oh, she’s friendly. 

Brandon: 

She’s professional. 

Brandon: 

That’s what. Do you think that not? 

Brandon: 

Do you think that not from going while you were in sales in the cleaning business, regardless in the same but in a different thing. 

Brandon: 

But do you do you think that not knowing the rules helped you just do whatever you needed to do instead of being in this box. 

Brandon: 

That said, Hey, Nancy, you know, you go through some training. 

Brandon: 

Here’s how you do it. 

Brandon: 

You can’t do this. 

Brandon: 

Can’t do that. 

Brandon: 

Can’t do this right. 

Brandon: 

I do think there’s There’s a lot of validity to that. 

Brandon: 

And it’s it’s being authentic being you. 

Brandon: 

You can get the tools right. 

Brandon: 

You can get the training, but then put it into your own words. 

Brandon: 

And how do you want to be treated? 

Brandon: 

You know, I always think about that customer experience. 

Brandon: 

Do you want a graph person or do you want the friendly person and the person who asked questions? 

Brandon: 

And how is your day? 

Brandon: 

Not a lot of people ask that anymore, you know? 

Brandon: 

Hi. How are you? 

Brandon: 

Was that ever misinterpreted? 

Brandon: 

Probably. 

Brandon: 

Uh huh. 

Brandon: 

But you are so focused on the sale, you just kept going. 

Brandon: 

You guys going? 

Brandon: 

Yeah. And yeah, Just looking for some information. Taking some notes sometimes. That was my objective. Just going in. Hi. Could I get a name? 

Brandon: 

Okay. Do you know who handles that? Do you know a good time to schedule an appointment? And then sometimes I would go in for? 

Brandon: 

Can I speak to them now? Dependent on the the mood. 

Brandon: 

Why? 

Brandon: 

How long did it typically take you to close a deal? 

Brandon: 

A lot of times right on the spot. 

Brandon: 

That was the goal. 

Brandon: 

Um, and then other appointments or other instances. 

Brandon: 

It would take an appointment. 

Brandon: 

A scheduled appointment. So was pretty quick. 

Brandon: 

Were you selling quality, or are you trying to sell price meaning lower price than the competitors? 

Brandon: 

Like what was? 

Brandon: 

Did you have that advantage, or was it really just? 

Brandon: 

Hey, we have a better service. 

Brandon: 

It was quality. 

Brandon: 

It was in price. 

Brandon: 

We weren’t the least expensive. 

Brandon: 

It was quality. And this was also the time when I can’t believe all this is coming back. It’s called portability, and that’s when you could take your 800 number from one company to another. 

Brandon: 

Prior to that time, you couldn’t. 

Brandon: 

So you were locked into that telecommunication provider, so that was a big deal. 

Brandon: 

And it’s just about, you know, Ma Bell. 

Brandon: 

Remember, things were breaking up. 

Brandon: 

That was also at the time where there were other options. 

Brandon: 

So you weren’t blocked into just one choice, just vanilla. 

Brandon: 

And, you know another option. 

Brandon: 

Professional baby. 

Brandon: 

Save a couple of pennies here and there. But it wasn’t, like, 50% off. 

Brandon: 

So you do the telecom thing for how many years? 

Brandon: 

I think three. 

Brandon: 

And then you go to medical devices. And was that just Was that just something you were interested in? 

Brandon: 

Was it more money? Was it more exciting? Did you have a reason? 

Brandon: 

Yes, More exciting new challenge. Uh, long term. I want it a new challenge. 

Brandon: 

That was quote recession proof. 

Brandon: 

So that was my goal. So I was looking at the farm of the medical device, and then I interviewed with a dental company, and I really liked what they had to offer. 

Brandon: 

So I was with them for 21 years. 

Brandon: 

The same company for 21 years. 

Brandon: 

How often does that happen today? 

Brandon: 

Not often at all. 

Brandon: 

No. Now, that was very purposeful. 

Brandon: 

Meaning it was very calculated in the sense that you said was Was there something that you were that had happened in your past, that you had learned that recessions? 

Brandon: 

You know, you lose your job or business goes down or you hadn’t been in business. 

Brandon: 

Now you’re in business. 

Brandon: 

Nine years like what? 

Brandon: 

What was it that you believed that that was a very was the really the fundamental thing that you were looking for? 

Brandon: 

It’s a really good question. It was probably age and experience, So I don’t recall what specifically, but I know that was the focus. 

Brandon: 

It was a recession proof. 

Brandon: 

And I would talk about that on the interview. 

Brandon: 

You told him that? You said they’re like, Hey, Nancy, why are you interested in this job? 

Brandon: 

That was one of the reasons. And it was, You know, I’m looking for long term. I’m looking for where can I grow Grow, You know, with my knowledge grow, climb the ladder, which I did different experiences, different roles. 

Brandon: 

So and I added the recession proof. 

Brandon: 

So when I took that job, it was 1997. 

Brandon: 

So I’m not sure if what was happening at that point in the world, but that that was what I was looking for. 

Brandon: 

I wanted the company car, one of the expenses. 

Brandon: 

I wanted bonuses, You know, I wanted it all wanted to travel. 

Brandon: 

And the bureaucratic, whatever you wanna call it didn’t really bother you. 

Brandon: 

Well, it was a little bit different So I was used to the telecom bureaucracy, and, um, it’s funny. 

Brandon: 

So I went from M C I to a t and T in Hawaii. 

Brandon: 

In Hawaii. 

Brandon: 

You were living in Hawaii? 

Brandon: 

Yep. 

Brandon: 

I got recruited by At and T is like Okay, sure. 

Brandon: 

Um, So I did that. 

Brandon: 

Oh, my God. So then I started selling. Oh, you’re gonna love this, Brandon. 

Brandon: 

So that was 94 to 96. 

Brandon: 

So I started selling Internet packages when it was the information superhighway, the World Wide web. 

Brandon: 

So I was selling Internet packages to business. 

Brandon: 

You know, I got the tools. 

Brandon: 

I got the training. We didn’t really know what the internet was yet. It wasn’t really anything yet. 

Brandon: 

And at that point, I knew I wanted some type of business online, but I didn’t know what I wanted. And I was really young and no money, you know, with no money, no money. 

Brandon: 

Um, so, yeah. 

Brandon: 

Then I went into mental. 

Brandon: 

I didn’t really answer your question because I thought of that. 

Brandon: 

Well, that’s okay. Uh, well, how did you like Hawaii? 

Brandon: 

Loved it. I loved every second of it. 

Brandon: 

I actually thought I was going to live there forever. 

Brandon: 

But my mother got sick while I was there, and I made the decision to come back to Philadelphia. 

Brandon: 

And that was my God. 

Brandon: 

That’s the culture shock, isn’t it? 

Brandon: 

Yes. Where in Hawaii did you live? 

Brandon: 

I lived on Oahu. I lived about 20 miles outside of Honolulu, and the office was across the from the beach in Waikiki. 

Brandon: 

Honolulu? 

Brandon: 

Oh, man. You know, I watched Waikiki Beach on my surf camera all the time. 

Brandon: 

They got that. They have the most incredible, like, just long Lord waves all day long. 

Brandon: 

All year long, Could you, sir? 

Brandon: 

When you were there? 

Brandon: 

I didn’t. 

Brandon: 

I wish he had. 

Brandon: 

Did you do anything on the water? 

Brandon: 

Yeah, I was on the water. I was on the beach every weekend. 

Brandon: 

I am a beach person and we go to the North Shore. 

Brandon: 

You know, lots of friends who had homes on the North Shore on the beach. 

Brandon: 

And, yeah, when you’re in the military, a lot of my friends were in the military, you know, you get they’re taking care of as they should be. 

Brandon: 

And a lot of friends had it there. 

Brandon: 

So another good webcam Webcam is trans reef dot net to watch their first shendry file. 

Brandon: 

I will have to check that out. 

Brandon: 

John. C H U N s u N o K C H U N s. 

Brandon: 

Yeah, it’s awesome. 

Brandon: 

I need to write that down. Yeah, I watched as all day long I watched. 

Brandon: 

I actually just got back from Santa Cruz before we jumped on here today, but, um, and there were some good waves, but Waikiki Beach just looks way too nice. 

Brandon: 

It’s awesome. 

Brandon: 

How is your surfing going? 

Brandon: 

Uh, it’s going. 

Brandon: 

I’m really sore. Uh, like 13 year old kids who are way better than I am, but, you know, that’s the challenge. So I decided on the way home that I’m just gonna write down in my journal every day that I go, what progress I’ve made. 

Brandon: 

And if I can just do a little bit better, Um, I think will be good. 

Brandon: 

Mainly I’ll be honest. I can stand up. I can surf. 

Brandon: 

I can’t paddle. 

Brandon: 

I’m so tired. Yeah, like I can ride my bike 150 miles a week, and I’m, you know, like hammering it. 

Brandon: 

And I get out there like today. 

