fbpx
How to Breathe Correctly with The Oxygen Advantage Patrick McKeown Featured: Body Podcast

How to Breathe Correctly with The Oxygen Advantage Patrick McKeown: Business Podcast

How to Breathe Correctly with The Oxygen Advantage Patrick McKeown: Body Podcast

BODY How to Breathe Correctly with The Oxygen Advantage Patrick McKeown
BODY How to Breathe Correctly with The Oxygen Advantage Patrick McKeown

Summary

It’s highly likely you’re not breathing correctly and it’s effecting your ability to concentrate, energy levels, weight, sleep and overall well being.

Author Patick McKeown explains why we’re not breathing correctly and how to do it right with easy exercises you can start while you listen to this podcast.

A full transcript of the episode is below

much as I’m not like, 

Patrick: 

didn’t that,What I do is I released the podcast, and then we’re, uh, have a whole YouTube channel. 

Patrick: 

So the YouTube channel also get the video. 

Patrick: 

Most of these I do not. 

Patrick: 

Unless you say something that you come back and say, Hey, we gotta get that out. 

Patrick: 

It’s pretty much free flow because my style is more of a conversation than trying to make it perfect. It is preserved, professionally produced and edited. 

Patrick: 

So any arms or Oz or anything like that will get taken out. But other than that, it’s,it’s straight talk for people that sort of my style. 

Patrick: 

Great. 

Patrick: 

And and so I have No,I mean, I have a general outline, and I’ve obviously read your book. 

Patrick: 

More than probably. 

Patrick: 

Most people got notes all over, but, uh, I was going to start out with just you taking us through how you even got here. 

Patrick: 

I know you have the story with I don’t even know how to pronounce that guy’s last name. That starts with a view to take. 

Patrick: 

Oh, have you take out? 

Brandon: 

Yep. and then sort of how you started this thing and then really get into the nuts and bolts. I don’t know how much you can guide the conversation. Aziz, much as you want or not. Like, some people don’t want to give us much of, you know, they want people to buy the book. 

Patrick: 

 it’s so really me. Ever give us much information? It comes back to you anyway, so, yeah. 

Brandon: 

I mean, your real gig is I assume, which it sounds like you’re booked up. Uhm is take your course at some level. 

Patrick: 

Yeah, it’s supposed to. Courses are one thing the travelers booked out, and then we do that the live online. 

Brandon: 

So I’ve just changed it over to a hard cable there. So you might have had an interruption. Oh, yeah, My change from WiFi toe hard cable. So the speech should be better, but yeah, it’s it’s different modalities. Technology is a great way of opening it out there. 

Brandon: 

Okay. All right. I’m always sensitive to that, cause some some people know I say give as much information as you can. Most people aren’t going to retain it, and they’re gonna want to hire you anyway. 

Patrick: 

And that’s pretty much the way It usually rules for me. do you have any questions? No, We have a time. Do you have a time constraint? 

Patrick: 

No. 

Patrick: 

Uh, you pronounce your last name? McCone. Right. Me killed McEwen? 

Patrick: 

Yes, Amon. Americans. Terrible. Uh, And where? What? What? Where you coming from this morning? 

Patrick: 

I’m based in Galway, Ireland. 

Brandon: 

In iron. 

Patrick: 

So it’s in the West Coast. 

Brandon: 

Yep. That’s so I need you’ll you’ll talk about that. I think we’re good to go. 

Patrick: 

Is there anything else? 

Patrick: 

 no. If you see me so you can look in the video, but don’t feel like you have to look in the video the whole time. You know what I mean? It’s that people are most of the people in your you were listening on the voice. Anyway, if you’re me doing anything, it’s I’m adjusting stuff pressing or anything like that. 

Patrick: 

 if I disappear, I’m in the room. But I’m doing something somewhere here, either. Uh, sure. I work at home. Probably like you. So if a dog starts barking, not gonna happen here too. 

Patrick: 

Yes, exactly. 

Brandon: 

So that’s what we’ll do. All right? Are we good to go and you can don’t like and if you need to use the restroom. 

Patrick: 

If we start going too long to give me a time out and we’ll go, that could happen to me. 

Patrick: 

No. 

Patrick: 

Sure. No problem. 

Brandon: 

You can drink. You get anything you want, so all right, we’ll get rolling. 

Patrick: 

21 everybody. 

Patrick: 

And welcome to another episode of Build a business with Brandon. We have Patrick McGoohan from Ireland with us today. I’m so excited because I read his book The Oxygen advantage. 

Patrick: 

I want to say, a year ago or so I can’t quite remember. But what I do remember is is I couldn’t put it down. And I think a lot of people don’t understand that breathing can fundamentally change your health. And it changed mine. I’ll tell a story later on. I don’t want to take Patrick’s thunder away of how I even realized that breathing was such a mechanical thing. That can make such a big difference. And I learned that in my bike racing by Patrick, Thank you so much. I know you are coming to us over the holidays and that you’ve been traveling and you come to us from islands. Thank you. 

Patrick: 

Sure. Of course. My pleasure. Thanks, Brendan. 

Brandon: 

 like I said, Patrick, this book Really? You know, I hate to say change my life, but fundamentally, there’s certain things in life that you learn that you didn’t know and I’ve done that around food, some things around food and then the same thing with mobility. 

Patrick: 

I learned from another practitioner or I say, part scientists about how that and that really changed my life. But there’s breathing. I think people don’t quite understand. I told you the other day when we were talking on the phone, that I see all these athletes with their mouth open and after reading your book, I’m like, Jeez, they could be there there at such a high performance level they could be so much better. But maybe in the beginning here, Patrick, you could tell the story. I think it’s really interesting how you even got here and wrote a book and are now training people around the world of how you started on this. 

Patrick: 

Sure, I came across a completely by accident by my background was I did economics on did social sciences in the university in Ireland called Trinity College Dublin, but I had asked me from a very young child. 

Brandon: 

So it was asthma. 

Brandon: 

Andi blocked nose because a few of inflammation of the lungs that travels up to the nose on if you have inflammation of your nose that travels down to your lungs. 

Brandon: 

So it’s not that the lungs air isolated to unified airway on If you’re knows this stuff for your sleep is affected, and people with a stuffy nose there with nasal congestion there 1.8 times more likely to have sleep problems. 

Brandon: 

So I was a kid with asthma, wheezing, continuously, stuffy, nose continuously and sleep continuously. 

Brandon: 

Sleep deprived ons. 

Brandon: 

You put that kid in the university, you put him into high school on the amount of work that’s required to try and pass grades, and it wasn’t like in primary school. 

Brandon: 

I was very bright and secondary school roll fell apart and then in the university for me to get. 

Brandon: 

The grades are spending 10 to 12 hours today, so I was through the medical model for about 20 years, constant medications, and then I heard about the work of a Russian doctor, and he simply said two things. 

Brandon: 

He said, Breathe through your nose and you see breed lightly. 

Brandon: 

And it’s time I was hard breeder. 

Brandon: 

Like if I walked into room, you’d hear me breathing. 

Brandon: 

I was one of those guys sitting at a dinner table. 

Brandon: 

I was constantly caught for brats and, you know, fast notice about breathing open my operating. Just a bit of a mouth crater, as it’s fairly common out there. But of course, nobody says anything to these kids are rattles. And so I switched to know his breathing asthma dramatically improved and sleep on concentration dramatically improved. 

Brandon: 

Well, now, did you just Totally. You went and studied under him, and at that point, you gave up economics, and that was you started down a whole new career path. 

Patrick: 

Yeah, totally. What? I finished my degree. So my degree was finished on, I was the in the corporate world, which I hated on. 

Brandon: 

The reason being I hated was the stress levels of us. But it was probably that it may not have been the company that I was working for, but it may have bean that my ability to hunt the stress was pretty pretty reduced. And because I was in a fight or flight response all of the time, I was highly strong on Stop would have been related to my breathing. And we know from the literature the Children who were open mouth breathing that their sleep is impacted. That is a huge risk of 80 HD huge risk. There’s a 40% increase need for special education, where Children who have sleep disorder, breathing and if it’s untreated by the age of five years of age. Five years of age. 

Brandon: 

So I was one of those kids to slip through the cracks, but I’m not alone. It’s a least 25 to 50% of studied kids are in the same position is may. 

Brandon: 

So the actual breathing through the mouth and I can’t I I’m trying to think back to my childhood. 

Patrick: 

I don’t know if I was from health breather or not, I I imagine maybe I was, and I didn’t realize that might tell you who tells me that Patrick all the time is my dentist. He is all he saw me and he said, You’re a mouth breather. I said, No, I’m actually not a mouth breather because when I switched to him, I had read your book and the writing, my biking trying to keep my A mouth shut all the time, and it was probably in my sleep. 

Patrick: 

So we’re gonna talk about that. Someone asked you about that, but basically, could you take us through? 

