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How John Lee Dumas Turned his Entrepreneurs On Fire Podcast Into a Full Time Business With Over 100 Million Listens

How John Lee Dumas Turned his Entrepreneurs On Fire Podcast Into a Full Time Business With Over 100 Million Listens | Ep. 73 | Business Podcast

How John Lee Dumas Turned his Entrepreneurs On Fire Podcast Into a Full Time Business With Over 100 Million Listens | Ep. 73 | Business Podcast

How John Lee Dumas Turned his Entrepreneurs On Fire Podcast Into a Full Time Business With Over 100 Million Listens | Ep. 73 | Business Podcast

Summary

John Lee Dumas is an Entrepreneur, Founder and host of the award winning podcast, Entrepreneurs On Fire.

With over 100 million listens of his 3000+ episodes, JLD has turned Entrepreneurs On Fire into a media empire that generates over a million listens every month and 7-figures of NET annual revenue 8-years in a row.

In this rare sixty minute interview we talk about his journey from joining the army, leading a team of tanks in the Iraq war, working in commercial real estate, to starting and turning his podcast into a full time business.

John shares things in this episode that he hasn’t shared before.

We also talk about the online media industry, posers on the internet, and how he wrote his new first traditionally published book, The Common Path to Uncommon Success, that’s coming out and can be pre-ordered now. UncommonSuccessBook.com

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Brandon: 

Hello, friends. Welcome to the build a business success Secrets Podcast. I am your host, Brandon. See, White. And today we have an incredible guest, John Lee Dumas from entrepreneurs on Fire. 

John has over 100 million listens over 3000 episodes, and this is incredible episode. It was really cool to get to talk to him and hear a story. If you want to hear how you can build a media company from nothing and the really cool part is John shares that he he didn’t even really know anything about tech or anything. So he goes into this whole story, how he started entrepreneurs on Fire podcast and now this thing. 

It gets a million listeners a month and he’s doing over seven figures net. 

And even the core part is he talks about how much money he’s making, where he makes that money and you can actually find out online and as exciting. 

He’s got a new book coming out that he shares what motivated him to do it. 

What’s in it for you and why you wanna buy his new book, The Common Path Toe Uncommon Success. 

Let’s not waste another second, John Lee Dumas. 

Brandon: 

From entrepreneurs on fire. 

Brandon: 

Welcome to straight talk for entrepreneurs. Whether you’re starting with an idea or growing your business, this show is for you. 

Brandon: 

Learn how to build a strong mindset, a powerful body and a profitable business high. 

Brandon: 

I’m Brandon C. Right, And this is built a business success. Secrets. 

Brandon: 

Hey, John. Thanks for joining, man. How’s Puerto Rico? 

Brandon: 

Brandon? Puerto Rico’s on fire Man, it is paradise. For the last 4.5 years, I’ve got nothing but sunshine and rainbows for days Right on So you I mean, you have a very popular podcast. 

Brandon: 

New was just saying I guess you started that about eight years ago. But when I hear you say that it’s sunny and warm. You came from San Diego. So I mean, is it that much better than San Diego? Pro Sandy equals 44 degrees. Yesterday we still got family back there, so I remind them every day I take a screenshot and I’m like, it was 44 yesterday morning and never, ever doesn’t get below 73 in Puerto Rico and 73 by the way. 

Brandon: 

That’s at 3 a.m. So we’re 82 every day, it’s Ah, it’s paradise. 

Brandon: 

Yeah, Well, God bless you. 

Brandon: 

Because I’m from the East Coast originally, and I don’t like that hot weather. I’m in Half Moon Bay, and it was 44 this morning and the fog just rolled in. But apparently the sun is shining one mile away. My wife said, and it’s 75 so if I want to go visit that later, I will. But But, hey, I wanna just talk about your story a little bit. 

Brandon: 

I know you’ve told it to. A lot of people in my listeners may not have heard it, but you really started your career in the military, got out of the military. 

Brandon: 

And can you just talk a little bit about that? Your own Army dude. At 17, my dad somehow convinced me to apply for an Army ROTC scholarship because he’s like, Yo, if you go and you get an Army scholarship, he’s like all the money that I’ve saved for you for college is yours because you’re not gonna have to pay for any Any college, no tuition, No. 

Brandon: 

You know, whatever I’m like, Oh, my God. I’m 17 years old, like, $30,000. That is a lot of money, and it sounds like all of the money in the world to a 17 year old. You know who is getting a $20 per week allowance for the for his entire life. So I was like, That’s a brilliant idea. Plus, I do come from a family of those who served like my both of my grandfathers were in World War Two, and my one of them actually went on and fought in the Korean War. 

Brandon: 

And eso I came from like that family. 

Brandon: 

My dad was actually a JAG officer for 32 years, so I was like, You know what? I think the ROTC sounds like something I could get into. And, you know, this was 1997 Brandon. So life was good. No riel like wars on the horizon. So I applied. I got a full scholarship ROTC and enrolled at Providence College in Rhode Island as a cadet and spent the next four years training is, you know, quick little spoiler alert. 

Brandon: 

It was my senior year in college when 9 11 happens, so I woke up in the morning to my girlfriend, nudging me saying, Look at this look at the TV and I said, Well, I think things just got riel And sure enough, about a year later, I was in Iraq leading ah tank platoon of four tanks and 16 men in Fallujah or Ramadi and Habaniya, like not not not fun places, no heart. 

Brandon: 

I have some friends who experienced that and that those were hardcore places in the early days for, like, real war fighting and in a tank of all things that the siege of Fallujah was really like. 

Brandon: 

That’s a battle that will be studying the history books like it was it was pretty crazy. 

Brandon: 

And how were you on a rotation, or how many deployments did you dio? 

Brandon: 

I did one deployment for 13 months. The Army usually does like one long deployment where, like the Marines or other ranches, will do like 4 to 6 months. But like more of them personally, I’m just kind of glad that I just got my my tour out of the way and knocked it out. 

Brandon: 

Then I spent the next two years when I got back from Iraq and kind of more of like Garrison operations. 

Brandon: 

And how long did you serve before you got out. Eight years. I was four active for the reserve. So a total of eight years. Right on. And what did you think you were going to do after the Army? 

Brandon: 

You know, I was pretty clueless, to be honest, Brandon, I didn’t really know what I was going to do afterwards. Like everybody was telling me in my whole life. Like basically like you get out as an officer in the Army. The world is your oyster. Everybody wants to hire you like you could do anything you could walk into any door, all complete bs. 

Brandon: 

I don’t don’t know if I could swear in your show. So you can do what? Everyone bullshit, all bullshit. I was lucky to get a job. This is a true story to get a job at John Hancock at 27 years old or 28 years old. Even there was the most entry level job. 