Brandon: 

I’m just paddling out to the break. I’m already tired. I can barely get back. But, uh, yeah, So you go from Hawaii to Philadelphia, and now you’re in the medical sales business, dental, dental and which is a nice, uh, industry to be in after I think anybody who’s listening after, like what happens? 

Brandon: 

Like after 35 sometimes usually your teeth start having some issues. 

Brandon: 

But, um, what you call it and you’re in Philadelphia and you purposely pick a recession proof business and at last 21 years and what would be some lessons from those 21 years of? 

Brandon: 

I imagine you started towards the bottom because you were younger and then finished at the top, like, what’s the end to stay in sales that long? 

Brandon: 

What would be three tips on sales besides, besides following up. 

Brandon: 

Okay, well, there’s more to this. 

Brandon: 

So then I moved back to Philadelphia, and then I moved to Hoboken, New Jersey, to take a position at the dental company. 

Brandon: 

Uh, we weren’t wrapping up. 

Brandon: 

I just wanted lessons from the corporate America and see, like I’m gonna because I think there’s I think there’s value in that. 

Brandon: 

In that experience, I mean It’s not for everyone. 

Brandon: 

I mean, you’re a very happy person, having worked in corporate America for, uh, whatever 25 years. 

Brandon: 

I mean, most people aren’t happy, and they come out of that. 

Brandon: 

That’s Joe. 

Brandon: 

Yeah. 

Brandon: 

So not wrapping up our conversation, but just just read or sharing. 

Brandon: 

I went from Hawaii. 

Brandon: 

Total chill, where I had to relax, and I was a minority, right? 

Brandon: 

I was one of the few caucasians in Hawaii, and you also have to assimilate there because not everyone is enamored with Caucasians, especially from the mainland. 

Brandon: 

Yeah, I understand that. 

Brandon: 

So, um then I go to Hoboken, which, let’s just say, in New York City, you know, the hustle and bustle directory, so you have to assimilate there, too. 

Brandon: 

But, um, the same holds true. 

Brandon: 

You know, take your your training, take your authenticity, your personality, and do something that you really want to do. 

Brandon: 

Do something that you’re interested in because it comes across that authentic self. 

Brandon: 

So, um, you know, never give up and never give up by yourself. 

Brandon: 

And, you know, even an account. 

Brandon: 

Just because they don’t say yes the first time doesn’t mean they won’t say yes. 

Brandon: 

The second time and, you know, ask for help. 

Brandon: 

Keep learning. 

Brandon: 

So these are my tips that I’ll say all day, Continue to learn, continue to grow. 

Brandon: 

Continue to challenge yourself because, you know, to to your point, to stay in corporate America for that long and the one company For 21 years, I had different roles in different areas of responsibility and learning how to become a leader learning how to delegate, you know, analyze team building, collaborate. 

Brandon: 

I love to collaborate, and I’m doing that so much in my new career. 

Brandon: 

But all of these things come together. 

Brandon: 

So, you know, I have a question for you. 

Brandon: 

So most people will say what you said, which is do something you’re interested in, in other words, and I don’t know if you mean this, but some people would interpret that as do what you’re passionate about, right? 

Brandon: 

But I haven’t heard anywhere so far that you are passionate about dental equipment. 

Brandon: 

And I’m wondering how you translate in what you’re interested in, what you clearly were interested in something. 

Brandon: 

And I think that’s the point that I’m I’m trying to understand because it’s an important one is what were you interested in yourself that it seems to me that dental sales are dental equipment, necessarily wasn’t. 

Brandon: 

But you found something else in that job that you were interested in. 

Brandon: 

That’s a good point. 

Brandon: 

So I thought that was my passion. 

Brandon: 

I thought that was I mean, I loved it. 

Brandon: 

I thought I was going to retire at this company. 

Brandon: 

I loved what we sold through distributors and called on schools and universities and did a lot of training. 

Brandon: 

I did professional selling skills training. 

Brandon: 

I did new hire training. 

Brandon: 

I did product training from when I was a rep to a manager. 

Brandon: 

So eventually I was managing three divisions to private label in one brand it so that customer interface, I love it. 

Brandon: 

I had a sales team and a marketing team, a dotted line to customer service. 

Brandon: 

So for me, using my left brain, my right brain creativity, training new reps and seeing them flourish, training our distributor partners, training factors who were in post graduate school and teaching them how to use the products for their future practice. 

Brandon: 

So though I love that I absolutely love it, I love the training. 

Brandon: 

I love the people part. 

Brandon: 

I love negotiating. 

Brandon: 

I love, you know, getting that sale, building the business. 

Brandon: 

So all of those things I can take with me no matter where I go. 

Brandon: 

But I think that’s really important. 

Brandon: 

That’s very, very I don’t want I’m interrupting you because I think it’s really important because there’s a lot of messages out there, especially on the World Wide Web, that that say, Do your passion and, you know, build a business and that’s what you should do. 

Brandon: 

And I think that’s a very, um, I think it’s a superficial thing to say. 

Brandon: 

I’ll say that. 

Brandon: 

I think there’s no depth to that comment like That’s easy, right? 

Brandon: 

Like, Oh, Nancy, like you like to What do you like to do? 

Brandon: 

Do you bike? 

Brandon: 

I do like to bike. 

Brandon: 

I like to run yoga. 

Brandon: 

Okay, Yeah, Nancy, you’re a runner. 

Brandon: 

Figure out how to build a business and do running, but But that’s just easy, right? 

Brandon: 

And that’s just so surface. 

Brandon: 

What you’ve said is really important, and it’s actually something that I find the same is that your interest and what you found important wasn’t necessarily the product or the thing or even your passion, because clearly has nothing to do with running other than or spiking or it’s nice to have nice teeth, but the it has nothing to do with that. 

Brandon: 

So if you when When you When people hear that, I think it’s important to understand that it doesn’t mean that if you knit Ron bike, surf fish I don’t know. 

Brandon: 

What else do people do? 

Brandon: 

I don’t know what else people do. 

Brandon: 

Hike, Um, snorkel. 

Brandon: 

Whatever. 

Brandon: 

Croquet doesn’t mean that you go run into that like find something else that’s deeper, like peel back the onion of yourself and really understand who you are versus identifying with this thing that you identify as your passion, and then you believe that you have to make money. 

Brandon: 

I’m not saying that you can’t. 

Brandon: 

I’m just saying at least do some introspection. 

Brandon: 

What do you think? 

Brandon: 

I think you are 100% accurate, and I heard that term for years to, and I really did enjoy that career. 

Brandon: 

Actually, all of my career’s I really like them. 

Brandon: 

And when I heard that follow your passion, it’s like, Well, what do I do with that? 

Brandon: 

You know what I mean. 

Brandon: 

So I didn’t follow my passion and your passion can change, right? 

Brandon: 

That’s that’s another. 

Brandon: 

Another point I wanted to share today is you change, We change, We age, we get experience. 

Brandon: 

And, you know, I never in a million years thought I would have a clothing brand, right? 

Brandon: 

I just did. 

Brandon: 

And now this is a true passion. 

Brandon: 

Like I love every single thing about it. 

Brandon: 

And because of my prior experience, I took the rest, you know, 100% and I’m all in. 

Brandon: 

Well, I want to talk about that, but, um, I have a tendency to harp on, as you know me over the years to harp on important points, because what’s it take now, like 12 times, or somebody hear something and actually listen or hear it, Um, it doesn’t mean people that you just go out and because you’re a skier, that you think you’re going to do that, that’s just it doesn’t mean you can’t. 

Brandon: 

But you really need to peel back the onion of yourself to understand who you are and what you truly like, not what you appear to like. 

Brandon: 

Or, um, that’s my mom. 

Brandon: 

Who soup supersedes. 

Brandon: 

Did you hear that? 

Brandon: 

Supersedes all silencers. 

Brandon: 

Um, bring her on. 

Brandon: 

No, we’re not. 

Brandon: 

We’re not having Mom on today, but she’s probably listening. 

Brandon: 

Uh, and thanks for the flowers that she sent. 

Brandon: 

But, um, what you call it, I think that that’s important. 

Brandon: 

Here is when something else I’ve been reading about entrepreneurs and studies that have been done about failure and one of the things that people also say, as you know, is fail fast, do all this stuff. 

Brandon: 

And that’s a very superficial thing also to say. 

Brandon: 

And the statistics actually say that if you fail once, you will likely fail again and again and again. 

Brandon: 

And the reason is in the in the studies, this is these are scientific is what I do on the weekend, right? 

Brandon: 

Um read psychology, scientific journals. 

Brandon: 

But I actually enjoy it. 

Brandon: 

And it the science says Nancy, that if you do not have e Q, whatever the right like word is, but self awareness is really what it is and understand your true self understand? 

Brandon: 

And it’s not just this y thing. 

Brandon: 

I’m so tired of hearing like the Y, right? 

Brandon: 

I mean, how many times have you heard that in your entrepreneurship journey, the five wise right? 