Patrick: 

I know in your book you talk about it, but Indians and native people and going back in time always kept their baby’s mouth shut. And I found that really interesting. 

Patrick: 

Yes, I think it was just it. Like we were born with Our Max closed a newborn baby and the self published at the back of them out on the epic largeness is meeting so they’re physically incapable of breathing through the nose on if if young infant is anatomically compromised, if they have, say, a small airway or if they’ll have a high, narrow polish, it can certainly increase the risk of SIDS sudden infant death syndrome. 

Brandon: 

And it’s because thes kids can’t switch to march breathing because physically, for the first few months of life, they’re not ableto so. 

Brandon: 

Even if thieves thieves, kids get a stuffy nose, get a runny nose if they have a compromised airway and if they have a head cold, their risk of sudden infant death syndrome has increased. 

Brandon: 

Like Brandon, it’s absolutely phenomenal. 

Brandon: 

The relationship between craniofacial development, my breathing on Children reaching their full potential. 

Brandon: 

Our ancestors knew about it. 

Brandon: 

If you look at Neanderthals, there was a study that committed by two years ago on the researchers concluded that the undertones of these big, wide, mass nostrils This wasn’t just to handle air on conditioner while during rest. 

Brandon: 

This was also to be able to condition there during physical exercise on Caucasians. 

Brandon: 

We’ve got very small nostrils, but the shape of the human face has changed, and it has changed fundamentally, probably in the last 102 100 years. 

Brandon: 

And this is all because I don’t know if I was reading on your website or in your book or somewhere you are talking about that the actual facial structure I started Look at my own face because you also in that article, it talks about teeth and t vastly being crooked as it relates to breathing. 

Patrick: 

Yes, absolutely. 

Patrick: 

There are some orthodontist in the United States who were leading the world in this and Dr William Hang from California and James Bronson Andi. 

Brandon: 

There’s a Siris of different orthodontists in the medical field Kevin Boyd is pediatric dentists from from Chicago. 

Brandon: 

Healer Robbins from California’s. A huge amount of them. They understand this, but money or two down, too stoned. But it’s pretty much a simplest. It’s all my breathing. Children develop crooked state, but they don’t just develop crooked state. 

Brandon: 

Their jobs were also set back. 

Brandon: 

I have a mouth breathing face. 

Brandon: 

My nose is bent because my Max L. A. Which is my top jaw, is to set too far back. It should be about 20 mil forward on my face. 

Brandon: 

But I didn’t have my MacOS as a kid, so my tone wasn’t in the roof of the mouth, driving the face forward so literally your tongue is the scaffolding for the development of the lower 50% of the face on. 

Brandon: 

If you’re having your mouth open, you can’t have your tongue resting on the roof. The map, because you need to take air in and out of your mouth so ideally, are much should be closed. 

Brandon: 

We’re breathing in the night through her nose, and her tongue is resting on the roof. Them out and good looking faces are functional faces, so it’s no, it’s on the other thing I would say is that people often say when I’ll get to teach straightened, straight teach don’t make a good looking face, but a good looking face creation straight teach. 

Brandon: 

Well, I have heard a little bit of good news and a little bit of bad news for us, Friend, that is who busted would breathe through our mouths because it sounds like it happens when you are young and it it effectively is not reversible, right? 

Brandon: 

I’m, you know, pretty much not know that on forward head posture as well. 

Brandon: 

So the whole Paul Marie, you know, the whole respiratory system is welcome be knocked off, and more so, if a child has a sleep disorder breathing by the age of Asian is untreated, they have an 80% chance of having a permanent 20% reduction in their mental capacity for the rest of their life. 

Patrick: 

So this is not just about the craniofacial development. 

Brandon: 

This is not just about responded streak. 

Brandon: 

This is about the full genetic potential of the child. 

Brandon: 

And I know this isn’t just related to Children. Brandman. I as a narrowed I used to have to really slug it out. 

Brandon: 

My concentration was so affected and what his concentration. 

Brandon: 

But our ability to hold our attention on the subject matter for a period of time without distraction on my concentration was very, very poor. 

Brandon: 

And as a result, I couldn’t function properly in my job. 

Brandon: 

And if you can’t function properly, things go wrong and you can’t manage people and you get stressed more and your sleep was affected and you’re tired. 

Brandon: 

So when people talk about breathing, they use you say Big Brett, this nonsense that you’re here on, how many people are teaching breathing exercises? Number one is they have no idea of the basic physiology of breathing known they never talk about the importance of nose breathing. All that you hear them saying is take, I like you now to fill the bottom part of your lungs into the middle part, Take a big breath. Taking all that oxygen into your body is the greatest load of nonsense ever put out there. And I’m putting it out there and I might sound a bit critical here, but I am because there has bean a wave off this information put out there, which is absolutely not helping this matter, and That’s why I would say if anybody is teaching breathing, at least learn the basic medical physiology of fish before you start talking about it. 

Brandon: 

So, yeah, I wanna There’s a whole but we cover a whole. But I might take a step back in a minute, going back to kids and basically what parents can do to help do that and then move into adulthood. But I do want to say something, cause after reading your book, you know, I sometimes I can’t keep my mouth shut. And I do say things because you hear, even even even the I mean people who you would think would be very sophisticated in teaching yoga and all the sorts of stuff. 

Patrick: 

And they’re saying, Take a deep breathe breath in and take it. And basically, if I’m right, Patrick, they’re effectively activating the fighter flight symptoms. 

Patrick: 

So they’re trying to get people to relax, but inherently they can’t relax because the physiology of taking a breath through your mouth is is that it’s in the upper part of your chest. And by the way, I’m not all this smart. The reason I got smart because because I read your book so I wanna, uh, say that I have no this, but it’s all in your book, is is that upper part of your chest And then when I’m thinking news is that it just becomes a circular reference. 

Patrick: 

So the very nature of trying to get relaxed isn’t relaxing them. 

Patrick: 

And can you talk about that a little bit like, Yeah, it can be quite common for people to feel hunger for air and the individuals who feel a hunger for air during their everyday breathing. 

Patrick: 

They tend to have a breathing pattern disorder, and when we look a breathing, we need to look of breathing in terms of three dimensions. When is the biochemistry in the blood, which is basically carbon dioxide in the blood? When is the biomechanics as to where are they? Breathing into? 

Brandon: 

Number three would be the cadence of breathing and most yoga instructors not all but most of them, and they concentrate on the biomechanics. 

Brandon: 

But they overlook the biochemistry and the overlooked, the cadence of breathing. 

Brandon: 

Whereas somebody who may be interested in heart rate variability, they were concentrate on the cadence of breathing, but they overlooked the biomechanics and they look over up the biochemistry. 

Brandon: 

And when we’re talking about breathing, it’s not just about the breathing off the person while they’re inside the studio with the therapist or with the organ structure. 

Brandon: 

I’m concerned about the breathing of the person when they walk down the street when you’re sleeping at night, when you’re watching television when they’re playing sports, How how is that person breathing? 

Brandon: 

Because it’s our everyday breathing, which ultimately drives our performance. 

Brandon: 

So doing a few breathing exercises inside the yoga studio, that’s all well and good. 

Brandon: 

But how is the person breathing outside the studio? That’s decay, right? 

Brandon: 

So let’s step back a little bit because I think we’ve left a bunch of parents who have younger kids. 

Patrick: 

Potentially, Asher was, What can they do, starting early before five to get nose breathing happening? 

Patrick: 

Well, first of all, anatomically, I would have the parents just look at the child’s, open them out the child’s mouth, look into the roof of thumb out and see. 

Patrick: 

Does the child have a very high polish? 

Brandon: 

Is it very, very high? 

Brandon: 

C. R. The child sat back. How is the craniofacial development of the jaws? 

Brandon: 

Andi Naser breathing is absolutely essential, but also, genetically, some kids can have compromised airways. 

Brandon: 

Now the whole debate in the dental fielder’s Is it a small amount, which is causing mouth breathing because there’s not enough room for the tongue? 

Brandon: 

Or is it mouth breathing, which in turn, has led to crazy off craniofacial abnormalities, which in turn has led to a small mouth? 

Brandon: 

We need them out to be able to house the toll because the tongue has only got two places to bay. It’s either in the roof them out or it’s falling into the throat. 

Brandon: 

And if our tongues falling into the throat, we have sleep up there. If it’s partial, it’s a high Poppaea. If its total flaps of the airways it’s asleep at near now, they did. Throat can collapse and four different places, but certainly the tongue. 

Brandon: 

And also the narrowness of the upper airway is a cave featuring this. So what can parents to, I would say, Pay attention to your child on absolutely encouraged Children to breathe through their noses at all times. Even young babies gently pressed her lips together. Any time you see the lips apart, they’re small little exercises that we do our Children’s program is absolutely free. 