Brandon: 

It was the best one that I could get. 

Brandon: 

The guy that was sitting next to me had the exact same job and he graduated from my school three months prior. So here’s a 22 year old fresh out of college with the exact same job, the exact same salary, the exact same everything. And me like this grizzled war veteran. You know who you know has been there, done that and supposedly has this amazing resume that was just in the exact same entry level job that I literally could have had five years prior or six years prior. 

Brandon: 

That’s when I realized that people a they lie to you be they don’t even know their necessarily lying to you. 

Brandon: 

They just don’t know what the heck they’re talking about. 

Brandon: 

They’re just repeating and regurgitating what other people are saying. 

Brandon: 

Sorry, but my little my little golden doodle gusts over there. 

Brandon: 

Three Jack Russells in my background. 

Brandon: 

But I’ve got a wall, the thing hanging up on the wall that hopefully will dampen that. 

Brandon: 

But we’ll see e just room. Was he usually quiet? But what happened was my My generator just popped on outside because it has to run once a week for maintenance and so popped on. He heard it and he thinks that normally he’s just sleeping. Like right now you can You actually went pretty much right back to sleep. 

Brandon: 

So sure, families show here, So I think that reality is Everybody has a dog. 

Brandon: 

10 month old Golden Doodle. He’s a quarantine puppy. You know, we got him because we couldn’t travel anymore. So we’re like, Hey, let’s let’s get a dog. 

Brandon: 

Yeah, So people, they lie to you, They regurgitate things that our lives, that they don’t even know her lies. They just say it because they’ve heard it from somebody else. Which, by the way, I think is so common. I’ve I’ve caught myself doing that multiple times and I’m like, Wait, um I just saying this because they told you Well, just that, like having four years as an active duty officer in leading men getting out as a captain, which I did like the world to be my oyster, like everybody would want to hire me like and pay me hundreds of thousands of dollars. 

Brandon: 

Instead, I got some $31,000 a year entry level job next to a 22 year old that again, I could have had the exact same job of the day I graduated college. 

Brandon: 

So it was almost just like nothing was improved by my resident and I’m being a little dramatic. 

Brandon: 

I could have gone into certain industries that beneficial, but not really. 

Brandon: 

And, um, it was just again something that everybody’s just the says. 

Brandon: 

That’s just not true. 

Brandon: 

So then what do you decide to do? 

Brandon: 

Because I imagine it doesn’t feel good to sit next to the 22 year old who gets out making the same amount of money. And not that you’re that old right? But let’s just things change from 21 to 28. Your you may not be able to party is hard. I don’t know things like that, right? So party pretty hard. 28. 

Brandon: 

Not as hot, but I made him my bitch. 

Brandon: 

Brandon. I did. I made everybody on that sales floor in my bitch, and at the end of like a month, I was killing everybody’s numbers. So bad, because I just got I was out working them. I wasn’t smarter or better or anything. I just out working them, just making more phone calls, having more talk time, which are the big metrics in corporate finance, that I was the number one sales guy and, you know, randomly and this is how like life works sometimes like the number one sales job was vacated because I personally committed to a manager and they threw me in There is kind of just like, Hey, we’re gonna put John in there. 

Brandon: 

The job is going to go toe one of these people that have been in the job for three or four years. 

Brandon: 

But just to show that, you know, that something that works hard comes in early it is a hard charger getting consideration. And I just crushed the interview process and I made the next person up who made the higher decision realize just there was no, like if you hired anybody else but me, there was he was making a huge mistake. 

Brandon: 

So immediately, I get this high, high, high level job like the most coveted sale job in the company after one month, just because I didn’t, like, crawl into a corner and cry about it, I just said, I’m gonna I’m gonna make them pay for, you know, for this. 

Brandon: 

And that was great. 

Brandon: 

And I spent a year doing that. You know, there’s some pros and cons working in corporate finance. I have some fond memories and some memories where I wanted Thio, you know, jump out of the 43rd window, but at the end of the day, it is what it is. 

Brandon: 

So you made a move. 

Brandon: 

I mean, a move. 

Brandon: 

I don’t know if you remember this website. It was called the latter’s dot com. I mean, I’m actually old enough to remember that. I mean, it might still be around. I didn’t go away. I don’t know. I don’t know. I I don’t use it. So but But I do remember it was really popular back in that in those Internet times, you know, six figures and above jobs, which is kind of the appeal of it, which makes you know, my first understanding of like, Oh, it actually works to have a niche and to be special and screw me not to go into Monster have to cycle through a $30,000 a year jobs to maybe find one big one. 

Brandon: 

So ladders made sense to me. 

Brandon: 

It was cool. 

Brandon: 

I got a job in New York City from ladders, and so I kind of walked out the door from my Boston John Hancock job and never looked back. 

Brandon: 

So what? 

Brandon: 

What job was that? 

Brandon: 

It was an interesting job, actually. So I got the job because I was doing so well as a sales guy and corporate finance. 

Brandon: 

So they knew I could talk the talk and walk the walk and sell. And this was a company that the names almost even escaping. But it was something like gmr tech or something like like techie like that. 

Brandon: 

And they bought old three G cell phone towers and equipments from the U. 

Brandon: 

S. And they resold them to Third World countries because we were, like, all transitioning toe whatever. Like four g l a law, that jazz. 

Brandon: 

And that was my job to, like, literally call like companies and people and politicians and, like South America, Africa, different countries and like, say, Hey, we’ve got these cell phone towers for you. They’re still they say they still work and if you want them, this is the price point. 

Brandon: 

And, you know, it was it was a sales job, and it was It was an interesting company. 

Brandon: 

It was definitely kind of very start up like this. The office was in the old bedroom, not the old bedroom sort of the old apartments off the founder, who, once the company kind of took off he found another. He got another place and just turned the whole apartment into an office. 

Brandon: 

And that was that. Every day I woke up, walked a couple of blocks to Broadway, and, uh, tried to sell allergy. 

Brandon: 

Rusty towers. How long that last? 

Brandon: 

That was about a good eight month job right there. Long? 

Brandon: 

Yeah, it was pretty long. It felt even longer because, I mean, actually happened right during the financial crash. So I was I was working for John Hancock when I looked out the window and I saw people walking out of Bear Stearns with boxes like I could see that happening live like That was visual. They fired 70% of the sales people at John Hancock, and I was like, one of the 30% left, But then they just cut everything that, you know, they cut our commissions, they cut this, they cut that out. 

Brandon: 

And I was like, seeing the writing on the wall of, like, I’m not gonna fight through this like I’m walking out the door like I’m not grateful to have a job like this. 