Brandon: 

You know what your why it’s deeper than that. 

Brandon: 

Like you got to get to your core. 

Brandon: 

So if you’re listening out there, rewind what Nancy has talked about here because it’s really important. 

Brandon: 

Um, it really is important to understand what you like and identify those things. 

Brandon: 

And I’d also suggest that you know, you can ruin your passion if you try to turn it into a business. 

Brandon: 

So back back to your career in medical sales, what other jobs did you do there? 

Brandon: 

So I was a sales rep, and I had pretty small footprint. 

Brandon: 

I had North Jersey, New York, New York City among island. 

Brandon: 

Then I picked up the New England Northeast. 

Brandon: 

Then I picked up Maryland and D. 

Brandon: 

C. 

Brandon: 

So I had from Maine to D. 

Brandon: 

C. 

Brandon: 

That’s a ton of people, 10 of people. 

Brandon: 

Yep. 

Brandon: 

And then I, uh that’s when I got certified. 

Brandon: 

I was a certified trainer from a chief Global, and I taught professional selling skills in the organization and then the new hire training. 

Brandon: 

And I love that. 

Brandon: 

That was fun, because then I meet all of the new incoming people was at corporate and, you know there was exposure to the Executive C suite and growing that way. 

Brandon: 

And then I started to manage, Uh, that was after a number of years. 

Brandon: 

Then I promote it, and I started to manage people. 

Brandon: 

And that’s when I managed a private, a different brand branded division and then to private label divisions. 

Brandon: 

And we sold domestically and internationally. 

Brandon: 

Well, I’m listening to you. 

Brandon: 

I have a bunch of questions. 

Brandon: 

Of course, my first one is. 

Brandon: 

Is dental work really recession proof? 

Brandon: 

Yeah, well, not right now. 

Brandon: 

Not with the pandemic and pre pandemic pre pre pandemic like, let’s just say normal. 

Brandon: 

Normal recession, right? 

Brandon: 

Like a normal 2000 and eight crash 19 94,001 Crash like, Yeah, eighties, is it? 

Brandon: 

Do people continually do that because of insurance? 

Brandon: 

Or is it? 

Brandon: 

And most dental? 

Brandon: 

Most people don’t have dental insurance really hard. 

Brandon: 

Uh, we’ve tried to get it for our people, is just ridiculously expensive. 

Brandon: 

But, um, is it generally pretty steady business? 

Brandon: 

It’s generally pretty steady. 

Brandon: 

And for example, in 2000 and eight, I remember that a lot of the divisions at the company did get hit hard right, and this is fun. 

Brandon: 

The divisions I managed. 

Brandon: 

I chose to continue to advertise and have that brand awareness, and we were the only division that grew and talk more. 

Brandon: 

Talk more about that because that’s a that’s a really important. 

Brandon: 

It’s counterintuitive for most businesses, and it’s painful, actually, super painful, but important it is. 

Brandon: 

And, you know, it was really great having that autonomy to make these decisions. 

Brandon: 

So it was just something I felt. 

Brandon: 

And I worked really closely with my marketing manager. 

Brandon: 

And, you know, I I came up with the idea of what We came up and I chose to go with it, and it’s just okay, well, we can we can pull back and no one will see us anymore. 

Brandon: 

But we already have this budget, right? 

Brandon: 

The budgets big the previous year. 

Brandon: 

So we had those dollars that are available, and I chose to use them. 

Brandon: 

I always I always try to spend, like, every single penny, maybe a little bit more. 

Brandon: 

And when you are successful, that’s okay. 

Brandon: 

So, fortunately, it worked out When you hit your numbers, people don’t complain and say, Nancy, you and over budget. 

Brandon: 

So, like, yeah, Okay. 

Brandon: 

So keep that in mind. 

Brandon: 

Um But yeah, we continue to advertise. 

Brandon: 

Our competitors did not. 

Brandon: 

And even similar divisions in the organization did not continue to advertise. 

Brandon: 

And they got hit because, you know, dentists are still practicing. 

Brandon: 

People are still getting their teeth done. 

Brandon: 

They’re getting dental work. 

Brandon: 

Maybe people choose not to do elective if they, you know, procedure of five grand, 10 grand, even $2000. 

Brandon: 

Well, if I don’t really need it, I’m not in pain. 

Brandon: 

People won’t do that procedure in a recession. 

Brandon: 

But when you’re in pain, you will do anything to get out of pain. 

Brandon: 

Or, as we used to say, discomfort. 

Brandon: 

But seriously, you know it in your own personal life, right? 

Brandon: 

I know it. 

Brandon: 

You will do anything to get out of pain. 

Brandon: 

So fortunately, that strategy worked out, and, you know it showed in the numbers at the end of the year. 

Brandon: 

That’s a good point. 

Brandon: 

Actually, that’s the difference between an aspirin and a vitamin problem. 

Brandon: 

And you had a you had an aspirin problem. 

Brandon: 

Yeah, and it’s true. 

Brandon: 

And, general, I think is one of those things that people wait till the last minute. 

Brandon: 

But, you know, people are going to have bad teeth through depressions or recessions or whatever that is. 

Brandon: 

So what was the last position you had at the company before you left? 

Brandon: 

Yeah. 

Brandon: 

So that was the one where I was managing. 

Brandon: 

The three divisions had the sales and marketing team, and I did that for 12 years. 

Brandon: 

So what was the moment that you decided that that was over and you are going to do something else? 

Brandon: 

So that was a pivotal moment. 

Brandon: 

Amazing moment. 

Brandon: 

So with my dad, my father was a professional. 

Brandon: 

Wear a suit every day, always wore a button down shirt and slacks, you know, retirement. 

Brandon: 

So after a period of time, my dad had to go into assisted living. 

Brandon: 

My mother had already passed away. 

Brandon: 

So my dad was an assistant living, and he broke his same hip two times in his hand on about 10 to 12 months. 

Brandon: 

So the nurses and aides didn’t want to take the time. 

Brandon: 

And I always stopped that. 

Brandon: 

Didn’t want to take the time to help dress my father. 

Brandon: 

In his desire to tire. 

Brandon: 

They suggest it pull over sweatshirts and pull up sweatpants because it’s easy. 

Brandon: 

And we looked around. 

Brandon: 

I actually had power of attorney over my dad. 

Brandon: 

I do have siblings. 

Brandon: 

We try to find a stylish solution clothing for him. 

Brandon: 

That was easy to get on and we couldn’t find anything. 

Brandon: 

So we went along with the sweatshirt sweat pant type thing, and I realized this. 

Brandon: 

This is a broad problem for caregivers like us or the people actually dressing my dad and for someone with s ALS a disability, a spinal cord injury, you know, rotator cuff surgery. 

Brandon: 

It’s almost limitless. 

Brandon: 

So I knew I could do something. 

Brandon: 

I knew I had the business skills to do it because I was already managing businesses just with someone else’s money. 

Brandon: 

And, uh, my dad passed away in the summer of 2016, and this continued to bother me and I would talk about and think about it. 

Brandon: 

So November 30th of 2017, I literally just walked away for my career, for my contacts from everything that I built and started smarter doubts of clothing and not knowing anyone not knowing anything about design. 

Brandon: 

I went to school for marketing and management, but I knew I could figure it out. 

Brandon: 

That’s what I I do. 

Brandon: 

It’s like I don’t know how. 

Brandon: 

I’ll get two X goal, but I’m going to get there. 

Brandon: 

So, uh, here we are. 

Brandon: 

It’s, what, 2021 yeah, I met you in the beginning in November 2017. 

Brandon: 

So when you before you before you just whatever this date was that you said, How many? 

Brandon: 

How many months? 

Brandon: 

Months previous. 

Brandon: 

Did you set it or did you just like, one day, Mike, drop I’m out. 

Brandon: 

It was kind of like one day Mike drop. 

Brandon: 

So you didn’t. 

Brandon: 

But, you know, I I assume this and I the reason is, I always worry for people. 

Brandon: 

It’s like you as a risk taker. 

Brandon: 

You you take all these huge risk, but then you always worry terribly about people taking the risk because you realize, wow, what a risk it is. 

Brandon: 

And because you actually know what that means. 

Brandon: 

And the people who take it sometimes don’t understand what that means. 

Brandon: 

Did you have some money saved up? 

Brandon: 

Where you like? 

Brandon: 

Okay. 

Brandon: 

I have three years with the money where I can leave for 10 years. 

Brandon: 

I mean, you worked a career so in your head. 

Brandon: 

Where you thinking that at all? 

Brandon: 

Or was it Yeah. 

Brandon: 

Like, did you have an insurance policy basically to say? 

Brandon: 

Or maybe you paid off your house? 

Brandon: 

I don’t know. 

Brandon: 

But like all life doesn’t stop when you when you take the leap, You’re right. 

Brandon: 

It doesn’t. 