Brandon: 

It’s up on beauty co clinic dot com, and you see all of the exercises for Children there. 

Brandon: 

I don’t know how you find about maybe you might go to learn it or something like that, and you see a Children’s course and we will have a new Children’s course. We just filmed it in December because our current Children’s courses about it’s 10 years old on. 

Brandon: 

We just finished filming on the 17th of December, so hopefully we have that engineers, and we have a live that would be for any child anywhere in the world completely free of charge. And that’ll be on on your website on oxygen advantage dot com. 

Brandon: 

I don’t know if we’ll have an open oxygen advantage dot com. 

Patrick: 

We’ll have it certainly Open Butte, teco clinic dot com. Okay, so we have to websites oneness for health, which is beautiful clinic and then oxygen advantage dot com is more driven towards sports performance. But you know what? You’re not gonna be a good at fish unless you have a good airway. And you’re also not going to be a girl, at least unless you have good sleep. So I would say to parents, Release pay, pay attention to kids and getting them Teoh. Keep their lips together now. Also keep a Niners at night. Are part of the training that you could use is have them where a little piece of paper tape under coming down their lips during the day on fender supervised when they’re watching television. 

Brandon: 

So say, for instance, if the child is watching television for an hour and 1/2 or an hour, half an hour or whatever, just have some were a little piece of biker poor tape just coming down, you know, vertically down to keep the lips sealed. 

Brandon: 

Now we will have a tape coming out called my oh tape on my oh, tape is designed to come right around the lips, and it’s kidney zio base, So basically, you put it’s like a big go on. 

Brandon: 

Just stretch the tape and it goes around the lips, and that brings the lips together. 

Brandon: 

But the child is able to talk and open the remote. 

Brandon: 

 so we’ll have that out because we also need Children to wear tape across their lips at night with doctor approval on its Not that we’re covering the lips. We need to get the merits close. Like Brandon. I’ve been using tape in my lips for 20 years, and the reason that I do that is because I wake up feeling alert now any of your listers as adults, any of them who are waking up in a dry mouth in the morning. 

Brandon: 

And as you’ve kind of pointed a little bit early run, the dentist will understand that they were to have more increased incidence of dental kit decay, inflammation of the gums, Bad Brett, but also poor sleep. 

Brandon: 

So my breathing no should. 

Brandon: 

Nobody should hope so. Nobody should wake up with a dry mouth in the morning because if you wake up in a dry moat in the morning, you’re unlikely to feel refreshed. 

Brandon: 

So a few things here thank you for doing the Children’s training. I think that’s really important and very nice of you to build that, because it is important and thank you for building the tape, which I hope you’re building for adults, cause I’ve used us basically sports tape, which really stores the best for their skin care. But, and I’ve also adjusted. I actually have one of those Mr Pillows or whatever they’re called here in the United States. And I adjust it so that it pushes underneath my chin. 

Patrick: 

And then I basically, for the most part, don’t move. Although my wife occasionally tells me that I snore, which I’m not really sure is true or not, but, the that the tape would really be useful. 

Patrick: 

And one thing I want you to touch on, if you can, because I think like the increased intent, the increased in detention that you can get from breathing is a huge motivation to start to think about it. 

Patrick: 

But there is one thing that you talk about in your book and I know would be important to people to get their attention. Is is that if you actually breathe through your nose, you can lose weight without even trying to lose weight. 

Patrick: 

Is that is that an accurate statement? Now, if you eat doughnuts and crispy cream and all this stuff, I mean not to go to fight that, but in general it does change how your body, I guess, several assist. You capitalize his food. 

Patrick: 

It’s not over. It’s not always 100% reproducible, but I’m gonna just point out a few aspects of it. We’ve seen that happen time and time again on DWI. Especially seen it happen that when people were putting golden going through the breathing program, they would go through a detoxification and they would have a total loss of appetite and they would have an increased need for thirst on way. Don’t like. We don’t know what’s happening with in that instance, but we know that by changing breathing patterns on by slowing down the bread to create air hunger, air hunger signifies the carbon dioxide is increasing in the blood with an increase of carbon dioxide in the blood. 

Brandon: 

Blood vessel, stylish on increased option is delivered to the cells so we can improve oxygen uptake on delivery by changing breathing patterns. 

Brandon: 

And one system which is going to get more oxygen is the gastrointestinal tract. 

Brandon: 

That may be one of the reasons. Another aspect is that because of sleep, once we get people breathing through the nose, the risk of sleep. 

Brandon: 

Octavia, I popped the operator. We resistant syndrome on snoring reduces if an individual is having sleep up there and they’re stopping breathing during their state, this affects torque disinfects hormones to hormones. 

Brandon: 

In particular, one is lepton and uterus. 

Brandon: 

Ghrelin. Latin is a food suppressant on Grell. is an appetite promoter, so I would sleep up there. 

Brandon: 

There is a greater production, it seems, of Granlund, and with increased gray Alan, the person is waking up the next day with a bigger appetite. 

Brandon: 

They eat more food, and as a result, they put more weight on the belly on obesity and sleep up near Go together. 

Brandon: 

When there’s more ways on the Bali to die from breathing, muscle doesn’t work as effectively as it should do and to die from breathing. 

Brandon: 

Muscle is linked with the operator with dilator muscles in the throat. 

Brandon: 

So we need nose breathing for diaphragmatic breathing for the operator with dilator muscles in the TRO to work more effectively. 

Brandon: 

No, it’s breathing. 

Brandon: 

Also, the harness nasal nitric oxide, a nitric oxide, is a signalling molecule to be a prayer, but dilator muscles, and also there’s a role there for carbon dioxide. 

Brandon: 

If the motor is open and you know the tone is likely to fall back into the throat, the mandible is falling into the trolls. 

Brandon: 

The upper airway is drying out, becomes inflamed, becomes more narrow. 

Brandon: 

There’s a risk of sleep apnea certainly increasing, so there is definitely some link there. 

Brandon: 

But I can’t always say that we can produce it on. 

Brandon: 

I think the other aspect is emotional eating. If people are stressed, some people will completely stop eating and they lose weight. But orders will leave a lot more. So we know from mindfulness of people doing mindfulness, which is basically observe observation of the breath. 

Brandon: 

You know, that appetite can reduce and that weight loss can happen as a result of it. So why does that happen? We don’t always know. Does it always happen? No. Does it often happen? 

Brandon: 

Yes. Yeah, well, I appreciate you straighten that out. I was excited. 

Patrick: 

I One thing that I’ve been monitoring all sorts of stuff because I’m a statistic numbers guy and I use a ah, forget what it’s called. There’s ah, it’s a sensor that actually goes underneath your mattress to monitor my sleep and that can I forget? 

Patrick: 

What sleep tracker, I think, is what it is and and the reason that I love it, Patrick is is that it’s automatic, so you don’t press a button on your phone, You get in. Is it perfect? Not always. I hit it when I get up in the morning. but the one thing that it does measures it measures heart rate and it measures breath rate. Now how accurate that is. 

Patrick: 

I don’t know, but I do know that if you use it consistently over time that it’s relative. And the one thing that I have noticed and maybe you could tell me what you think is that I try to always eat by seven o’clock. 

Patrick: 

Actually, I like to eat by 6 30 Anything after 6 30 AM pretty much starting toe. Feel uncomfortable because I shoot for seven hours and 20 minutes of sleep a night. If I get a afraid, if I get 8.5, if I get seven, I’m OK. But the thing that I’ve noticed is is that if I eat and I’ve also noticed with this right foods, if I eat within two hours of of going to bed, my breath rate is significantly higher as well as my heart rate is my heart rate recently because it’s the holidays and I have cheated a little bit and it was my birthday. 

Patrick: 

So I did eat things in high Sugar. 

Patrick: 

I noticed. Really, really significant. Change is my heart rate is as much as 10 beats a minute. I actually started to think there was something wrong with me because and it is still within range, but we’re looking at 70 as opposed to 58 or 56. Sure. Do you think that that obviously has an effect, which then has this whole sick coots cycle that that effects weight gain and bad sleep and then turns into eating more? And I think that’s what you’re really saying, right? 

Patrick: 

Yeah, I think it could be part of it. 

Patrick: 

And intermittent fasting is getting a lot of attention at the moment. It’s not an area that I’ve necessarily looked into, but I’ve looked at a few papers on the treatment of cancer using intermittent fasting on this would be an area for people to investigate it more. 

Brandon: 

And it’s really looking, promising what they’ve done with mice on exposing mice to two diets onto restricted eating, on the effect it was having on Schumer’s. 

Brandon: 

And unless I said, I can’t give you an absolute definitive answer on it. 