Brandon: 

This job, you know, suddenly became very unappealing in the new world, and that’s why I took that job down in New York City. 

Brandon: 

But even though this wasn’t specifically the New York City job, a financial job, it still was massively affected. Nobody was willing toe pay money for these things or really, they just couldn’t get credit, even if they wanted to. Credit had completely frozen. 

Brandon: 

So this kind of this job kind of started to the opportunity started to lessen. 

Brandon: 

And the true story, by the way. And I really haven’t told this many, many times, to be honest, but I’m walking in SoHo. It’s a freezing November days like Rain’s coming down. It’s leading, and I’m just miserable. 

Brandon: 

I’m like my job kind of sucks. This weather sucks in New York City. I do love New York City, to be honest with you, but it was just I knew I was going into a long winter, and I wasn’t looking forward to it. I’ve been there for the summer and the fall, which was awesome, but I walked into Hollister and just really to get out of the cold like it was just cold. 

Brandon: 

I walked in there, this whole one story video live. 

Brandon: 

It was live streaming of Huntington beach, which is like, We’re Hollister was found or something, and it was live and people were surfing and swimming and playing beach volleyball. 

Brandon: 

And I’m like, That’s people’s lives right now and like my life is like freezing. 

Brandon: 

I’m going back Teoh a room, not an apartment. I rented a room from like a 60 year old dude that I lived with because that’s in New York City, Man, you have the most funky living situations you can imagine. I’m like, I’m going back to a room toe like sit on my bed and like watching a TV show on my lap, because that’s all I have like to look forward to tonight when I like. That is existing right now. And that’s when I was just, like Click, quitting my job. 

Brandon: 

I’m moving to California. I’ve never lived there, never really been to California very often, but I’m doing it and too much later. 

Brandon: 

I was in a car driving driving west with no job plans. 

Brandon: 

Or what about your city? Was San Diego the destination? So San Diego wasn’t like that moment, The destination, like when I made the decision to move to California, I kind of went back and they started doing some research. And I was talking to one of my roommates about moving to California, and he actually said, Dude, A couple of years ago I went thio to San Diego and specifically we stayed in this town called Pacific Beach and and this was my best friend slash college roommates. 

Brandon: 

So he knew me incredibly well, and he said, That town like, speaks to you like you will thrive and love living in Pacific Beach. 

Brandon: 

And it was honestly, that was kind of like the reason I’m like, Well, I’ll go out there. 

Brandon: 

I’ll get a month to month in Pacific Beach, San Diego, California And if I don’t like it, I’ll move somewhere else in San Diego or I’ll go up the coast, you know, towards Huntington Beach, Newport, Manhattan, wherever I decided to go, and it was really that simple. And so the month to month place I ended up locking in. I ended up not only a I locked in, by the way, because it was the Onley apartment in all of Pacific Beach that allowed month a month. 

Brandon: 

Every other one was at least six months late, so that was the Onley reason I locked it in, but that was the place. I ended up a staying for 18 months and be six months after I moved in, my fiance, Caitlin Erichsen, moved in next door to May. 

Brandon: 

I mean, like, how random is life. That’s life, that is life. Life happens and, you know, I mean, I was reading the thing the other day, John. 

Brandon: 

It said, You know, you’re not supposed to say everything happens for a reason because it’s sort of this cloak A e. 

Brandon: 

I don’t like saying that. 

Brandon: 

I know. But the universe sort of a line sometimes, right? 

Brandon: 

Yes and no. I mean, maybe there’s something that we can have a fun disagreement on, because I honestly believe that like, a lot of people like have that mentality and they think the universe is going to align for them or that things happen always for a reason, and that allows them to toe, like, not really take life by the horns and not like, really take control of what they’re doing. 

Brandon: 

They’re just like, Oh, like that sale went through. 

Brandon: 

But life happens for a reason is like, no, that sale went through because you failed it X, y and Z so like get over yourself, take 100% responsibility and go forward. 

Brandon: 

You know, like you’re sitting at a stop sign somebody slams into you from the back is totally their fault. And you want to just bemoan and say, Oh, my God, like the universe has a line t take me down It’s like no, like, listen, take 100 responsibility. 

Brandon: 

Let’s get this thing fixed, get it off your plate and we want to. The next thing is like, That’s one thing that I really learned the military’s like man, like those people that waited for things that happen to them or always identify things that they thought were happening for certain reasons like, those were not people that I wanted to be on missions, but, like I wanted people to be on missions just like we’re going to create our own destiny. 

Brandon: 

We’re going to create our own reality. We’re going out here now. If the universe is sending us a sign that we don’t like, we’re gonna shift the universe, we’re gonna ignore the universe. We’re gonna break the universe. Who cares? And like, that’s my attitude So like, um, I really happy where I’m at in my life right now. 

Brandon: 

Yes, but I don’t like look at it as it’s because of universal lined or because, you know, everything is meant to happen for a reason. I just don’t buy that philosophy personally, but for people to dio, And if it works for them, I’m happy for you. But that’s just not may. 

Brandon: 

Yeah, I think we agree. I think I’d say a different way, but I think you have to take 100% of responsibility for whatever you do and the people that don’t and use it as an excuse. It turns into You’re probably not going to get that far. Everything. I mean, the officers in the Army that were above me in the chain of commands. 

Brandon: 

The few and I unfortunately had to admit that there’s the few of them. 

Brandon: 

The minority. 

Brandon: 

They took 100% responsibility for everything and their chain of command were fantastic. They were loved by their soldiers. They were successful, they crushed it and the majority unfortunate cause. 

Brandon: 

It’s kind of a human trait who just always trying to pass the buck. If somebody else’s fault is this and that which, by the way, I hate to tell my father under the bus, But I always I always tell him it’s one of his biggest faults is he just can never take responsibility for anything that happens. 

Brandon: 

He’s been very successful despite that all. But it’s a terrible fault, in my opinion. Off Hiss it’s everything, and I disrespect. I just had zero respect for any buddy in my chain of commands that would not take 100% responsibility. 

Brandon: 

Zero. It was just That was the one thing. And that’s when I always said to myself, If I’m as a leader, I’m gonna take 100% responsibility and everything I do in life, I’m taking her 100% responsibility. 

Brandon: 

So every success and failure I’ve had, it’s on May Yeah, I tend to agree, and I can see having someone who didn’t take responsibility how that would definitely affect you. 

Brandon: 

And I take I think, Hey, look, you talked Entrepreneurs. 

Brandon: 

I talk to entrepreneurs. I’ve been an entrepreneur since beginning of time. Not that old, but old enough. You look great, e tell people that was the Neutrogena face cream. I highly recommend it. 