Brandon: 

So I mean, I looked around and I did do research, so it’s not as bad as it sounded, but it was, you know? 

Brandon: 

Okay, this this is what I’m going to do. 

Brandon: 

This is what I have to do. 

Brandon: 

And I truly feel like I am being pulled along, like, picture a high air balloon and it’s just pulling me along. 

Brandon: 

This is what I have to do. 

Brandon: 

This is what I was made to do, and I did have a net. 

Brandon: 

So I worked really hard. 

Brandon: 

I was successful. 

Brandon: 

I saved and invest it well. 

Brandon: 

And also, I thought I would I thought it would happen much faster. 

Brandon: 

Uh, important point for everybody because we rewind. 

Brandon: 

Could you say that again? 

Brandon: 

It’s I thought it would happen a lot faster, so yeah, right. 

Brandon: 

It doesn’t happen as fast as we think of bad now and that Yeah, that’s a big one. 

Brandon: 

And I don’t live in the clouds. 

Brandon: 

Even though I said, the clouds are pulling me or the hot air. 

Brandon: 

But I analyzed. 

Brandon: 

I’m someone who analyzes, you know, very driven. 

Brandon: 

But I look at the numbers and however long you think it will take, make it two or three times maybe more, however much money you think you need. 

Brandon: 

234 times. 

Brandon: 

And then now we have a pandemic. 

Brandon: 

Oh my God. 

Brandon: 

Right, So save more. 

Brandon: 

It takes longer. 

Brandon: 

It’s cost more money, you know, finding a factory or whatever you are. 

Brandon: 

Goods and services. 

Brandon: 

It just be prepared. 

Brandon: 

Well, let’s talk about the product for everybody before we we jump into. 

Brandon: 

What? 

Brandon: 

Can you describe exactly what that what smart, adaptive clothing means? 

Brandon: 

Sure. 

Brandon: 

So for the fashion forward person who struggles with dressing, whether it’s from a disability or chronic illness, loss of dexterity, etcetera for an individual or caregiver. 

Brandon: 

We make easy on easy off clothing, and we keep the buttons on the front closure. 

Brandon: 

This blouse is one of mine. 

Brandon: 

Keep the button on the front, placket or closure and on the cuff. 

Brandon: 

So it appears to be traditional, but we use Velcro. 

Brandon: 

Yeah, we saw a Velcro behind every single button. 

Brandon: 

You’re actually wearing that? 

Brandon: 

Yes. 

Brandon: 

Yeah, it looks nice. 

Brandon: 

Thank you. 

Brandon: 

So it’s it’s much easier. 

Brandon: 

And for example, you know, I’ve done presentations for folks in the Parkinson Support group, so someone may have a tremor or loss of dexterity, and this particular person came up to the front of the room. 

Brandon: 

A gentleman put on one of the shirts, and he told us how it took him 15 minutes just to do the one button on his cuff. 

Brandon: 

So imagine the other button and then on the men’s shirt, traditionally seven buttons. 

Brandon: 

So this is a game changer for people and just just their own dignity, Right? 

Brandon: 

That was really what your what your dad struggled with. 

Brandon: 

And I’m sure you and your siblings struggled watching him having to adapt at a time when he’s already struggling in the first place. 

Brandon: 

That’s it. 

Brandon: 

And we’re all about thank you for saying that it’s all about building confidence, leading with style, saving time and frustration. 

Brandon: 

So I want everyone to walk into a room, roll into a room of their wheelchair user, using crutches or an assisted device, and you want all eyes on you. 

Brandon: 

I literally get the chills when I talk about this. 

Brandon: 

So I want people to lead with their style with their clothing and, you know, be the envy of everyone in the room versus wearing a T shirt or a sweatshirt. 

Brandon: 

And people look at you because you’re maybe you don’t have the clothing that you want and what others? 

Brandon: 

Demons appropriate. 

Brandon: 

So it’s all about leaving with style, confidence, dignity, independence and and saving time for the person wearing that shirt or blouse and the caregiver. 

Brandon: 

That’s a huge part of this to the person dressing another person. 

Brandon: 

Well, I have to say that when we did meet, I was very, uh I know you’re very driven, lady. 

Brandon: 

Um, and it was very clear to me that you were determined. 

Brandon: 

I was concerned mainly because I had done a clothing company and still hanging around, but I realized how hard that is. 

Brandon: 

And I remember you’re giving that business plan and showing your early early edition. 

Brandon: 

Uh, let’s call it beta style. 

Brandon: 

Um uh, clothing. 

Brandon: 

And there at the time there were other competitors out there and they’re still maybe at some level, Um, but I think where you are now, which I want to hear about really just perseverance. 

Brandon: 

And And are you styling the Do you have a Well, let’s just go back. 

Brandon: 

Because this is an important part of your story, an important part of the story for everybody to understand that you don’t You don’t have to listen to people that say you can’t do that because you’ve never designed clothing in your life. 

Brandon: 

Or you can’t build software because, well, you have no nothing. 

Brandon: 

You can barely turn on the computer. 

Brandon: 

Or, you know, um, you can’t make coffee mugs because you don’t You don’t have any contacts in in coffee mug making or whatever that is. 

Brandon: 

Right. 

Brandon: 

Um, so let’s just roll back a little bit. 

Brandon: 

You quit the job. 

Brandon: 

What was it like? 

Brandon: 

What do you remember the next morning you woke up when you did the mic drop or you like, Did your heart start pounding or what? 

Brandon: 

Were you like that next morning? 

Brandon: 

No, it’s my heart didn’t drop. 

Brandon: 

I’m just I’m so committed to this that I have no regrets. 

Brandon: 

Zero. 

Brandon: 

Do you remember that morning? 

Brandon: 

Like the next morning? 

Brandon: 

You look like you just left 21 years of 25 years. 

Brandon: 

Really of a corporate career in selling you basically just, like, burned. 

Brandon: 

It’s like burning man, right? 

Brandon: 

They burn the art. 

Brandon: 

You burned your roller, Dex. 

Brandon: 

Right? 

Brandon: 

Although that role index could be good because those people have parents and people who you probably sold to or could sell to. 

Brandon: 

But you basically burn this thing to the ground, and I just that next morning there wasn’t where you were just ready to go or were You was there, ever. 

Brandon: 

Oh, man. 

Brandon: 

What did I just do? 

Brandon: 

I did not have an old man. What did I do? 

Brandon: 

I think I got up and went to CrossFit. 

Brandon: 

I was just so stoked, like the energy running through my body. 

Brandon: 

It was more like that. 

Brandon: 

And oh, I have to buy a car because I had a company car. Oh, yeah, like the rest of us, uh, have to have to pay that payment on the 30th of the month. But, um, that was probably a good experience, and I can’t imagine that you’re you didn’t get the best deal, your negotiation skills. 

Brandon: 

But thank you for that. Yeah, it was. I have to get a car. I have to get a laptop, right cell phone. 

Brandon: 

It was those things, but I’m probably going to cross it first. 

Brandon: 

And it’s funny, because I I lasted as long as I could. 

Brandon: 

So it was the winter. 

Brandon: 

I lasted a month, a little over a month without a car. 

Brandon: 

So I just walked everywhere or took the bus. 

Brandon: 

Public transportation, uber. 

Brandon: 

And that was fun. Like, let’s see how long I can go without the car. 

Brandon: 

And then it was a little for a month. 

Brandon: 

So what do you You got this idea? 

Brandon: 

You’re hugely committed to it. I think you know, one of the takeaways. I would suggest that that you’ve said, and I’m sure you’ll say it more and it will become obvious. Is is that where most people fail in my experience is they just don’t keep going forward. 

Brandon: 

Uh huh. 

Brandon: 

Because they get scared, they get discouraged. 

Brandon: 

Uh, I I don’t I don’t think that we’re superhuman in in any sort of way. 

Brandon: 

I don’t think entrepreneurs, true entrepreneurs, Um, like you’ve proven yourself to be art are everybody’s unique human right and has extraordinary things as a human. 

Brandon: 

But there’s nothing magical other than just having some courage to keep going forward even when you’re embarrassed, right? 

Brandon: 

Like and it’s super hard. 

Brandon: 

You asked me about surfing like it is today. 

Brandon: 

Super hard for two to keep going when there’s a 13 year old kid or or even in a grown adult who can Who is way better than me at in every regard. 

Brandon: 

But as soon as we get on land, you know the game changes. 

Brandon: 

So it’s really about having self awareness, understanding your ego and being able to just keep going because you might not get there as fast as you can. 

Brandon: 

But I think you know, you just you gotta just go. 

Brandon: 

That’s the difference between that’s the difference between people who make it and don’t, um, there’s some other nuances there. 

Brandon: 

So what do you do? 

Brandon: 

You? 

Brandon: 

I mean, did you phone China? 

Brandon: 

I mean, I’m joking here, but not really like, How do you do you? 

Brandon: 

Are you? 