Brandon: 

But we should always wake up feeling hungry. We should always wake up with an appetite, and it’s always a good rule of term. To have the word breakfast obviously, is break fast. So it’s a fasting period that we are having before we resume aging on. I don’t know how true it is, but apparently it wasn’t always a necessity for the human being to eat food first thing in the morning that this was something that was generated by a major cereal company that’s they were able to change perceptions by making the breakfast being the most important or one of the most important perceived meals of the day. But apparently our ancestors, they didn’t it wasn’t, You know, it’s only going back a couple of 100 years, so that could be an interesting story for people to look at. So are we. Using according to times are our creation according to how we fail on we are reaching, according to times of the day were evening according to getting up in the morning. We’re eating according to our lunch break, 1 to 2 o’clock generally and we’re reaching, according to me, a time when we get home from work, and that’s usually 6 to 7 on in Europe. 

Brandon: 

Bacon be Asian nine oclock. So I think there’s definitely something you’ve said there. Although it’s not, I don’t know, a whole lot of bad nutrition. I think it is an interesting one on the connection with food and breathing is definitely interlinked. 

Brandon: 

We know that the first incidences of mouth breathing that were documented going back where one must 400 years ago. 

Brandon: 

But more recently in 1938 in a book called Nutrition and Physical Degeneration that Children who were switched from a traditional diet over to a process dies. 

Brandon: 

We’re becoming map readers, or at least it was documented that they become my partners. 

Brandon: 

So breathing through the nose effectively is it fair to say, can help ah, process your food in a better way because it’s releasing the the you know more than ideo. 

Patrick: 

It’s releasing the we’re using the being able to use oxygen in the right way to absorb, to metabolize the food in food. 

Patrick: 

You know, it’s again, I can’t I can’t give you that. I don’t know the correct answer to Dash. We know that what I do know about nose breathing is the nose is serving so many different functions in the human body. 

Brandon: 

I’m going to go through a few of them, and some of these functions will assist. 

Brandon: 

Wish up, not appetite. 

Brandon: 

But the processing of food number one is nasal breathing. 

Brandon: 

More tend to result in slower breathing because the nose imposes a resistance to the breathing. 

Brandon: 

That’s 2 to 3 times that of the marriage, whereas if you breathe through them out, there’s no resistance to breathing during wakefulness. 

Brandon: 

So matter breathing allows more air to commence the body, but knows breathing is very important for slow breathing. 

Brandon: 

And slow breathing is very important for activation of the bodies. Parasympathetic response, rest and digest. 

Brandon: 

Where is my breathing is the individual is more likely to be that in that fight or flight response. And I don’t think if we’re in a fight or flight response that it’s conducive to metabolizing food. You know, we’ve always said that the whole relax ation response and in assistance with our eating is important on with our sleep, like if you think of it, human beings. 

Brandon: 

Now we’re in such a go go go frenzy, and I think it’s crazy the Western world has literally gone mad. 

Brandon: 

That’s and it’s getting worse. Brandon, if you see that if you see the rates of suicide with young girls, it really has increased from the from the years 7 4000 and 8 2000 and nine right up to the present day. Less so on boys. But instagram not like Okay, I’m giving out brands here. Maybe you connected the matter if you want. 

Brandon: 

Now, it’s only fine. 

Patrick: 

But any of these social media and we’re talking about instagram We’re talking about Facebook. We’re talking about two YouTubers. 

Brandon: 

We’re told me about the pressures that airport on young kids, that they’re seeing this absolutely perfect version of what they should be looking towards. 

Brandon: 

And it’s unattainable, you know, it’s just it’s such a distorted reality that’s being put out there, and then these young kids are striving to achieve distorted reality they’re coming from. The kids are coming from different economic backgrounds, different abilities, you know, everybody is different, but yet or so much pressure put on kids to look beautiful. To be told, the intelligent and to be Welty on toe have the Lamborghini outside. It’s nonsense and coming back to this Have we increased stress on individuals, which in turn is going to impact breathing? 

Brandon: 

And I would always say that there’s three pitchers to what we do. 

Brandon: 

Breathing is one pillar. 

Brandon: 

Sleep is the other, and the mind is theater. And I’m gonna cut. Put breathing at the top because if your breathing is mount on fast and shallow, it affects the mind. 

Brandon: 

And if your mind is agitations, it affects your breathing. 

Brandon: 

And if your mind is agitated, it affects your sleep because you cannot sleep if you’re reminders agitation. 

Brandon: 

But if your sleep is not good, then the mind is agitated. 

Brandon: 

And if your breathing is not good, your sleep is not good. So each one of these are feeding into one another. And you know, when we talk about the autonomic nervous system, this is the automatic functioning of the body that we don’t have to think about. We can influence this through the breadth, and when we talk about good breathing habits, its nose it’s slow and it’s died from magic. So when Esper said, there’s three dimensions to breathing, nose breathing is very important for biochemistry and slow breathing on diaphragmatic breathing because ultimately, when you’re breathing through your nose, you can breathe later on. 

Brandon: 

Also practice slowing down your breathing to the point of a slight air. 

Brandon: 

Hunger. A slighter hunger signifies that carbon dioxide is increasing in the blood, and the increase of carbon dioxide will cause what’s caused a right shift of the oxygen global dissociation curve. 

Brandon: 

But basically oxygen is released from the red blood cells in the presence of carbon dioxide. Now we spoke about the idea of people telling us to take these big, deep threats. 

Brandon: 

Well, if we take a big, deep breath now, I’m talking more so about a big breath than a deep right. 

Brandon: 

The Big Brett gets rid of too much carbon dioxide from the blood through the lungs. 

Brandon: 

The loss of carbon dioxide in the blood causes the bond between the red blood cells, which carry oxygen on oxygen to be strengthened. So it’s ironic. The harder we breed on, the more air we breathe into the body, the less oxygen that gets delivered to the cells. And that’s why we need to turn upside down the current way of thinking with breathing. 

Brandon: 

So that was a lot the I wanna say a few things. One is I think that the kid issue on social media for sure is a huge issue. I’d also suggest that it’s a huge issue for adults. One of the things, As you know, I teach entrepreneurs and we have all these. 

Patrick: 

I I don’t know what to call him out there, But marketers who are teaching people that you can turn an online business, build it online business and do this overnight and all this stuff. And I actually did building online business. It wasn’t overnight. Can you get lucky here and there you can. But in general, I’ve never met someone who is super successful with real wealth who didn’t take a while to build it. And we have all this marketing and just creates all this pressure, which probably creates heavy mouth breathing, which then increases stress, which then they can’t. I mean, it just goes on right Then you can, you know, if you don’t have attention. one thing I want toe ask you. I wanna just tell my story real quick, Teoh listeners, because I told you this and and I’m really passionate about people understanding that breathing makes a difference and not just to blow this off. 

Patrick: 

I mean, the When I used to ride bikes, I was telling Patrick the other day on the phone that bike racers will look at other racers and look at their mouth. And when their mouth is hanging, their jaws hanging down to their to the handlebars, basically, you know they’re in in high stress situation, and you will basically at that point, attack them and then you will drop them and they will come off the back of effectively what you’re riding in. Is there a larger, smaller Saletan and I When I learned that when I first started racing and everybody started saying what I said, Well, how did you know that you are going to attack me? 

Patrick: 

They’re like all your mouth was open. 

Patrick: 

So I just started writing with my mouth closed all the time. I had no idea, and and what happened was I realized, for whatever reason, that I could stay on the front, and basically it’s called pulling on the front, and I could pull for minutes on end, and I could never figure out why. 

Patrick: 

But I was like, Well, I’ll just keep doing it and effectively. I used that in all my racing and in your book. And maybe you can talk about it too, because we have a lot of bikers in Northern come from. There’s a lot of bikers everywhere in the world, but effectively doing breathing exercises correctly can increase E p O. 

Patrick: 

Which effectively is what people try to dope for this, right? 

Patrick: 

I mean, so it can give you this advantage in sports and probably everyday life that your body is producing a drug that people pay for. 

Patrick: 

Yeah. Yeah, it’s legal, and it’s totally legal. 

Brandon: 

Can you? And you can do that by doing breath exercises. Is that right? 

Patrick: 

Yes. Correct. Now I’m gonna come back to, your cycling. 

Brandon: 

So you you made a brave decision there. And this is something that most cyclists wont to. And the reason being is when this rich from arts, nose breathing, they feel suffocated. 

Brandon: 

Yeah, I felt like I e felt like I was dying, to be honest with you, but most people will give up at that point on this rich tomorrow breathing, and they won’t give it a second thought. 

Brandon: 

However, if they keep breathing through the nose during physical exercise. 

Patrick: 

The air hunger goes away. 

Brandon: 

I’m not saying it goes away completely. Of course, there’s going to be air hunger, but it diminishes on it gets easier. 

Brandon: 

How long? 

Brandon: 

If I take, you know, take about 8 to 10 weeks on. 