Brandon: 

I always say, the Puerto Rico sound. That’s what keeps me. So yeah, the and riding my bike. But the, you know, as a CEO or a founder, you drive the You know, my always saying was is, you drive the bus so something happens underneath there. 

Brandon: 

You got to take responsibility. 

Brandon: 

You got to figure out what to do next, but I don’t want to get off on track on that. I think that is good insight. And I think anybody who who isn’t willing to take responsibility or things that happened, probably you’re gonna not have quite a good outcome. 

Brandon: 

But you’re you’re now fiance who you just got engaged to, I believe last weekend. 

Brandon: 

Uh, Christmas. 

Brandon: 

Uh oh. Christmas day. Uh huh. Or maybe you wrote about it. Maybe. No. Maybe you actually wrote about it later, and I read it the other day, but, uh, that’s taking full responsibility for not knowing the date, but she moves in next to you. 

Brandon: 

And do you start a podcast? 

Brandon: 

No, I’m in real estate. 

Brandon: 

Oh, you do. 

Brandon: 

You’re selling real estate. Yeah, I’m Huck in real estate. And, like residential real estate, real estate. This is in 9 4010. The markets down 40%. People are foreclosing. I actually became an expert in short selling houses to help people avoid foreclosure, which was interesting. And then that was not even really working that well. So I did something that it’s called BPO s broker Price opinions where I would drive 45 minutes to a house, take pictures of it, do measurements and then come back, find all the comparables for for sale and then already sold and then come up with a broker price opinions of value and then get paid $50 for it. 

Brandon: 

Yeah, that was my life. 

Brandon: 

That doesn’t sound like a huge are Oi, but, well, I was terrible. 

Brandon: 

I think my gas almost, uh, I almost covered my gas bill in that. 

Brandon: 

So you got tired of that. 

Brandon: 

Got tired of it just wasn’t something. I still has a long term thing, and it was a great experience because I really, like, went after. I mean, I attacked the real estate market in San Diego for a couple of years and and had some winds and some in a lot of losses, and I could just see that it wasn’t something I wanted to do long term. 

Brandon: 

So then what? 

Brandon: 

Then believe it or not, a family Friends just happen to be with his family visiting Delmar, which is a couple towns north of Pacific Beach. And my dad reached out and said, Hey, you should go see Greg and I was like, Oh, go say hi and went to their place and we went and sat on the beach. 

Brandon: 

And I’m like, What are you doing? Greg, These days, you still in commercial real estate back in Maine? He’s like you. He’s probably about 15 years older than me. 

Brandon: 

Um and he’s like, Yeah, I’ve been doing it, you know, I’m a partner in the business now. 

Brandon: 

Things were going really well and commercial real estate. We’re actually going to bring on a couple a couple younger, younger generation people to kind of like bring some new life into it. And he’s like, I have to much work. I need to give work this work to somebody. 

Brandon: 

I was like, you know, and I remember this conversation so clearly, I said, You know, I’m thinking about coming back to me, which I really waas I was just like, you know, I’ve been San Diego this point for a couple years. 

Brandon: 

It was great. I made great friends, loved San Diego for what it waas what was actually single the time. 

Brandon: 

To be honest, I wasn’t dating Kate at this time. 

Brandon: 

And I was like, I think I’m gonna move back to Maine and he’s like, Ha, he’s like, Well, if you dio, he’s like, I know you’re really into real estate here, so you obviously get the real estate game. 

Brandon: 

I’ll bring you onto our our brokerage and you can take a stab at commercial Real estate was like, That sounds great, you know? 

Brandon: 

And I pretty much on the spot, agreed to move back to Maine within a couple months, which I ended up doing to start my commercial real estate career in Portland, Maine. 

Brandon: 

I bought a condo downtown. 

Brandon: 

It was beautiful. It was like a three minute walk toe work and and I kind of left the crazy unr Ili, my unsuccessful real estate career in San Diego behind and moved across country to Maine. 

Brandon: 

I don’t know how toe I don’t want to insult any listeners remain a guy who grew up in Maryland who moved to California and knock on wood, never moving back. 

Brandon: 

Sounds like an interesting transition for you. 

Brandon: 

So how long does that last That last? 

Brandon: 

A couple of years. 

Brandon: 

You know, my sister just there was There was reasons beyond, just like moving to a place to move to a place and the number one. 

Brandon: 

I kind of feel like it’s time for me to try to get my sink my teeth into a career. 

Brandon: 

And this kind of sounded like it could be a career like they were gonna put me on partnership track. It sounded more seriously professional than just kind of being a real estate sales agents. 

Brandon: 

My grand parents were very, you know, getting quite old at that time. 

Brandon: 

And I knew there wasn’t a lot of time left, and there was like, an opportunity to spend time with them. 

Brandon: 

My sister had just had a baby literally, and this was her first child. So there was just kind of like some family pull back because, like, I hadn’t been back in Maine since I left 18 years old for essentially 13 years, except for a very brief visit. 

Brandon: 

So, like one or two at most one week business per year. 

Brandon: 

So there’s kind of some family poll, and there was, like, some This might be a career opportunity poll, but there is no illusions of grandeur. 

Brandon: 

Like I knew Mane was not gonna, you know, hold any kind of, ah, candle to San Diego and all the location. 

Brandon: 

Reasons that, Madam. 

Brandon: 

So how do you find your way? 

Brandon: 

I’m gonna jump forward from times because I want to talk about your book. I want to talk a little bit about Puerto Rico and a few other things. The So how do you get to people call podcasting? I actually I’m a media guy and I have media company and sold it, So I find it a little like you have a media company. 

Brandon: 

You have a really a true media company. How do you get to that spot? 

Brandon: 

So I am not very fulfilled as a commercial Real estate agents. It’s just not my thing. I mean, I remember the day I knew this, and people listening you should be to resonate with this like I locked in a quote unquote big deal. 

Brandon: 

And then I was just like, Oh, now I’ve got to go build, create this contract and like, get signatures. 

Brandon: 

And I was even excited. I’m like, this is like a big win in the commercial real estate world, and I’m not even excited about. In fact, I’m kind of disappointed that it happened and I was like, This cannot be the career for me. 

Brandon: 

So that’s when I really just went double time into reading business books, entrepreneurship, books, learning and like that. I stumbled into it, listening to podcast just to try toe, learn and educate myself. And it was really kind of at that moment where I said, Man, I’m really enjoying these interviews with these successful entrepreneurs. 

Brandon: 

I feel like I’m learning a lot, and I’m kind of feeling like it. 

Brandon: 

Zits attainable toe like tea, maybe do something I can find something to become an entrepreneur. I have no idea what that looks like. And I’m like, You know what? I’m gonna dio. 