Brandon: 

Do you? So, did you start doing this yourself? How does that? How does building a clothing brand happen? 

Brandon: 

Yes, Um, I agree with everything you just said. You know, we all have our strength, right at different moments, and I think that’s important. So don’t let it. 

Brandon: 

Don’t let someone else’s strength affect you because, you know, you said once you get on land. So I literally did start dialing. You know, Google got on the laptop. 

Brandon: 

Google called. 

Brandon: 

People went out to factories. So my clothing is currently made in Philadelphia. Oh, well, that’s awesome. And you just just you’re going to go over this fast, but it’s an important you got on the Google. 

Brandon: 

Yeah. 

Brandon: 

And you started Googling keywords factories that make clothing in Philadelphia area things like that. 

Brandon: 

I did. 

Brandon: 

And I called my the cleaners. 

Brandon: 

The dry cleaners I use. 

Brandon: 

I was like, Who do you know who does X? 

Brandon: 

They gave me a few names. 

Brandon: 

I call them Who? 

Brandon: 

Do you know who does X so that helped to. So just okay, who do I know who might even be close to this? 

Brandon: 

So that’s what I did. 

Brandon: 

And that’s how I found my first factory and you went and visit you. 

Brandon: 

You just showed up and said, Hey, I’m Nancy. Uh, I want to make some clothing pretty much. 

Brandon: 

And did they say Okay, Nancy, um, do you have a design? 

Brandon: 

Yes, they did. 

Brandon: 

So I did have a design, you know, sketched it out. 

Brandon: 

An idea. I had prototypes. 

Brandon: 

So my original prototypes were clothing that already existed. And then I adapted with my Velcro, and I did different versions of it to see what would work and brought that to them. 

Brandon: 

And, you know, they made me samples, and I chose not to work with that factory. 

Brandon: 

I didn’t like their work. 

Brandon: 

I didn’t like there, which, say, personalities. 

Brandon: 

I I don’t want to work with people who aren’t respectful, right? 

Brandon: 

So it’s you’re in the driver’s seat when it’s your business. 

Brandon: 

You don’t have to work with people who are not nice. 

Brandon: 

Yeah, I totally agree. 

Brandon: 

Uh, that’s our advantage. Right? 

Brandon: 

Um, how did you understand about stitching and the different types of stitching and things like that to look for? 

Brandon: 

Or just as a fashion aficionado from corporate America who probably were nice things every day. 

Brandon: 

You just understood good quality clothing, Mostly the latter, and a little bit. 

Brandon: 

Some understanding about the stitching, You know, it wasn’t I didn’t grow up a seller, but it was you know what? 

Brandon: 

What do I like? 

Brandon: 

What do people I know? 

Brandon: 

Like what quality is out there. 

Brandon: 

What am I looking for? What would I be proud to have? Someone Where and then trying it out. 

Brandon: 

Just having people try it before I did anything, you know, try to samples and prototypes and tweak it. 

Brandon: 

Where need be feedback. 

Brandon: 

Ask for feedback and take the feedback. 

Brandon: 

How did you get? Ah, how do you figure out sizing? 

Brandon: 

That’s, like, super hard. 

Brandon: 

It is super hard. 

Brandon: 

It’s still work in progress. 

Brandon: 

I haven’t, you know, sizing with, well, expanding the sizing for different body types. 

Brandon: 

So trying it, trying it on different bodies and then coming up with, you know, quote an average of what would fit someone. 

Brandon: 

How did you, um, have you figured out the inventory, or can you do on demand or how does it work? 

Brandon: 

I should just ask like, uh, you know, is it on demand order and then custom or you having to buy inventory? 

Brandon: 

I buy an inventory and hold inventory. 

Brandon: 

So there are many, many shirts and glasses, so I I sell online. 

Brandon: 

I sell on my site and other e commerce site. 

Brandon: 

So I do have some wholesale customers and then e commerce where we drop ship does the inventory part scare you? 

Brandon: 

Sometimes, Um, you know, you want the right. 

Brandon: 

You want to have inventory when someone wants it. 

Brandon: 

Right. 

Brandon: 

So, uh, sometimes there’s a real answer. 

Brandon: 

I mean, I’m about to continue to build it because I have some new clients, so you you have to have it right? 

Brandon: 

Someone can’t buy it if you don’t have it. 

Brandon: 

Yeah, I’m just I’m thinking through because inventory in the clothing business is really hard. 

Brandon: 

My brother and I got caught with it, um, building custom shirts, fishing shirts and then ultimately decided that we were if we were going to get any cash flow, we’re gonna have to do T shirts. 

Brandon: 

And they were going to have to be on demand, which is effectively what we did design wise because we found it so hard to guess what someone was gonna like. 

Brandon: 

And the margins are they’re extraordinary in clothing. 

Brandon: 

I mean, they really are extraordinary until you factor in the 92 boxes that are in your mother’s garage. 

Brandon: 

And that didn’t didn’t pay for yet. 

Brandon: 

And you figure out that your margin might might be close to break even. 

Brandon: 

So I’m just I’m curious how you’re managing that it’s a work in progress. 

Brandon: 

So, yeah, it’s a work in progress. 

Brandon: 

So I you know you have to buy X quantity to even get on the radar of the factory, right? 

Brandon: 

So it’s it’s small batch we’ll call it. 

Brandon: 

I’ve never used this term with my brand before, but slow fashion. 

Brandon: 

So it’s not like an H and M where you’re they’re buying thousands and thousands of units and someone wears it three times. 

Brandon: 

I just heard that number today. 

Brandon: 

Another webinar. 

Brandon: 

Somebody wears it three times. 

Brandon: 

What’s that mean? 

Brandon: 

So I get an H and M. 

Brandon: 

Okay, so according to the industry, someone who buys H and M only wears that garment three times, which is why it’s so inexpensive. 

Brandon: 

The quality isn’t there. 

Brandon: 

Right at the seams aren’t as tight because it’s it’s like Let’s go fast. 

Brandon: 

Fashion is use it and tossed it after a couple of times, and today I heard three. 

Brandon: 

Wow, I’m not. 

Brandon: 

I’m not a fan of that, but But I understand some people may may do that. 

Brandon: 

Are you focusing? 

Brandon: 

I mean, in today’s day and age, going direct to consumer on the Internet, ultimately is that biggest. 

Brandon: 

What should I say? 

Brandon: 

The most profitable way to do it. 

Brandon: 

But it’s also hard to get your name out there, and you sort of need to go through wholesalers and distributors. 

Brandon: 

So, are you doing a hybrid model right now? 

Brandon: 

Yes, yes, absolutely. 

Brandon: 

So we sell on smart, adaptive clothing dot com, and then I have a wholesale account in London and or here in the US and a couple more coming soon? 

Brandon: 

Well, that’s awesome. 

Brandon: 

Said tell me if you’re willing to talk about, um, you were going to sell through a T V manufacture are What was it called? 

Brandon: 

BBC BBC. 

Brandon: 

I didn’t want to say it. 

Brandon: 

I wanted you to say it. 

Brandon: 

Make sure we’re allowed to say it. 

Brandon: 

So you went to you were going after Q v C. 

Brandon: 

And I remember getting your plan and we went back and forth. 

Brandon: 

You know that your pitch dark, Um, ultimately, it sounded like you got the you got the opportunity, but maybe because of the requirements on inventory or what happened, or how was that? 

Brandon: 

Let’s just start. 

Brandon: 

How was that experience? 

Brandon: 

It was great for me, So I don’t know if I can say it either. 

Brandon: 

Um, but I already said that Q V c. 

Brandon: 

So they had a search, and they call it the big Fine search. 

Brandon: 

They’ve done that for a few years. 

Brandon: 

They did it this year and last year. 

Brandon: 

And in the big fine search, they’re looking for new and innovative products that help improve someone’s life. 

Brandon: 

It was a global search, so I submitted a video you had to submit a video and images of your product, so I was so fortunate of the thousands of people companies that submit it, I was chosen. 

Brandon: 

I was selected to pitch at their headquarters outside of Philadelphia, too. 

Brandon: 

Some of their senior VPs and buyer excuse me buyers apparel and yeah, that chain. 

Brandon: 

So I did pitch that they kept a sample, but I did not make it to the next level, which was to come back, you know, have further discussions with the buyers. 

Brandon: 

So for me, that’s that’s still a goal of mine. 

Brandon: 

That’s a not if it’s when, and I think that platform Q V C would just be amazing to get in someone’s home who could benefit from smart, adaptive clothing and make their life easier, make dressing easier in a stylish way and build that confidence and dignity. 

Brandon: 

Yeah, I think that, um I thought that you’d be a great fit for the For that I mean your brand. 

Brandon: 

There would be no, like the people who the buyers, that buyer personas that I’ve seen come out of the Q V C and Home Shopping Network. 

Brandon: 

I’ve had some other people who have gone on there and and done well, but I thought you were a good match from there. 