Patrick: 

It’s only been studied once. Would you believe that’s how under study this is? There is a triathlete from the United States. His name is George Dalam d a l l am. And he switched to nasal breathing about four years ago, and he’s also an academic on. 

Brandon: 

He put it to the test. He’s got two papers. You’ll find them on on that matter. You’ll find him if even just Googled George Dalam nasal breathing one of his papers. He spent two years trying to recruit recreation, laughed AIDS, and he wanted to get recreational athletes to breathe through their nose for a period of six months and to see what performance indicators that changed. 

Brandon: 

He. 

Brandon: 

After two years of recruitment, he managed to get 10 athletes in total. That was it. So it goes to show the popularity of nasal breathing in sports. In any event, he had them trained for six months permanently with Naser breathing. And then he measured thumb when they exercise with their mouth open versus when they exercise with their My closed on. 

Brandon: 

This was under graded exercise test. 

Brandon: 

Andi Wittmann closed. They had 39 breaths per minute with Mount Open. 

Brandon: 

They had 49 breaths per minute. The carbon dioxide in the blood was 44 millimeters of mercury pressure with the mouth closed and it was 40 millimeters of mercury pressure with the moat open. Now already, that’s a huge difference, and ventilation was 22% less with the mouth closed, and they had 100% of their work. 

Brandon: 

Roesch intensity with my clothes vs might open, but with 22% less ventilation. 

Brandon: 

There’s an energy cost associated with breathing. 

Brandon: 

You spoke of the cyclist that you know when he is gassed out or she’s gassed out. 

Brandon: 

That’s the time to hit them. 

Brandon: 

Will your gassed out when your breathlessness is gone toe a point that you’re not able to sustain the intensity of exercise. Now your legs can be going jelly, but the legs going jelly doesn’t necessarily indicate a buildup of hydrogen in a cabbage or to respond to muscle fatigue, so there’s a few things that we need to look out. 

Brandon: 

Number one is. How do we late delay fatigue With improved breathing, you’re not wasting energy inefficiently. 

Brandon: 

More breathing is absolutely a waste of energy. 

Brandon: 

It’s fast, shallow breathing. It reduces oxygen uptake in the blood on the reduces oxygen delivery to the cells. 

Brandon: 

If you think of the shape of the human lungs, it’s a triangle that goes into an apex when we breathe. 

Brandon: 

When an open mouth we’re ventilating mainly the apex of the lungs were fast and shallow breathing. We’re losing more air to dead space. There’s more air getting staying in the nasal cavity in the throat. So to give you the matter there, say, for example, you have an individual who is sitting down and they’re breathing 12 breaths per minute. 

Brandon: 

On the size of each breath is 1/2 a leisure, and that gives us 12 by 500 mil. Gives us six leaders, so the amount of air that’s taken into the into the and say the nose is six leaders. 

Brandon: 

Now we want to find out how much of that air actually gets into the small air sacs in the lungs because that’s the purpose of breathing. We have to subtract dead space. Dead space is the air that remains in the nasal cavity in the throat. In this track, here in the bronc I in the bronchi, or is so if you take in six liters of air into your nose. 

Brandon: 

Of that, 4.2 litres reaches the small air sacs for gas exchange to take place. Now if I change the response rate from 12 breaths down to six Bretz on if I multiply the title volume from 500 mil. 2000. In other words, we still have six liters of air coming into the nose. The amount of air that’s getting into the smaller sex has gone up from 4.2 to 5.1 liters. That’s a 20% efficiency and breathing. Just by changing the response oration, can you imagine somebody who is my breathing? Not only are they wasting so much Erin dead space, but they’re also breathing shallow, and the greatest concentration of blood in the lungs is down in the base of the lungs. 

Brandon: 

So the p 02 and the blood is 10% lower, with nasal with sorry, 10% lower with mouth breathing versus nose breathing on. This was written about by any anti doctor of Jamespark from New Zealand who spoke about researcher Swift When patients and your surgery under Jaws were wired. Shashi host surgery the P 02 in the blood increased by 10%. Now we’re sightless needs to harness every available molecule of oxygen to get that oxygen, not only into the lungs, into the blood but from the blood to the tissues to the muscles to the working Muslims. That we spoke about Salome’s paper, the CEO to in the blood was 44 millimeters of mercury pressure. 

Brandon: 

That’s a significant increase from 40 because the body is very sensitive to carbon dioxide buildup. 

Brandon: 

So ah, Higher CO two partial pressure is going to increase. The greater is going to lead to a great rocks chin delivered to the cells, less lactic acid, less fatigue. Now coming back to us respond to muscle strength is also very important because if the dive from breathing mustard fatigues blood is stolen from the legs to feed the die from on the legs, give out. 

Brandon: 

So if you were to see a Mattlage under making pretty good headway. But the next thing is their legs start going from under them. 

Brandon: 

That may not be necessary due to a buildup of hydrogen nine the legs. But that can be blood stealing from the response your muscles that they’re getting tired. And this is where nose breathing comes in, because when you breathe through your nose, your breathing against resistance and your nose by adding an extra load onto your breathing has happened to maintain response. 

Brandon: 

You must a strange so Brandon when you switch to nose breathing, I would say that you were absolutely the minority because ice, I’m not a runner. 

Brandon: 

I’m not an actress. I’m just a breathing nerd. And I came across this because I’ve had not because of sports. But I was trying to put the dots together because physiology in health and physiology, when we want to maximize oxygen uptake and delivery means the same. 

Brandon: 

I stood in Copenhagen about three months ago under side of the road during American Andi. 

Brandon: 

I said They’re in a says. I want to take a couple of photos of people with their mouths open, and I just stood there literally everybody passed me with the mouth open on. I could not see one person with her mouth closed. Now, how on earth is that possible? Our ancestors? Didn’t your physical exercise with the matter open? Most animals, with the exception of dog, do all of their physical exercise with the mouth closed. So it just doesn’t make sense. The stupidity of mouth breathing during physical exercise, That should be the next title of a blood. 

Brandon: 

Well, maybe we’ll do that when we write about this podcast. E think I haven’t even spoken about a p o. 

Patrick: 

So that’s another two. 

Brandon: 

Well, I think one of the things is, you know, we have sent. We have so many people, different people out there. But just in general, for this average person who maybe go to the gym, maybe doesn’t work out. 

Patrick: 

But what I’m thinking is I’m listening to you is Yes, there’s a you know, as a cyclist, that was it’s That’s the whole strategy. Is is that in general, uh, you know, we’re not riding bikes for an hour. We’re riding bikes for 234 and five hours. You know, my Saturday right. Five hours. It’s down the coast and back, and every minute you’re got to figure out how you’re going to conserve enough energy to basically get back. 

Patrick: 

And for me it’s always in a headwind, and it’s absolutely horrible. 

Patrick: 

But Aziz, we translate that that some people won’t be able to relate Teoh, because they’ll, you know, some people say that’s absolutely insane. Most humans don’t do that. They’re you know that not in for that sort of torture is just translate that to everyday life and think of yourself during your waking hours. 

Patrick: 

However many waking hours, you get eight hours or seven hours some, most people aren’t even getting enough sleep was, We’re not gonna talk about today, but it is true. 

Patrick: 

And then their mouth breathing effectively. Their life endurance during the day is going down, and it’s not. 

Patrick: 

It’s not linear equation here. 

Patrick: 

It’s exponential. So think about it. I’m thinking about it is by 11 or 12 o’clock they’ve been mouth breathing. They probably inhaled some sort of our inhale taking in some sort of caffeine, of some sort, which is increased heart rate again, which is increased mouth breathing and by two o’clock, you know, everybody and in at least the United States are like, Oh, my God. 

Patrick: 

Two o’clock. I’ve got this. I’m just dead or one o’clock. Well, you ate too much. Probably at lunch. You’re trying to metabolize that you’ve been mouth breathing which effectively you are worn out because you’re breathing so heavily. You’re basically panicking. 

Patrick: 

You’ve got all this inbound stuff. 

Patrick: 

And if people would just take a step back and breathe through their nose and breathe easier and really think about breeding from their stomach, right? 

Patrick: 

Yes, that it’s not just mindfulness, you know, people want to talk about that is just being a human and operating your piece of machinery that we were given the way that it was designed. 

Patrick: 

Well, what’s breathing about? If you were to open up a medical textbook and if you were to look at the functions of the nose, the functions of the nose will describe the filtering, the moistening, the regulating volume and nitric oxide that’s inside the nasal cavity, etcetera. 

Brandon: 

If you were to look at the functions of the Mount, it will never mention breathing as a function of the Mount. 

Brandon: 

Breathing is not a function of them out now. 

Brandon: 

I know money doctors overlooked this, and they probably don’t even think about this. 

Brandon: 

About the mouth simply isn’t for breathing the energy expended by mouth breathing. 

Brandon: 

It’s so inefficient that’s a greater proportion of our oxygen. 