Brandon: 

I’m gonna go find the daily podcast that comes out every single day with an interview with successful entrepreneur. So I could just listen to a ton of these interviews and maybe one of those interviews and one of those ideas will spark something inside of me and Brandon. 

Brandon: 

That show does not exist in 2000 and 12. And I said, How does this show not exist? 

Brandon: 

How is there not a daily podcast like like these podcasters? 

Brandon: 

I’m sure they’re working hard, hypothetically, but one interview per week. I mean, come on. I’m like, e need mawr content. I need more quantity. 

Brandon: 

And that’s what I just said, you know? Screw it. I’m going to suck. 

Brandon: 

I don’t know what I’m doing. I’m not a techie person. I’ve never, like been an audio file, but I see a void that needs to be felt. 

Brandon: 

I’m gonna launch the first daily podcast interviewing entrepreneurs. 

Brandon: 

And I’m really proud to say that the day that I launched I was the best daily podcast interviewing entrepreneurs. I’m also equally proud to say the day that I launched, I was the worst daily podcast interviewing entrepreneurs. 

Brandon: 

I was the only show in town, brother. And that is the only reason why I won, Period. End of story. 

Brandon: 

Well, that’s a good story. 

Brandon: 

So you start publishing that. Are you doing this full time or you have a side gig and I think it’s important because there’s these people have these, You know, this when people start companies, they believe that you just one day quit your company started doing X y Z, and all of a sudden you’re living in Puerto Rico and living the dream life like quit my job. 

Brandon: 

I walked in and I, you know, gave some bs Excuse about why I was gonna be a commercial. 

Brandon: 

I don’t wanna be in commercial real estate anymore because I was letting some people down, To be honest, I mean, I was I had actually convinced my brother in law who’s the same age as me toe leave his commercial real estate firm that he was working with a partner with me with this new group which, by the way, end up being a great fit for him because now he’s a partner at the same firm and doing incredibly well. 

Brandon: 

But I also feel like I was I let you know that guy Greg down. That was my family friends that brought me on. 

Brandon: 

And but I knew I had to get out because I was gonna help them. Staying in is a and and forever be a very, very mediocre to below mediocre agents or broker. I just knew it was gonna help anybody. So I just ripped off the Band Aid, made it happen one day, walked away and went all in. 

Brandon: 

So to answer your question full time, I knew if I was gonna do a daily podcast, I’d hire a mentor, which I did. 

Brandon: 

I had to join a podcast mastermind, which I did because I don’t know anything and go all in. 

Brandon: 

And I did that. 

Brandon: 

And that was my sole focus. Starting in 2012 about the May time frame of 2012 and you stand up a podcast, you figure out the tech, which was getting better 2012, and then you just start reaching out to people and recording the interviews and publishing them basically. 

Brandon: 

I mean, I was just hustling. 

Brandon: 

I got, you know, for every 100 asks, I maybe got five or 10 yeses, so I’m pumping out the request because the Daily Show you know, man, I need 30 per month. 

Brandon: 

I need 3 65 per year, so I’m really going double time on this. And, you know, my my podcast mentor said, can’t be done you won’t find enough guests, you’ll get burned out. You’ll find enough time. 

Brandon: 

My podcast masterminds leader Cliff Ramos craft to a lot of people, knows the podcast. Answer Man said. Can’t be done. 

Brandon: 

A people don’t want it be you’ll never find enough guests and to me, you know, again having been in office in the US Army, where one of the best one of the reasons a little kind of side note as why the U. 

Brandon: 

S. Army is the best military force in the world is because they don’t train their officers to take orders. 

Brandon: 

They train their officers to get the information and then to make the best decision, being the feet on the ground and being the eyes on the objects and most other militaries, like the Iraqi army who never had a chance. 

Brandon: 

You know, another large militaries around the world. 

Brandon: 

They have no flexibility. They have no. And so when it comes to the bullets, start flying. They don’t know how to operate. They freeze. They panicked because you know there’s no zero plans survive first contact with enemy. 

Brandon: 

And so because that’s the truth, which it is. 

Brandon: 

All these plans that these other. 

Brandon: 

You know our opponents or enemies have. 

Brandon: 

They don’t survive first contact with us and they don’t know what to do. 

Brandon: 

Where the U. S soldiers, we improvise, we make things happen and don’t run into going too far detail. But that was my attitude When I got that information from my podcast mentor and my mastermind leader, Cliff France Craft, most entrepreneurs would have just been like Okay, the pros. 

Brandon: 

I’m just gonna listen to them. And I was like, sweet. 

Brandon: 

If the best people in the podcasting space say it can’t be done and I can find a way to do it that’s where all the opportunity is because the higher the barrier, the lower the competition and I had no competition, I was the only show in town because nobody else either could or wanted Thio produce a daily show interviewing entrepreneurs. 

Brandon: 

So I was it. 

Brandon: 

And yeah, and that’s hard. 

Brandon: 

I mean, anybody who produces has been in the content world. 

Brandon: 

I mean, doing content. 

Brandon: 

I don’t even care if you’re just sending out an email, much less recording a podcast and doing the reach out. 

Brandon: 

It’s hard, it’s, and I assume you were editing them in yourself 100%. 

Brandon: 

And I was terrible at editing. It was taking me forever. I did everything. I mean, I just worked my ass off. 

Brandon: 

And how long does it take for you to get some, like the flywheel spinning toe? 

Brandon: 

You know, you figure out how to monetize it, everybody. I mean, everybody’s always said, right, we’re gonna You’re just gonna do advertising, but in my experience, that is true. 

Brandon: 

But it’s not like, Oh, you have a podcast or you have a website or you have a newsletter and build it and they will come like you gotta sell some shit. 

Brandon: 

You are correct. 

Brandon: 

Seven months in. And that’s post launching my podcast, by the way. So that’s not even when, you know, like, actually started. This is like 12 months post going all in a K seven months post launch, because it was like a three or four or five month pre launch period. I did an email from this guy. 

Brandon: 

He said, Hey, I run this company called the Mineral, and we work exclusively with comedian podcast comedy podcasts and get sponsors for them. 

Brandon: 

We’re looking to move into the business space and frankly like. 

Brandon: 

I don’t think your show is the best show because it wasn’t and he was being honest. 

Brandon: 

He’s like, But you have so much inventory, you have a daily show. So that’s really appealing to somebody like me. Let’s jump on a call and let’s get you Some sponsors he’s like is frankly, sponsors don’t see great r O. 

Brandon: 

I from comedy shows because the listeners are all over the place. But he’s like a business show is like I have like 99 designs. Squarespace like LegalZoom like these companies want to be heard by budding entrepreneurs and businesses and all that jazz. 