Brandon: 

But as we’re as we’re talking, Nancy, I’m wondering for your brand If an infomercial isn’t a great route on Sunday morning, cheap air time, local cable channel actually believe it or not. 

Brandon: 

Believe it or not, this show is going to eat for not just the podcast anymore. 

Brandon: 

But it’s actually on T. 

Brandon: 

V. 

Brandon: 

And it’s 80,000 homes. 

Brandon: 

Yeah, I’m working on more. 

Brandon: 

Congratulations. 

Brandon: 

Yeah, so pretty cool. 

Brandon: 

But I’m thinking an infomercial for you on Sunday morning like that just seems like the target audience. 

Brandon: 

Would your audience that it’s a good fit for that for that sort of model? 

Brandon: 

Alright, let’s let’s follow up on that. 

Brandon: 

I think that’s a great idea um, because as we’re talking about, I I do think UBC but Q v c as you probably dug into it. 

Brandon: 

It’s not a free deal, right? 

Brandon: 

Like you’ve got to buy all this stuff. 

Brandon: 

And if they don’t sell it, then you got to buy it back. 

Brandon: 

And you can get stuck with a lot of inventory, um, and buy back which which literally can kill a small business. 

Brandon: 

So I think there’s risk there, obviously, in that program, they understand that. 

Brandon: 

And I’m sure they have some way to mitigate that. 

Brandon: 

And I wonder. 

Brandon: 

I’m wondering if you could even ensure that I bet you buy insurance policy for that type of endeavour. 

Brandon: 

You know what I mean? 

Brandon: 

So that you insure against the loss? 

Brandon: 

Um, that’s interesting. 

Brandon: 

Yeah. 

Brandon: 

Uh, well, restaurants do stuff like that, right? 

Brandon: 

Like flood insurance, economic hardship, insurance that you have all that. 

Brandon: 

I’m wondering if you can do that. 

Brandon: 

Um, mhm. 

Brandon: 

So right now you’re selling on your website. 

Brandon: 

You’ve got wholesalers. 

Brandon: 

Q V C s someday gonna come. 

Brandon: 

Maybe an infomercial. 

Brandon: 

Uh, really. 

Brandon: 

I love the infomercial stuff. You know, people might call me old school, but I think that have you have. 

Brandon: 

You go direct to the homes like you used to call what cold calls to the not nursing homes or or I don’t think I don’t know if that’s even played correct anymore. 

Brandon: 

I don’t know what’s politically correct and what’s not but, uh, assisted living homes I have. 

Brandon: 

And I do have an independent rep who also excuse me, has called on assistant living, uh, community, senior communities, etcetera. 

Brandon: 

And, uh, there are also communities for folks with disabilities who live there permanently or, you know, go for the day. 

Brandon: 

So yes, um, we have done that, and that’s that’s been beneficial to and, you know, again in the pandemic, that was a hard stop. 

Brandon: 

Yeah, what if, um, you know, there’s a lot of models where you do the It’s the Mary Kay model, right? 

Brandon: 

Like your your brain would be perfect for the Mary Kay Model two. 

Brandon: 

I think it would, too. 

Brandon: 

I think it really would. 

Brandon: 

I mean, you could do fashion shows at these places and take pre orders and then do 10 of them in a row and then know that your inventory is gonna sell. 

Brandon: 

Excuse me, that’s a good one. 

Brandon: 

too, with a pre order that’s really important to with the pre orders, you know, and having a short time frame. 

Brandon: 

That’s the key, the short time frame of making the product and delivering it it is. 

Brandon: 

But I think you have, really. 

Brandon: 

You have a lot of advantages doing that locally versus shipping it from China. 

Brandon: 

You you’re gonna lose weeks on the ship, and then you could lose weeks in customs speaking from experience. 

Brandon: 

So I think there’s a lot of advantages of that. 

Brandon: 

What, um, I gotta ask this questions completely self serving, But I would I would be. 

Brandon: 

I wouldn’t even be doing my job if I didn’t ask. 

Brandon: 

Like was that was building a business plan in the beginning, which I hammered the hell out of you and a lot of other people to do. 

Brandon: 

What was that helpful? 

Brandon: 

It was so helpful, and believe it or not, popped up on my screen yesterday. 

Brandon: 

I still have the original one. 

Brandon: 

It was so helpful. 

Brandon: 

So anyone listening, Brandon is not paying me. 

Brandon: 

Take his course, follow him. 

Brandon: 

You already are. 

Brandon: 

Do the work. 

Brandon: 

Do the pitch deck. 

Brandon: 

It’s proven he’s proven it. 

Brandon: 

I’m a believer I mean, we have been friends, followers, you know, For what, 3.5 years now. 

Brandon: 

So I’m a believer. 

Brandon: 

Do it? 

Brandon: 

Helps it. 

Brandon: 

What did it help? 

Brandon: 

What did it help? 

Brandon: 

It broke it down for me. 

Brandon: 

So it 13 slides, right? 

Brandon: 

That’s it. 

Brandon: 

You’re not I’m not. 

Brandon: 

I’m not paying you for this. 

Brandon: 

So don’t don’t over sell it. 

Brandon: 

But, um, I’m joking halfway, Uh, but that that’s the impression it made on me. 

Brandon: 

Because since this was brand new for me, I needed that road map. 

Brandon: 

I needed to take the guesswork out of it, because the guesswork is where it becomes overwhelming. 

Brandon: 

This broke it down again. 

Brandon: 

He’s not paying me but 13 steps. 

Brandon: 

This is it. 

Brandon: 

The shorter the better. 

Brandon: 

Don’t put so many words on each slide. 

Brandon: 

And I think of that your words are in my head. 

Brandon: 

Every time I see a presentation, use the logos, you that it works. 

Brandon: 

What? 

Brandon: 

And then you just I remember, uh, I didn’t pull up your original business plan when we first started, but you were able to dust that thing off and use it for your pitch deck as well. 

Brandon: 

When you did. 

Brandon: 

Q V C specifically when we when we were working on that? 

Brandon: 

Yes, exactly. 

Brandon: 

Yeah, and just freshened it out. You know, I had grown. I had a logo at that point and images. 

Brandon: 

So it’s it’s the foundation to sum it up. 

Brandon: 

It’s the foundation the building blocks to get you started, because the hardest part sometimes is starting. 

Brandon: 

Just take that first step you won’t know unless you try. Just take the first step and nothing’s perfect. Don’t wait for Perfect Perfect isn’t real, and you’ll tweak it as you go. 

Brandon: 

What what’s your price points? 

Brandon: 

$79 for both the men’s and the women’s shirts. 

Brandon: 

Are you only doing shirts or you’re doing bottoms or other things currently, shirt. 

Brandon: 

So it was about to lunch a short dress, which is right here. 

Brandon: 

Um, it’s periwinkle lavender and a black one. 

Brandon: 

So I want launched them last year at Philadelphia Fashion Week, And, um, this is a good story, Not really, but yes, it is. 

Brandon: 

So I launched Philadelphia Fashion Week, and then a couple days later I went to a trade show in L. 

Brandon: 

A. 

Brandon: 

And this was a trade shell. 

Brandon: 

That’s another good point where it focuses on, caters to folks with disabilities and their caregivers. 

Brandon: 

So I went there with all of my glasses and, sure, it’s clothing racks, the short dress, and someone stole one of my samples. 

Brandon: 

What? Well, that’s sort of a compliment in many ways, right? Right. That’s why I was saying It’s a good story, but it’s not, but it is. 

Brandon: 

So I was so upset, sick to my stomach upset. 

Brandon: 

But at the same time, I had to talk myself out of it, and I said, Okay. 

Brandon: 

Proof of concept. People liked it so much. They stole short tracks, so spend the pandemic it like a week later. 

Brandon: 

So I haven’t gone into production yet just because, as we’re talking about with inventory dollars, every piece, every widget means X. 

Brandon: 

And, you know, people weren’t buying a lot of short dresses and outfits this past year. 

Brandon: 

So it’s being smart, you know? 

Brandon: 

I’m trying to make smart decisions, so that will be coming soon. 

Brandon: 

That will go into production soon. 

Brandon: 

Yeah, once we come out of this well, it sounds like you’re in good shape. 

Brandon: 

What have you been? 

Brandon: 

Have you What? What have you been working on during the pandemic of your Web sales been strong and really working on that channel? 

Brandon: 

Yes. So, um, sales have been good. 

Brandon: 

They’ve been strong, and I started selling on one of my websites that started I E commerce sites September of last year. 

Brandon: 

And it’s a new marketplace for folks with disabilities or have trouble dressing. 

Brandon: 

It’s health style, beauty, etcetera and collaborating with some colleagues. 

Brandon: 

This is really fun. 

Brandon: 

So last year, think last April, we started, and we have an international call. 

Brandon: 

So my colleague, the wholesale account in London and a colleague in Milan, Italy. 

Brandon: 

She is a personal stylist image consultant. 