Brandon: 

Consumption will be going to support the breathing muscles with mouth breathing because of fast, shallow breathing. 

Brandon: 

We’re reducing oxygen uptake. 

Brandon: 

We’re reducing oxygen delivery. It’s trauma to the airways. Think of the amount of guys or girls they get. Exercise and Jewish Broncho constriction also think about this. If they were my breathing for five hours, they’ve lost a lot of moisture. Your nose is there to not only moisten the air on the way in, but also trap the moisture on the breath out. 

Brandon: 

The nose traps 42% more moisture in the human body than the motors are The mount. There’s a water last through the mountains, 42% higher. 

Brandon: 

No, that means that if you’re doing physical exercise, you don’t have to be taken consuming as much water. 

Brandon: 

Your hydrated better energy levels are better. Dental health is better, because if your marriage is dr for that period of five hours, that’s going to have an impact on the under gums and the teeth etcetera. So I think just just know there’s no comparison to it. Yeah, it’s tougher. And this is like, I’m not saying that you have to have absolutely 100% off all of your work time for five hours Naser breathing. But what I would say is absolutely have most of us as best you can, especially low intensity, especially during the warm up except trip. But if anybody is just going to a trade, melons, you know, draw treadmill for 1/2 an hour an hour, once or twice. And if it’s every day, or if it’s every second day or whatever maintained only allow yourself to exercise as an intensity that you can maintain. 

Brandon: 

Nose breathing now knows breathing, and the speed that you go will depend on a number of factors. Number one is your boat score, which I think we should talk about it because it gives people feedback. Number two is the size of your nostrils. Now, if you look at my nostrils, they’re all over the place. They’re very small under compromise. So, for instance, if we have an athlete were compromising Ostro’s, I get them to wear nasal dilator. 

Brandon: 

So if you’re for instance, if you put one finger here in one finger here and if you just gently prized your nostrils apart that’s called the Cottle maneuver, you should fear that you can handle a little bit more air coming in. 

Brandon: 

In other words, it’s easier to breathe through the nose that will allow you. If you were to wear a nasal dilator, it would allow you to sustain Naser breathing at a higher intensity of physical exercise. 

Brandon: 

Now the bold score is the body oxygen level test, and this is a measurement of functional breathing versus dysfunctional breathing. 

Brandon: 

I’m basically the scores as follows or the test ISAS follows. You take a normal breath in through the nose and normal breath. After the nose, you pinch your nose and your time mission seconds. How long does it take until you feel the first definite desire to braid? And then when you let go, your breathing should be pretty normal. Now, what does the Bulls score measure? 

Brandon: 

Well, in general, it measures the chemo sensitivity of the body to the build up of carbon dioxide. 

Brandon: 

However, there’s also feedback from the lungs to the brain, so if in individual has Broncho constriction. They’re both score is going to be reduced the results of a cognitive component involvement. 

Brandon: 

So if the individual is panic disorder, the air hunger is they feel it build up, they will re stern released their nose quicker. 

Brandon: 

But in general, the both score is a measurement of the on sesh on endurance of breathlessness, so you can measure how breathless is the actually sh by simply measuring their both score during rest. And the greater the Brit degree of breathlessness, the more likely they are to gas out too soon. 

Brandon: 

So if I look at a gnat lish and I see them in press conferences, I’ve sat around boardroom tables. I speak with athletes. I look at their breathing. 

Brandon: 

If you see fast upper chest breathing, that’s a problem. 

Brandon: 

Because already, if the athlete is breathing like that during rest, that breathing is going toe amplify during physical exercise, and that that it’s going to fatigue. 

Brandon: 

So, I would say, is every athlete or anybody who is involved in sports or those individuals would exercise and just broncho constriction measure both score. 

Brandon: 

It should be at least 25 seconds, and if it’s not at least 25 seconds. 

Brandon: 

There’s room for improvement. 

Brandon: 

Yeah, Thank you. I was going to bring that up on the bolts cork. So I like to give people some tools that they could start to use you. Everyone’s gonna want to buy your book, because in the book, it describes the different segments. Uh, you’ve said it should be 25. When I first started, I had already been reading through my nose with biking, and it was it was around 25. 

Patrick: 

The other thing. 

Patrick: 

And I know you have different scales and the block the gold is 40 but for functional breathing versus dysfunctional, it’s 25 seconds. 

Patrick: 

Yeah, and I guess the one question I’ll ask, cause I’m sure the listeners will be asking the same thing is when you say desire to breathe at the end there. 

Brandon: 

Is that the gulping funk, uh, feeling or is it really just I’ve gotta breathe. 

Patrick: 

It’s Yeah, it’s kind of the first. Like if you stop breathing so say, for instance, you have a normal breath and normal breath out. You hold your nose as you hold your breath. 

Brandon: 

At some point, the brain is going to send a signal or an impulse to bridge, and you may feel it as an involuntary contraction of your breathing muscles. 

Brandon: 

Or you might just feel Isha’s the stress or you may even just feel it’s is a contraction of the muscles in the throat. 

Brandon: 

That’s it’s at that point that that would be the definite desert bridge. So you’re breathing. Following the battles should be fairly normal. That’s the best indicator. 

Brandon: 

Rubbish. Got it and then some. I say as a result, when you start breathing through your nose and I mentioned this to you and you said, Yes, that’s normal And you talk about in your book is you will get a runny nose for a or a while when you started. And that’s a good thing, right? 

Patrick: 

Yeah, and we don’t We don’t know why it’s happening. It may be just irritant receptors inside the nose, you know, because there’s a large volume of air coming in and out of the nose did. Your thing is about the knows when you switched to Naser. Breathing your nose shouldn’t feel painful. It shouldn’t feel painful unless you’re really trying to pull airport share a proletarian pull it, man It’s too much done at that point, so it should still feel relatively comfortable breathing through the nose. 

Brandon: 

And, of course, it’s going to be a challenge at the start based on your fitness levels. 

Brandon: 

How much practice you’ve bean doing with nasal breathing? You’re both score on the size of your nose. You know, it’s the world bear all of those mind. But what I would say is it’s much better, much more efficient and to do all of your physical exercise with Mara. 

Brandon: 

Sorry, all of your physical exercise with nose breathing first smoke breathing. 

Brandon: 

I was talking to a friend the other day and she has, She said, My nose has been stuffy since I was a kid. 

Patrick: 

I can’t remember ever doing that. I said, Well, you’re gonna be so excited cause you gonna listen this podcast. I’m talking to Patrick. He’s got this book. You’ve got to read it and you’ve got to listen to this. I was so excited, she said, Well, I don’t know. You really think it will clear my nasal passage? And in your book, I think the magic number Well, I don’t know what the magic now I’m sure people very, but you try to get people to be able to take 80 steps at some point is, and I think for me when I I actually do laps in the morning around my living room if I get to about 35 because I’m not to eat yet after trying to but it Sometimes I lapsed, and when I get to about 30 steps 35 I actually do feel my nasal cabins. 

Patrick: 

I can’t explain it. 

Patrick: 

But in World Match no. Any aunties don’t know how it works, and Air knows TRO doctors. If I speak with them and if we get into a conversation about how it’s working, it’s unknown. But which your friend with nasal congestion, she should try the following Now don’t do it if she is pregnant or if she’s got cardiovascular issues on high blood pressure. So you know, when she’s in fairly good health, give it a go and she’s not pregnant now. The exercise is very simple. Take a normal breath in through your nose and normal breath. I three and I was pensioners. Hold your nose and start walking as your hold your breath and continue walking around. 

Brandon: 

Continue. Continue walking up and down your room, whatever you’re doing. But continue holding your breath and keep going until it gets pretty tough. You’re there to hold your breakfast long. She can. When you’re Neco, release your nose breathing through it and come your breathing immediately. Wait ammunition. Do it again and do it five or six times that will open up your nose. Now, when you’re both score reaches about 25 seconds, your nose will be more permanently free. 

Brandon: 

So your friend would have been in the same vicious circles as I was in. 

Brandon: 

If the nose gets stuffy, you’re not gonna break through it, whether it’s a child or narrowed. 

Brandon: 

If you’re not breathing through your nose, then you start mouth breathing. But I just start mouth breathing. Then your nose gets stuffy again. The only way to free up your noses. 

Brandon: 

Brett Hauling our physical exercise, which are my clothes but also to use the nose on to increase your bowl. Score. Now two points before I forget, you mentioned EPO, which is a retro appointment when you do five strong battles. 

Brandon: 

Your split, though, when you do five strong Bretos your kidney synthesize a hormone called retro puttin on this hormone, then will send a message to the bone marrow to mature red blood cells, and it takes about 3 to 4 days for this to happen. 