Brandon: 

So after the call, he actually booked out my entire eight months. So starting at month, the end of month seven I zero sponsors and zero money it was made up to that point. 

Brandon: 

But in the eighth month I had a full sponsorship run that was generated $12,000 and I was off to the races and, you know, it was actually me taking that and then adding a few other revenue streams which we can or cannot talk about. 

Brandon: 

If you want Thio down the road, that allowed me to add month 13 Again of Post Launch. 

Brandon: 

More like month 18 of doing this almost. You know, a year and a half after going all in on podcasting. I did have my first six figure bus and yeah, little spoiler alerts. 

Brandon: 

One thing that we’ve done now every month since then is published an income report. 

Brandon: 

And I wanna ask you about that. 

Brandon: 

But I want to go back. Just ask one question before we jump there. I’m glad you went. There is Were you living off of savings? 

Brandon: 

100%. So when I graduated college, I was one of the fortunate few because of my army scholarship to have zero college debt. 

Brandon: 

Plus that $30,000 and my dad handed to me that he was otherwise would have been gone to my first semester of providence. By the way, I forget about the first year and then as a deployed officer, you don’t make great money, is an officer you make okay money. But I was deployed for 13 months where I literally during that time you save all of your money because you don’t spend any money on anything like I was a single guy. Didn’t have a family back home, spending my money so all that money was being saved. 

Brandon: 

You don’t pay taxes when you’re deployed and you hazardous duty pay and you’re still getting your housing allowance, even though I didn’t have a house or any kind of rent, so I, like, racked up like 85 K in one year. 

Brandon: 

That just was straight saving. So I was like around the low 100 toe, like 1 20 was like my bank account around there when I quit my job, because because what was funny when I got out of the military, I was able to not, like, decrease my savings from like 26 to 32. 

Brandon: 

But I didn’t increase that either. 

Brandon: 

I was just, like, hovering for six years because I just wasn’t really successful at anything that I did for those six years. 

Brandon: 

So to answer your question were directly is yes, I was just off savings. 

Brandon: 

So you publish this income report and there’s I find it. I think it’s interesting. I think it’s awesome that you open up the book because there’s, as you know, and you’ve been around the Internet enough. Now there’s a lot of mystery entrepreneurs out there who seem tohave G fives and Lamborghinis. But the best I can tell I’m being nice here. 

Brandon: 

They’re leased or rented for the picture shoot. 

Brandon: 

The only reason is by the way, they’re just going up to a car lot, right? So let’s let’s just call what it is. And I think it’s really terrible because I think it said expectations for entrepreneurs or people who are aspiring. 

Brandon: 

And I think you get the wind taken out of their sails when they when they realize that. And I’m not saying that some of these people that you and I both know aren’t good marketers. 

Brandon: 

I think good marketers is awesome, but maybe I’m too pure or something. 

Brandon: 

But as an entrepreneur, I think you’ve got to really shoot it straight for some people, especially when they’re quitting their job and whatnot. But I think it’s awesome that you publish it. I think there’s two sides to that, mainly because now we all we right, everybody knows what you make. So how have you if you could just I want to get to your book before we get to the bottom of the hour? 

Brandon: 

But how do you. How have you thought about that? Because there’s been some people. I won’t name them because I don’t wanna call anybody out. But some people have stopped doing the income reports because they say that it causes them not to be relatable. 

Brandon: 

I don’t know. I don’t publish my income report. I’ve considered publishing an income report on one of my companies, so I love to hear your thoughts as e I see your wheel spinning over there. What do you think? Maybe it makes them feel like not relatable. Or maybe they just stop making that much money. Well, thank you for saying that since your podcast is more popular and probably can withstand the scrutiny, I’m gonna appreciate you, John, for saying that. 

Brandon: 

Yeah, that’s true. And whenever people do ask me, like the question like, What’s the worst advice you think is out there? I say the worst advice is fake us. You make it. And that’s what so many people are doing out there. They’re faking until they make it. So they have all these illusions of grandeur and these cars in these in these, you know, planes and trains these automobiles and these yachts and and none of it’s real. It’s just all smoking mirrors. And it’s the worst because you know you need to build, know like and trust your audience in every way, shape and form, and you could lose in a second. Warren Buffett’s great quote of you know it takes you 20 years to build a reputation. Five minutes toe. Lose it and that’s the truth. So for me, back in 20 now, let’s just kind of like the 2013 timeframe when I’m actually making money again about a year and a half into my business of not making basically any money. 

Brandon: 

But at the essentially year and a half point, I started making really good money with the business, and I looked back and I said, Man, one of my inspirations toe actually even give this a try was pat flim when I was reading his income reports in 2011. I’m there with you. I actually I was like, actually made me feel bad because I had a podcast and 1999 and I was like This guy, I’m thinking to myself, man, I mean what I do, But anyway, I’m with you. 

Brandon: 

I remember pat doing that. 

Brandon: 

Let’s talk about comparing and despairing. 

Brandon: 

We could get into that later. 

Brandon: 

Don’t do that. 

Brandon: 

Don’t compare. Of course, I you know, I was like, Oh, here’s path like he’s a great guy From what I could tell, you know, obviously just reading seem like a family guy just adding value. And I’m like he’s making money and showing us how he’s making money. It was inspiring to me because I didn’t know coming from like a military like, you know, like trust is everything like respect is everything I’m like. 

Brandon: 

I don’t wanna be looked at it like some sly in the Internet, you know, sleazeball that’s trying to make money that I felt like was kind of out there a lot, but that kind of showed me there is a way. So my my attitude from that moment forward was, if I ever find a way to generate significant revenue, I want to show other people how to do it, and I want to do it the right and I wanna like kind of give other people of the inspiration that Pat’s given May and kind of pay it forward that way. 

Brandon: 

But I want to do it the right way, and not that Pat was doing it the wrong way because he did it the right way. But, like, I was like, I’m gonna bring my lawyer on to give illegal tap. I’m gonna bring my soup a on to give a tax step, but also because these air like professionals like there career is on the line like they are validating the fact that you know, my c p a does my taxes. 

Brandon: 

He knows my numbers like he’s they’re telling people that basically that like, hey, I’m gonna give you a diable taxes. 

Brandon: 

But I’m also here because you know that by me being here that I’m telling you that these aerial numbers John is legit because you can say anything you want. 

Brandon: 

And I wanted there to be mawr to what we did for Arlington reports. 

Brandon: 

So that was my inspiration for it. 

Brandon: 

And, you know, immediately upon doing it, I was getting the kind of responses that I’m sure paddles getting from a lot of people back in the day that were like saying what I was hoping they were saying, like John, like I study your income reports and It’s giving me so many great ideas on how I could make my first dollar or how I could do this, or, by the way, how I can avoid losing money, because we talk about how we make mistakes and fail all the time as well, or the Softwares and tools that we run our business on. 