Brandon: 

We have international calls on a quarterly basis, and we have a different topic. 

Brandon: 

So the next one coming up in May is about shoes, adaptive shoes for someone who may struggle with dressing. 

Brandon: 

And we had pants, we had slacks, we had one about the three of us, and it’s growing our community. 

Brandon: 

So I’ve been doing a lot of collaborating that way and lots of podcast interviews, working on some new designs. 

Brandon: 

So I’ve been very busy. 

Brandon: 

Sounds like a mastermind, doesn’t it? 

Brandon: 

Well, is that what it is when you get together? 

Brandon: 

do that? 

Brandon: 

The tax? 

Brandon: 

Yeah, yes, it is. 

Brandon: 

And it’s really nice because we have the guest speakers. 

Brandon: 

So we’ll have a guest speaker from at least two brands and then a consumer who would consume that product, whether it’s black shoes, et cetera. 

Brandon: 

So there’s real life interaction. 

Brandon: 

And then the attendees have time to ask questions and get to know each other and, you know, build the community that way with one another. 

Brandon: 

Um, yeah, it’s, you know, it’s I’m just going to continue with networking. 

Brandon: 

That’s something else that’s really important in your business in my business. 

Brandon: 

So March of last year I was at an event for a film festival focused on folks with disabilities. 

Brandon: 

It’s called real Abilities. 

Brandon: 

The next one is the end of this month. 

Brandon: 

So I met someone there. 

Brandon: 

A singer songwriter followed up with her. 

Brandon: 

We’ve become friends and collaborated. 

Brandon: 

So now we have, um, similar colleagues were all friends. 

Brandon: 

So this woman, her name is Laci. 

Brandon: 

Check her out loud music. 

Brandon: 

She’s amazing. 

Brandon: 

And she just did a video a couple of months ago, featured my blouse on the dancer and my friend from Milan, colleague friend from Milan did the styling and Blackie and Angela Stylist. 

Brandon: 

They just want an independent film festival for the indie film festival. 

Brandon: 

So Network you never know. 

Brandon: 

I mean, who knew that would happen in the Pandemic? 

Brandon: 

And it’s continuing that way. 

Brandon: 

That’s awesome, Thank you. 

Brandon: 

It’s super exciting. 

Brandon: 

You just never know. 

Brandon: 

I mean, we met in passing at a function we literally spoke for, like, 30 seconds. 

Brandon: 

So in your entrepreneur experience so far, you’re a very motivated person, which, which is what it takes. 

Brandon: 

But has there been any time your your solo founder have there been times when you wished you had a co founder? 

Brandon: 

Or do you have someone you lean on? 

Brandon: 

Or you know what’s been your experience so far with that? 

Brandon: 

Because being a solo founders are it is hard. 

Brandon: 

Um, it helps again with that networking leaning on your colleagues and friends, you know, get advice. 

Brandon: 

Mentor ship. 

Brandon: 

It’s helped me. 

Brandon: 

I never had a mentor before I started the business, and it’s really been great. 

Brandon: 

I’ve had mentor in apparel and clothing and not, you know, just your business mentor. 

Brandon: 

So it has been hard. 

Brandon: 

It would be nice to have a bigger team and perhaps, uh, you know, have an investor or a co founder at some point. 

Brandon: 

I don’t know. 

Brandon: 

I’m not ready for that right now, but it is nice to have a team and to split up responsibilities because there’s there’s so much work to be done. 

Brandon: 

So at this point, it’s prioritizing what needs to be done, What will move the business forward. 

Brandon: 

So definitely needs some some people on the team at some point. 

Brandon: 

So with everything that needs to be done, how do you price? 

Brandon: 

How do you What’s your method? 

Brandon: 

To prioritize that every morning, like you wake up. 

Brandon: 

Is there a plan? 

Brandon: 

Is there a list? 

Brandon: 

Is there? 

Brandon: 

What’s your, uh What do you want to call it? 

Brandon: 

Uh, what’s your weapon? 

Brandon: 

That used to sort of make it all happen? 

Brandon: 

How much time do we have? 

Brandon: 

As much as it takes to describe it. 

Brandon: 

Excuse me. 

Brandon: 

And that was a little tongue in cheek. Excuse me. 

Brandon: 

So I do have a plan. I do set goals, and I like to set an annual goal right monthly. 

Brandon: 

What am I trying to do, break it down weekly and really just focus on breaking it down because if the goal is to lofty and without actions that I can take, it won’t happen. 

Brandon: 

It just it slides away because there’s always another email. 

Brandon: 

There’s a phone call. 

Brandon: 

There’s a text. 

Brandon: 

Literally. 

Brandon: 

There’s an instagram post, right? 

Brandon: 

So it’s it’s breaking down the goals. Okay, What are we trying to do? What needs to be done and what’s, you know, thinking of the future to that three months, six months next year. 

Brandon: 

What what other accounts? 

Brandon: 

Wholesale accounts, etcetera. 

Brandon: 

Do I want to build a business and then kind of coming back? 

Brandon: 

And how do I build that? 

Brandon: 

Okay, then I need inventory. 

Brandon: 

So it’s It’s literally prioritizing each of those things and what is needed under that Bill o points under that and just not to sound corny. 

Brandon: 

But this just came into my mind. 

Brandon: 

How do we get an elephant? 

Brandon: 

One bite at a time, and you and and it sounds like, but I want to make sure it’s true is that you set time aside every month or a week or a year in a shutdown, or whatever you want to call it to define what these things are. 

Brandon: 

So you you, you set five hours on a certain day to do this, and that’s all you do. 

Brandon: 

Or is it something different? 

Brandon: 

I tried to do that. 

Brandon: 

The five hour day doesn’t always work out, but I I will have that of being very asked. 

Brandon: 

I will have that goal where maybe Monday is marketing and Tuesday’s social media etcetera. 

Brandon: 

And then also build time in for, you know, the podcast and interviews and that, and schedule that on a, you know, maybe two days. 

Brandon: 

I have time for that. 

Brandon: 

A couple of hours. 

Brandon: 

This time here is dedicated. 

Brandon: 

If something comes up, I can do the podcast then because otherwise the business is driving you like a cat swinging the cat around on the tail. 

Brandon: 

Oh, I don’t do that. 

Brandon: 

So, you know, um, that’s good to know. 

Brandon: 

But you know what I mean? 

Brandon: 

Where the dog wags the tail of the Yeah, So I’m joking because I possibly could potentially be doing that in my office sometimes. 

Brandon: 

Mhm. 

Brandon: 

Yeah, but it’s hard. 

Brandon: 

So have I need my goals that can’t speak for anyone else. 

Brandon: 

I need my goals to achieve them, because if you don’t have them, you’re not going to achieve them. 

Brandon: 

If it’s just like in your mind, then the phone rings. 

Brandon: 

It’s out of your mind. 

Brandon: 

So try and they get as it’s bulletproof as you can. 

Brandon: 

You know, try and set yourself up for positive experience to win. 

Brandon: 

Do you tell anybody about these things? 

Brandon: 

And so I mean, you haven’t Children with me. 

Brandon: 

I’m not saying you should or can. 

Brandon: 

You can or, um but do you have anybody who’s like, Hey, Nancy, ring a ding ding? 

Brandon: 

It’s the 30th of the month. 

Brandon: 

Did you hit that number or do you do that? 

Brandon: 

Really? 

Brandon: 

Good question. 

Brandon: 

So a little bit of both. 

Brandon: 

So I do have a new mentor, So we’re talking about that pretty deep dive. 

Brandon: 

And then I do have some colleagues that I’ve already had in this industry, and we’ll talk about things, you know. 

Brandon: 

I’ll mention my goals, what I’m trying to do, and they’ll ask about it, follow up and then for me, you know, the biggest thing is I know it. 

Brandon: 

I’m here every day. 

Brandon: 

I know if the goal is met or not. 

Brandon: 

Excuse me because you can fudge things with other people, right? 

Brandon: 

But you can’t fudge things with yourself, so definitely put it out there too, You know, a trusted advisor, friend and colleague. 

Brandon: 

Someone in a similar position. 

Brandon: 

Your friend loved one, and, you know, just revisit your goals and check them off. 

Brandon: 

I like to check them off. 

Brandon: 

I’m not one who scratches them off. 

Brandon: 

Some people do that. 

Brandon: 

I like to check. 

Brandon: 

Yeah, that actually really releases dopamine in your brain. 

Brandon: 

So checking them is actually good, but crossing them off the same thing but whatever, which I whatever you do to get that dopamine rush is important. 

Brandon: 

One quick hack for people who are listening out there who say, Well, Nancy, that’s all great. 

Brandon: 

Um, you’ve been in business a while. 

Brandon: 

Uh, your your hard charger and you’ve got all these mentors, but I don’t have that. Well, here’s a quick hack. Hire yourself a virtual assistant for really cheap. 

Brandon: 

Write down your goals and tell your virtual assistant that on the 30th of the month they need to You are going to have a phone call and they’re going to do that. 