Brandon: 

But also, when you do five strong brittles, your spleen, which is your blood bank, which is located on the left side underneath to die from that contains about 8% of your red blood cells on five strong Brittles causes the spleen to release red blood cells into circulation. 

Brandon: 

You have got increased red blood cells for between 10 and 60 minutes. We’re not quite sure. The length of time to the taste for displaying to re absorb the blood back on the quality of blood in the spleen is really, really high. 

Brandon: 

80%. 

Brandon: 

Is he mad? A crash? So, you know, it’s really richly danced oxygen carrying red blood cells, even one breath told of 30 seconds were caused. Explain to contract. 

Brandon: 

But another aspect of it is you’re everybody’s. Open up when you hold your breath, but also you increased blood flow to the brain. So this would be for, say, around two players who were giving a presentation. 

Brandon: 

I give presentations on dykan, give presentations to sometimes groups of individuals. Five or 600 people in the room. How do I prepare farce? 

Brandon: 

I want to be in an absolute frame of mind that I’m fully in the present moment because I don’t like using power points. 

Brandon: 

I don’t believe that you should have a power point, because all it does is hypnotized the audience, their apps looking at a screen. 

Brandon: 

I want to look eye to eye contact with the audience, and I speak sometimes. 

Brandon: 

Okay, Sometimes I speak 34 days without power point just talking, talking, talking, talking. I use whiteboards and, well, how do I prepare for I do at least. 

Brandon: 

But first of all, I never arrived to the event early. 

Brandon: 

I would, if I’m speaking a two o’clock, I make a conscious decision decision to stay in the hotel room up to about one o’clock that day. 

Brandon: 

I don’t want to talk to anybody. I don’t want to turn up at the conference at nine o’clock knowing that I’m speaking a two on by the time two o’clock comes, all, all of my energy would be stopped out of me because I’ve been talking to everybody. Everybody’s asking you questions and you have decision fatigue. I want to conserve as much energy as I can possibly. So I hide from everybody. I arrive at the event at most would be an hour before hardens. But before that I’ll spend about 1/2 an hour slowing down my breathing, bringing all of my attention inwards, taking my mind out of taking my attention out of my mind onto my breathing, slowing it down on bringing myself into the present moment. But now I’m too relaxed on before. 

Brandon: 

So in order to take myself out of the state of relaxation, I do five strong battles, five strong Brittles, increased blood flow to the brain on they put you into a stress response. So any time if you feel like it’s a if somebody is making a presentation on, if their mind is a little bit anxious or if they’re feeling just a little bit fatigued, well, simply take a breath into, you know, is a breath out through your nose, pinched her nose, hold your nose, walk about holding your breath that increases blood flow to the brain, opens up the airways and put you into that stress response so you kind of want. 

Brandon: 

Always have a balance giving a presentation. You want to be relaxed. You want to be fully in the flow fully in the present moment, but at the same time you don’t want to be too relaxed. So the slow breathing is all about relaxation of the mind. 

Brandon: 

I would have individuals put their hands than lower two ribs and as they breathe in that the lower two rooms air moving average on us, then breathe out that the lower two rooms were moving in and to really slow down the speed of their breathing so that their breeding slow their breathing light on their breathing deep. 

Brandon: 

Because diaphragmatic breathing is also very important for the mind, chess breathing is agitation of the mind, so it is true to take a deep threat. 

Brandon: 

But it’s not true to take a big, deep Brett take a deep breath, choosing to die from, but also have slow breathing and light breathing. 

Brandon: 

So we have all three, and that’s really important for anybody with anxiety. 

Brandon: 

Anybody would even depression, post traumatic stress disorder, and we’re just there’s another aspect of it now that we could talk about. It’s not even in the bar. But it will be in the next one that’s coming out next year and on. 

Brandon: 

You know you don’t want to be too relaxed, and that’s where the bread towards air coming in to bring you out of the relax ation into a more fight or flight response. 

Brandon: 

So in this next book, you’re going to talk about how you leverage these tools to put yourself into the states effectively. You’re putting yourself in the state, so you’ve you have calmed your mind. 

Patrick: 

But then you’ve excited your physical, your physical aspect so that you have energy to go into this event. You whether that’s a presentation or whatever that may be even, uh, an athletic event. And, yeah, I’m surfing. 

Patrick: 

Yeah, I just we used to do it for athletes. 

Patrick: 

That was initially what it waas and, you know, we want to go in with a frame of mind that you’re fully in the present moment. 

Brandon: 

I want to be able to place 100% of my attention on doing what I’m doing. 

Brandon: 

I want to be in a state of flow. The time is just moving simultaneously that I’m not stuck in the past. I’m not stuck in the future and that I’m fully engaged with what I’m doing. 

Brandon: 

If, for example, on the years that I spent my breathing, I was so fatigued and I would live in my head, I would literally be thinking, thinking, analysing, thinking, worrying, anxious on my attention was all stuck in my head. 

Brandon: 

And how could I be having 100% of my attention during what I’m doing when I’m living in my head on the US An example in the book I was a 16 year old going to school as a kid that went to a Christian brother school on. I went wall by school, come up with a family Catholic family with six brothers. So yes, so we we weren’t the most outgoing when it came to that two females. So it was this lovely looking girl, you know, she was about 16 as well, and I remember saying thinking to myself, Grounded love hurts. Sit down beside me someday and guess what? On the bus she sat down beside me and I spent. 

Brandon: 

It was it was about 50 minutes to journey. Waas, on a spent the entire 45 50 minutes thinking, thinking, thinking, thinking one. And we’re going to say to her, and I built it up into this massive thing on Guess what? I never open my mouth for the entire duration because I had overthink this. I had built it up into such a momentous activity that ends up doing nothing about it. And I’m not saying Don’t think about something, but this is where the Brett would have come in because I would have been in the frame of mind knowing that all I was doing was striking up a simple conversation on. 

Brandon: 

Of course, that didn’t happen. 

Brandon: 

And this is for agitation of the mind consent. 

Brandon: 

And I had a very, very active mind. I was thinking constantly, constantly stuck in my head. Poor sleep that help a dash, and I give you another example I used in the book. 

Brandon: 

I was studying for an exam in the university called Trinity College in Dublin. 

Brandon: 

On I studied for three months for this exam because, of course I’d be looking at a page you know and say you have a page of material and I’m looking at us, and here I am, looking at the page of materials, but I’m looking at it, but my focus is not the material. 

Brandon: 

And to an outside observer would seem yet I was studying, but sure, my attention wasn’t done during what I was doing. 

Brandon: 

I was living my head. So by the time I read to the bottom of the page, I wouldn’t remember anything, so I’d have to start off again. So in any event, I study for three months for an exam on one guy called Terry Clone. He didn’t open a book for the exam. Never never opened the book he was. He was developing a business at the time. Called tax back dot com. This was back in 1990. It was It was European Student Services at the time, But this back in 1996 1995 he came in and he says, Do you have your notes? 

Brandon: 

Airness is I have on. I handed him my notes and I remember him focusing on my notes for 20 minutes and I mean focusing on them, and I remember at this point I was in my twenties a saying I couldn’t do that. 

Brandon: 

I knew it was different. 

Brandon: 

What he had done that I would just be going through the motions. But he was actively engaged. The two of us meant often did her exam. He got the same score as I gosh, so he had an innate capacity to concentrate. Now, where is he now? If you Google Terry T or or why clue? C l u n e. 

Brandon: 

He is worth probably an estimated 500 to 600 million and dollars. He has the 1000 employees. He’s a success of entrepreneurs, anything he puts his hand to. 

Brandon: 

And I’m not saying that this is about the money. This is about the concentration. He had it natural. I had to develop mine. You will have some of your entrepreneurs who are listening here. 

Brandon: 

And I am saying that there is absolutely no way that they will succeed in the business environment unless they have the capacity of the mind on unless they have good sleep on. Unless they have the ability to handle stress, stress is perceived. 

Brandon: 

It’s not the event it cause of stress. 

Brandon: 

And again, another story from the book. I was a dishwasher in Uppsala University in Sweden. It was a very expensive country. 

Brandon: 

I was I was at the university in Sweden was really expensive for one year during a Rasmus. So I went and worked as a dishwasher in an Irish pub, not at the university person Irish pub. And I remember two chefs would come in and one chef there were both the same age and boat of the same. 

Brandon: 

Trading on one chef would get all of the orders, and he was absolutely focused on. He was able to deliver the meals and there weren’t complaints coming and everything was pretty good. 

Brandon: 

You know, another chef would come in with the same amount of orders on he’d be all over the place. He wasn’t able to focus because he got so wrapped up in his own mind that he didn’t have the focus and during what he was doing, because he was stuck in his head. But I was the second chef on. I remember. How is it that one guy can succeed and you’re a guy? Couldn’t they were both the same age. There were both males and they had both the same training. Now, this is something that entrepreneurs need is the ability to handle stress. And for me, the Brett was in the Nate part of that, because I by focusing on my breathing over, say, 20 years, and it didn’t take me 20 years. 