Brandon: 

All those expenses are listed on the income reports so that people can see how do we run a multimillion dollar net profit ah, year business with three virtual assistants that have a salary of less than $4000 like That’s how we do it. 

Brandon: 

Yeah, well, that’s awesome in it. 

Brandon: 

It does give people inspiration, and I think it does show a real path. 

Brandon: 

And obviously it’s worked. 

Brandon: 

And that’s why people likely that’s why I had you on the podcast candidly and I’ve never met you. 

Brandon: 

I think we have some common friends, but, you know, you just I think you tell it how it is and it’s straight and it’s fair and it’s realistic. 

Brandon: 

If anything, it should be inspiring to anyone out there and and And I I used to be a venture capitalist. 

Brandon: 

You know that the model is be a billionaire and you’ll do that. 

Brandon: 

But I think it’s something to be said for a small business that can do $123 million and throw off a million two or a million three or whatever that number is and have a good life. 

Brandon: 

Yeah, and there’s something Thio Thio be said for that. 

Brandon: 

And I was lucky. 

Brandon: 

I actually sold my media company to a really big media company and it can work. 

Brandon: 

That’s how I’m sitting here in Half Moon Bay. Thank the Good Lord to do that. So I appreciate your comment. Commenting on that I want to talk about you got this new book. I ordered it the other day. 

Brandon: 

It is the common path to uncommon success, of which I think we’ve covered a lot here. I could probably go on and talk three hours just talking about your journey and and how it works because it is uncommon. 

Brandon: 

I think you’re inspiring those two. A lot of in a lot of military people. I work in that space and you don’t and taking out the myth that you’re going to get out and and that it’s gonna be magical because that expectation, I think, causes depression and some of it for riel, it really does. 

Brandon: 

It’s an issue, in fact, for a long time, and people would go back and search. 

Brandon: 

I actually had a podcast with two other veterans called High Speed Low Drag, where we talked a lot about that, so that we launched, I think, over 100 episodes talking about those issues we wanted just to kind of get that information out to the world. 

Brandon: 

But first off, I appreciate the pre order it. 

Brandon: 

It is not something that I take for granted. 

Brandon: 

So thank you for that. 

Brandon: 

Um, and the book itself, it’s It’s really the culmination of the 3000 plus interviews that I have now done over the past 8.5 years of, you know, my own personal journey of running a business that it’s not making tens of millions of dollars a year. 

Brandon: 

But it is net profit over $100,000 now for 89 months in a row. 

Brandon: 

So I have proven the longevity of being a successful business owner, slash founder slash runner, and it’s really what I what I want to tell people which is that you’ve been lied. 

Brandon: 

Thio those air The first words in the prologue I read that you, uh, you give the first just for listeners. 

Brandon: 

John. I think you give the first chapter first three pain. Yeah, it’s right there, the whole whole first chapter. It’s right there on the on the on the site that will give it a second here, and you haven’t lied to, like so many people out there want you to think that the path to success is hidden, that its secret, that it’s unattainable unless you give them $1997.97 to unlock their course. 

Brandon: 

And it’s a lot like the path is not easy. 

Brandon: 

It’s not an easy path, but it is attainable. 

Brandon: 

And it is a common path that these 3000 plus people that I’ve interviewed over 8.5 years have all taken. 

Brandon: 

It’s a very common path to their version, and that’s the key word there version of uncommon success. 

Brandon: 

And so I wanted to craft the 17 step roadmap that I’ve seen over the years that people take to get to this uncommon success, and it’s chronological. 

Brandon: 

In the book is simple. 

Brandon: 

At 17 chapters, 17 steps, every chapter is one step in that 17 step roadmap. 

Brandon: 

And I wanna be honest with your listeners. Brandon is like, I believe this again. 

Brandon: 

Don’t think that I mean, don’t think that I’m tryingto like, you know, offend anybody that’s watching listening to this right now. 

Brandon: 

But if you read this book and you apply the principles and you follow this road map and in six months you haven’t started to achieve some levels of uncommon success time to pack up and go home. 

Brandon: 

And by that I mean, entrepreneurship is not for you. 

Brandon: 

This this world is not for you. And that’s not a bad thing. You should find that out sooner than later. And this book is going to get you there sooner than later. Because if you’re meant to be on this road in six months, you will be stoked with where you are on your past uncommon success. 

Brandon: 

And if you’re still struggling in six months, it’s not gonna happen for you. So go find amazing job. Go be the 37th employee at Facebook like somebody was at one point who’s by the way, worth more than you or I will ever be worth, because he’s actually a friend of mine and he’s like, not even 35. 

Brandon: 

And it’s true because not everybody is meant to be this person in a room building this brand new thing by this like And this is this is the book to get you there quick to know this is for you. 

Brandon: 

Now you’re on the right path or this isn’t for you. 

Brandon: 

Go find Go find your path because this is not it. 

Brandon: 

And so I’m passionate about the book. I’ve gone all in on it like people like yourself that pre ordered you’re getting five amazing bonuses. 

Brandon: 

One of them. I’m shipping all three of my journals literally to your doors. $150 worth of journals shift to your doorstep for free. My Freedom Journal, My master journal. My podcast journal, all three of them. There’s four other amazing bonuses. Like you said, there’s um the first chapter is also available on the website of People Want to peruse that First they could read the prologue and and Chapter one, but this book has been personally endorsed by people that don’t just endorse books to endorse books like Seth Godin. 

Brandon: 

He read this book. 

Brandon: 

You personally endorse this book? Gary Vaynerchuk. Same thing. Neil Patel, Erica Mandy, Dorie Clark Like these individuals don’t put their name on something they don’t believe in. And I’m very proud of that specifically. 

Brandon: 

So that’s Ah, that’s the book. It’s It’s available Schooling live on March 23rd. If you wanna see the video and read more about the book and see the bonuses are uncommon success book dot com Uncommon success book dot com We’ll put that in the show notes, and you also get I didn’t listen. 

Brandon: 

I only listen to part of it. 

Brandon: 

I think you and Kate do an audio interview that already downloaded behind the scenes with some very yeah, we called the Lost Content episode. 

Brandon: 

And if anybody’s like ever, like, wondered about, like the book process, like writing a book through the traditional publisher, like having an agent, the publisher, the pitch that this, too, that the advance, which I’m very open, and I I like to be transparent like I’m a first time author. 

Brandon: 

I got $350,000 to write this book as an advance doesn’t happen. 

Brandon: 

It happens because I built in audience up over eight years with my podcast and and and they were able to look at that and say, Okay, this is valuable. 