Brandon: 

Now I have more than I have Aguila and and she is magical. 

Brandon: 

And she is She is way beyond a virtual assistant. 

Brandon: 

Um, I don’t know what we’ve been very hard to describe a title for JIA because she does everything and sort of keeps me straight. 

Brandon: 

Um, but speaking of keeping straight, that’s the important thing is she’s like, Hey, we use tremolo and she puts a date. 

Brandon: 

Now we agree on that date, we do a Monday meeting and we go over everything every Monday and she’ll say, Is this realistic? 

Brandon: 

And I’ll say no or yes, and then we’ll negotiate and because you’ll say, Well, you can do that because X y Z and then that’s that’s how we manage it. 

Brandon: 

And then if it’s not done, I haven’t got lit up to go. 

Brandon: 

I actually did before. 

Brandon: 

I did get lit up today, Um, because I’m supposed to upload some videos, some videos that we needed to do editing for, and she needs some that are sitting on this hard drive. 

Brandon: 

But that’s what you need. 

Brandon: 

And if you pay your virtual virtual assistance, you can get you don’t need a G a level you can get. 

Brandon: 

Ah, this isn’t disrespectful to virtual assistant suggest that she is way above that, but you can get a virtual system for pretty cheap and tell them what to do. 

Brandon: 

You’re paying them to do it. 

Brandon: 

And now you’ve got your own accountability. 

Brandon: 

It I’m not going to say it’s a complete substitute for having quote unquote sophisticated or or or or more advanced in mentors. 

Brandon: 

But it does it just about accountability, like we all have accountability. 

Brandon: 

If if I if you don’t say if we didn’t say if I was like Oh, well, um, yeah, I think we’re going to do the podcast on Friday and answer it will be around two. 

Brandon: 

I don’t know, like it doesn’t work right. 

Brandon: 

You need date times and you need someone to say and you’ve got to face those failures. 

Brandon: 

And if you can’t make it, you’ve got to. 

Brandon: 

You got to look at that and say, Okay, I didn’t do this. Why didn’t I do it? And can I do better or what can I change? That’s the important part, Not not the failure that going back to what we were talking about earlier with these studies that say that people who fail in business continued to fail. 

Brandon: 

The ones that don’t are the ones that have deep introspection and can face that and take responsibility for the failure. 

Brandon: 

Um, I mean, if you can’t do that, um, I’m not saying you can’t overcome it, but apparently the science and the odds say that it’s not going to happen. 

Brandon: 

So, Nancy, I’m really proud of what you’ve done. 

Brandon: 

Um, you really took a big leap. 

Brandon: 

And I do remember the first time we met and you gave that pitch deck and it was very clear that it was very clear that it really didn’t matter what I or the other people said that you are going to continue doing it. 

Brandon: 

Not that I didn’t support it. 

Brandon: 

I like I told you, I think it’s an absolutely incredible idea for people who who, you know, really lose their dignity in those in those situations that don’t need to. 

Brandon: 

Um I also was thinking, I’m just gonna say this as a side, but I don’t know that it’s for just old people who can’t do that with dexterity. 

Brandon: 

You know, it could be for someone who has shoulder surgery or something that’s just temporary for a minute, because it is very hard. 

Brandon: 

I had many knee operations and even and my thumb had operation of my thumb and you know, it can be really hard. 

Brandon: 

So I think you have some other use cases. 

Brandon: 

What are three of your largest high percentage tips for people out there who are in or fellow entrepreneur? 

Brandon: 

May I go back to something beforehand? 

Brandon: 

Question, of course. 

Brandon: 

So I just wanted to spring forward. 

Brandon: 

So the clothing You’re right, it’s not just for a senior. 

Brandon: 

It’s for anyone who struggles with dressing themselves or another. 

Brandon: 

So I’ve had teens where the clothing peoples in the 2030 40 50 60 up. 

Brandon: 

And it’s all about the style and leaving with style because style is ageless, right? 

Brandon: 

You can be stylish at 20 or 80 or not so much a 20 or 80. 

Brandon: 

So, um, check us out and three tips. 

Brandon: 

Get a mentor. 

Brandon: 

You can get a mentor at no cost. 

Brandon: 

You know, look for accelerator programs. 

Brandon: 

Look for programs in your area where, you know, sometimes someone wants to be a mentor in their learning, so they’ll offer their services for free. 

Brandon: 

Ask someone you know, a friend of a friend. 

Brandon: 

It’s really important. 

Brandon: 

Ask for feedback, and I won’t go with that follow your passion right but the authentic and truly follow what you want to do. 

Brandon: 

Whatever that maybe maybe it is your passion. 

Brandon: 

Maybe it doesn’t. 

Brandon: 

But as you said, peel back the onion. 

Brandon: 

What are you really trying to do? 

Brandon: 

What are you trying to make a difference and bring joy? 

Brandon: 

So mentor ship. 

Brandon: 

Try and make a difference in your life and everyone else’s life and don’t give up. 

Brandon: 

And this We said this a couple of times today. 

Brandon: 

A lot of times people fail, quote and walk away. 

Brandon: 

Maybe the next step the next week it would have dropped. 

Brandon: 

It would have hit. 

Brandon: 

I don’t don’t give up. 

Brandon: 

So keep trying. 

Brandon: 

Be persistent in a mentor. 

Brandon: 

Follow what drives you like What’s your what drives you? 

Brandon: 

Those are important for me that I think is beneficial, you know, motivation, drive mentorship. Don’t give up and have fun for crying out loud. 

Brandon: 

Make it fun. 

Brandon: 

That’s for I think that’s I’ll give you a bonus. 

Brandon: 

I think it’s not. 

Brandon: 

If it if you can’t laugh and can’t have fun every once in a while, then I would argue you might be in the wrong business anyway. 

Brandon: 

So listen thanks a lot for investing your time this afternoon to share your story. 

Brandon: 

Really excited for what can happen for you in the future. 

Brandon: 

And I know you’re going to make it, so we will stay in touch and maybe we’ll touch base and maybe eight months and see coming out of the pandemic how everything’s going. 

Brandon: 

Thank you so much. Thanks for the support having me here and I could talk for another 10 hours like the time went like that. 

Brandon: 

I know, right? 

Brandon: 

Yes. It’s fabulous. Thank you for your work. You’re really encouraging and you’ve proven it. 

Brandon: 

So that’s also what’s great about you, that you’ve done it, you’re successful. 

Brandon: 

So it means a lot. Well, it hasn’t been easy, and that’s for sure. 

Brandon: 

So I appreciate that. It’s very nice of you. 

Brandon: 

Let’s keep up to speed. And, uh, let’s talk about those ideas that we came up with. I really I really like to. 

Brandon: 

I’m not think more about it for you on the, uh, infomercial. 

Brandon: 

I just think like I think your product is made for that when you start to think you know what you see on infomercials? 

Brandon: 

Besides, uh, what was it Chuck Norris and Susan Somers doing? 

Brandon: 

Uh huh. 

Brandon: 

Does that mean we’re does that? 

Brandon: 

Does that age us? 

Brandon: 

When we say that we actually know what that is? 

Brandon: 

I’ve seen it. I can’t stop watching them in the pandemic. So, yeah, let’s speak one. 

Brandon: 

All right, Nancy, Thanks a lot. Thank you. Appreciate it. 

Brandon: 

Thanks for being generous with your time and joining us for this episode of Build a Business Success Secrets. Before we go, let me ask you a quick question. 

Brandon: 

Are you the type of person who wants to get 100% out of your time, talent and ideas? 

Brandon: 

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Brandon: 

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Brandon: 

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Brandon: 

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Brandon: 

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Brandon: 

Check out the special offer with bonuses for you at be success secrets dot com. 

Brandon: 

That’s B as in business success secrets dot com. 

Brandon: 

And until the next episode, remember, you are just one business plan away. 

Brandon: 

I’m rooting for your success. 

Brandon: 

Yeah. 

Brandon: 

Good job, Greg Caton. 

Brandon: 

Great catching up. 

Brandon: 

Thank you. I agree. It’s I’m a believer and G is awesome. 

Brandon: 

She is. I’m not gonna let you go now. Well, I need a G over here. You do, but you can’t have her. But you do need a gea. It’ll change your life. 

Brandon: 

It will. It will. This was awesome. I mean, I can’t believe time’s up. This is great. Thank you. Truly, for everything you’ve done and support and pushing and challenging, it helps. 

Brandon: 

Yeah, no problem. 

Brandon: 

All right, well, I’m gonna run. 

Brandon: 

Um, I gotta go. Actually. Lift some weights and help my wife. 

Brandon: 

Okay. 

Brandon: 

Enjoy your weekend. 

Brandon: 

You too. Happy spring and happy holidays. Don’t be a stranger. 

Brandon: 

Absolutely not. Okay. Thank you. Financing by. Take care of Vijaya

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