Brandon: 

We know he’s going to move books, period. 

Brandon: 

And so I tell the whole story the whole background. 

Brandon: 

It’s very, very interesting. 

Brandon: 

And all of these bonuses, by the way, disappear the day the book goes live. It’s only available for pre orders. 

Brandon: 

Yeah, and I’m gonna actually listen to that on my bike ride. Yeah, and I think the book processes is hard. So I congratulate you. And hey, you got a A nup front advanced like holy cow. 

Brandon: 

That’s that’s a really book. I’m not insulting any other. 

Brandon: 

My mom wrote seven books, and it’s super hard. It is not for the faint of heart. 

Brandon: 

71,000 words. This thing is 273 pages like it’s a meaty E debug. 

Brandon: 

Just Chapter 11, by the way, is longer than most business. But did you did you write this yourself everywhere? I’m gonna be honest. I’m transparent. 

Brandon: 

I interviewed a few a few ghost writers. I was like Sure is I want to know what that’s like and what that would look like. And and I’m not against the process. Some of my good friends have done just that, and they, you know, obviously raved about it. 

Brandon: 

But you know, the day I’m like, these people aren’t me. 

Brandon: 

They don’t know me. They’re not going to write in my voice and my audience knows me. 

Brandon: 

I’m like I’m doing this thing. So for two out the first two hours of every day for 2000 and 20 up until about August, it took me until mid August, essentially from earlier in January. 

Brandon: 

All I did was the book that was walked off my counter every single day for two hours Saturdays and Sundays as well. 

Brandon: 

And after I got whittled down and edited and in its final form. 

Brandon: 

Now, at 71,000 words, I wrote every single word, even the passengers where I had my contributors, like I had them give me an audio clip. 

Brandon: 

And then I took there the audio clip and I I wrote the words which, of course, I had them approve because it’s it’s, you know, representing them. 

Brandon: 

But I wrote those words like every word you read. 

Brandon: 

I wrote Well, that’s awesome. 

Brandon: 

And you, I guess just from I’m curious and maybe listeners for anybody who wants to do a book. Do you had an editor go through and help you that you picked? 

Brandon: 

Yeah, it’s actually it was a science by HarperCollins because when I signed with HarperCollins, they kind of bring the whole package. So I have my editor, my publisher. 

Brandon: 

I have my marketing launch manager all with at HarperCollins that are all part of the HarperCollins network. 

Brandon: 

And it’s been quite a process. 

Brandon: 

Well, I think it’s gonna be awesome. 

Brandon: 

Anybody listening, you should get this book. And I think that we should be grateful, John, because not a lot of people say what you say. 

Brandon: 

I tend to get some lash back from it. Uh, there’s this belief that everybody should buy on on. Everyone can be an entrepreneur. And frankly, I find that insulting from a guy who’s been an entrepreneur since he was I don’t like I discount the Lemon State Lemon Aid stand thing. 

Brandon: 

I think that was interesting. And but I think with my brother and I just wanted I don’t know what we want to do by Atari cartridges. but the the it’s sort of an insult. 

Brandon: 

It’s sort of like saying, you know, anybody can be a NA Army officer or not everybody can do it in this job super hard. It has ups and downs and not for the faint of heart. So one last thing, three h p t s for high percentage tips for any entrepreneurs out there who are just starting, you’ve done 3000 podcast. 

Brandon: 

You wrote a whole book on this? I assume you’re going to continue to do your podcasts. 

Brandon: 

No, uh, desire to stop at any point. 

Brandon: 

It’s kind of one thing that I share in the book is like once you found your zone a fire like you hang on to it. And this is what I love doing. And the day that I stop loving him like we’ll see what’s up. 

Brandon: 

But until then, I’m driving forward. So what are three h p. T s for fellow aspiring or current entrepreneurs out there growing the business number one. 

Brandon: 

You have to be productive with your dad. 

Brandon: 

And by productive, I don’t mean what 99% of you dio which is run around in circles like a chicken with your head cut off, you know, spend all day like death scrolling chick talk and instagram, You know, talking to people that aren’t moving your business or improving your lifestyle. 

Brandon: 

I’m talking about producing the right content myself and Brandon. 

Brandon: 

Right now, we’re producing the right content for our businesses, period. Me being a guest on his show, He having me as a guest on his show. We are right now, both productive because we’re producing the right content. 

Brandon: 

So people need to sit down and evaluate their day and say, What did I actually do today that was producing the right content for my business? 

Brandon: 

And that’s gonna be different for everybody. 

Brandon: 

And most of your lists are going to suck number two. 

Brandon: 

You need to be a disciplines. And when I see disciplines, you need to wake up in the morning with an actual plan in place and then execute upon that plan. 

Brandon: 

Like when I used to coach people one on one, I would always my first question be like, Okay, pull up. 

Brandon: 

What you’re playing for the day was today, and they’ll be like, Well, what do you mean? 

Brandon: 

I was just gonna like answer emails all day and go post something on social unlike. 

Brandon: 

And that’s why you’re paying me money to tell you what to do. 

Brandon: 

Because you can’t figure out what to do on your own. You need to be a disciple to a plan of action, discipline yourself to have a plan of action and be a disciple executing upon that plant every day. I could show you my calendar right now in your your jaws would drop because none of you could probably do as much work as I’m doing today. 

Brandon: 

But number two like you would be really, really impressed with how every minute is accounted for. 

Brandon: 

And then number three, you have to focus. 

Brandon: 

You have to follow one course until success. 

Brandon: 

So many people they want to go on just taste a million things. And I get that on some levels toe like see what works for you. But then once you settle on one thing everything else is gonna is gonna is gonna be cut out of your life. You’re gonna have this one laser focus toe win. The reason why entrepreneurs on fire one at such a high level. 

Brandon: 

Because I did nothing else except produce a daily podcast for 2000 days in a row. That was the Onley focus. Anything that got in the way of that was out of my life. 

Brandon: 

It wasn’t even a chance. And for two, that’s 5.5 years. Can anybody watching or listening to even picture doing something for 5.5 years? Probably not. 

Brandon: 

Which is why you haven’t made millions of dollars like myself, a brand it. But when you dio welcome to the big leagues, John, that was awesome. 

Brandon: 

Wishing you the very best of success with your book. 

Brandon: 

We will put that in the show notes, and hopefully we’ll talk to you again. 

Brandon: 

Love a brother. I enjoyed it and thank you friends for tuning into the show. 

Brandon: 

If you enjoyed this episode, please rate review. We want to hear from you and subscribe so you don’t miss any of our weekly episodes until the next time. Remember, you are just one business plan away. I’m rooting for your success. We’ll see you soon. 

Brandon: 

Wow

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