Brandon: 

But I’ve been utilizing for 20 years by focusing on my breath. 

Brandon: 

It’s almost a part of the brain develops on any time that I want to bring myself into the present moment. 

Brandon: 

I bring my attention automatically to the back of the head, and I can replicate that. And that’s the flow. Psychologists, sports psychologists will say that it’s the most cover the thing that you can’t. You can’t replicate the flow, and I would say, Yes, you can. You can bring yourself into promo present moment awareness, but it doesn’t happen during one session. This is something that you gently built up over time. And, of course I’m not saying that my mind is tortoise still all the time. Of course it’s not. My mind is Stiller than what it waas. But my capacity to concentrate now on a 46 years of age is immeasurably better than when I was 16. My sleep is better. My creative and intuition is better because creativity happens. Fresh and original thinking happens when there’s a gap between thoughts, not when the mind is active. How many times have we tried to solve a problem? And we try to solve it by thinking and thinking and thinking and thinking and thinking? 

Brandon: 

Listen, the mind has to give, have arrest and we have to, you know, to quite in the minds to allow the possible solutions to emerge. 

Brandon: 

Yeah, I just say yes to all of that I I use. I’m just sitting here thinking, as you’re saying, No, that’s how I apply this to my life and how students I can hear that stress and how they could just manage that. Some people used to say, and I started to lift more weights recently because I got back into it because I didn’t have as much time to be quite honest from last year and 1/2 from working right. 

Patrick: 

But I think it has affected me as a usually ride my bike 10 to 15 hours a week, and people would say, Well, Brandon, that’s really a lot of hours. 

Patrick: 

Are you really working? 

Patrick: 

And my answer to them was, I get more work, more ideas on that bike because I’m focusing on my breath the entire time, which effectively means I can’t think about anything else. 

Patrick: 

And once you’ve done that, now there’s you other people could could do this same sort of exercise, maybe by sitting in the chair and focusing on their breath as you talk about in the book. 

Patrick: 

Even at night, I went on watching TV. 

Patrick: 

I do your breath exercises, which is I guess you call it breath Starvation. 

Patrick: 

Effectively? Yes. And the reason I do it is I really don’t have a lot of body fat, and I get cold. And that exercise warms you up, right? 

Patrick: 

Yes, yes, yes. You can often feel that your hands are getting warmer and the peripheral circulation like we’ve 70,000 miles of blood vessels in the body. You can open up your blood vessels by simply slowing down your breathing to the point of air starvation. 

Brandon: 

And it does work. I actually get that feeling of warmth through my whole body. Now I even recognize I don’t I don’t know if you know, but I am a psychologist. 

Patrick: 

I have a masters in psychology and studied it. And the thing that I even recognize in that is that I can feel what is effectively called hypnosis on coming because I’ve induced it into myself now unless you understand what those things are. 

Patrick: 

But I can. Soon as you start Golding and you start feeling that you effectively are putting yourself into hypnosis and it’s all done by breath. 

Patrick: 

 so it’s an incredible I mean, the power of this That’s so simple. Like this, right? Patrick, there’s no way we have to go buy a tool. We don’t have to do anything you can Look, you get somebody could literally start this right now. 

Patrick: 

Yeah, totally on. 

Patrick: 

If they were starting it right, allow, I would say to You know, Duris, treat the mansions to breathing. There’s the biochemistry is to biomechanics and cadence for the biochemistry. Simply pay attention to the Brexit comes into your body. 

Brandon: 

I’m breathing through the nose with the tongue and the roof from out on, really slow down the speed of their coming into your nose. So almost breeders. If you’re not breathing, don’t hold your breath. Don’t freeze your breathing, but really slow down. The speed of the brat is it comes into your nose, and that’s the top of the bread. Have a very relaxed and prolonged X elation. 

Brandon: 

The relaxed in prolonged X elation should be about 1.5 times the length of the inspiration. 

Brandon: 

So you’re having a very short so you’re having a very soft and slow breath in, and then you having a profound, relaxed X elation. 

Brandon: 

Because you’re breathing. 

Brandon: 

Volume is less than what it was before you started. You feel their hunger on air. Hunger signifies that carbon dioxide is increasing in the blood because ultimately that’s for causes. The air hunger, the air hunger and the increase to see or two in the blood I see or two increases your blood vessels dilate and your stars are getting more oxygen. 

Brandon: 

But also you activate this power sympathetic response in order to activate the bodies. 

Brandon: 

Parasympathetic response. 

Brandon: 

The X elation should be very slow and relaxed, and you’ll notice that with increased water, it’s live in your mouth when we get stressed or Michael’s dry and when we really slow down or breathing to air hunger, we’ve got increased water is live in the match, but I’ll say something else. 

Brandon: 

Mindfulness is wonderful, but there’s a tendency for the mind wander when you’re doing slow breathing with their hunger. 

Brandon: 

Your mind is more anchored onto the branch, so there’s something going on and I’m not sure is that because there’s increased blood flow and oxygen delivery to the brain, but also the very acts that you’re focusing on deliberately take obtaining air hunger. 

Brandon: 

The mind is naturally more anchored onto the breathing. 

Brandon: 

Now we tie that in much diaphragmatic breathing, which, of course, as I said that to die from his also connected with your emotions and then cadence, breathing, cadence, breathing. 

Brandon: 

We slow down the response rate to about six spreads from Inish, so we’re breathing in for about four seconds and we’re breathing out for about six seconds. 

Brandon: 

So that’s six spreads promoters. 

Brandon: 

What that does is it stimulates Beira receptors. 

Brandon: 

Richer pressure receptors inside the major blood vessels on the sensitivity of the bar receptors give a very good account of the functioning of the individuals. 

Brandon: 

Autonomic nervous system. 

Brandon: 

There’s a link between the Hartridge andare breathing, just a synchronicity there. 

Brandon: 

Basically, when we’re timing the heart rate, it’s called heart rate variability, and it’s the time between heartbeats. 

Brandon: 

Now, the relationship between our breathing on our heart rate is on the inspiration when we’re taking the breath in that sympathetic, the heart rate should be getting faster, and on the breath out, the heart rate should be slowing down. 

Brandon: 

So this is called respiratory Sinus arrhythmia. 

Brandon: 

On 200 years, therapists knew that this was beneficial. 

Brandon: 

At least it was some gauge of the autonomic nervous system, because individuals who were disturbed by stress they have reduced sensitivity of the bar receptors, individuals with anxiety with depression, with post traumatic stress disorder. 

Brandon: 

Their autonomic nervous system is not working the way it should do, and it’s by changing the breadth that we can have to stimulate ash. 

Brandon: 

But this is where all the researches is. 

Brandon: 

So you know, I didn’t include It’s in the oxygen advantage because most of my work for the previous years were diaphragmatic breathing and slow breathing. But getting the ultimate cadence to 5.5 or six breaths per minute. 

Brandon: 

The only it’s incredible, the myriad of research. 

Brandon: 

And there’s one article which you can send on to Brandon. 

Brandon: 

It’s cause slow breathing by Mark Russell, and he looks at the application of slow breathing in terms of overall human health, and it’s amazing what we can do to the Brett, you know, because sometimes people say to me like cognitive m therapy, they’re saying that when we’re teaching our patients cognitive therapy and I often ask patients were How do you wake up? 

Brandon: 

How do you feel when you wake up in the morning and the safe feelings Austen’s and I say, Well, as your as your counselor ever asked you about your sleep, they say no, because see, the emphasis on the counselor was is all about CBT. 

Brandon: 

Where is it’s like me with breathing. 

Brandon: 

For years I was looking at two or three different approaches, but now I’m just opening it up because the potential is from we’ve got more tools in our toolbox on this is the new one just taking in cadence, spreading it just opens up the potential that we Yeah, we were getting results anyway. Nose breathing, great start slow breathing. A great start read tolling a great start now cadence, breathing, Notre potential. 

Brandon: 

I love that. And on the one thing I was, I want to ask you on the cadence, breathing in your book. And maybe you’ve evolved that the technique since you stop at the bottom, just like yes, in animal. 

Patrick: 

Stop with the bottom. 

Patrick: 

Can you talk a little bit about that and why you do that? Cause I think it’s important and it’s we as humans air, always breathe in, Breathe out, breathe in, breathe out. 

Patrick: 

But that’s not really what we should be doing. 

Patrick: 

No. Does the natural pose following x elation? 

Brandon: 

So after we breathe in so basically, when we breathe in, we don’t breathe out so that the X elation will always follow the inhalation. And there’s no natural pause after an installation, So it would be very, very brief fraction of a second, pretty much no natural pause. So the cycle of the brightest inhalation going into a relaxed X elation during rest, and then a natural sensation of the breath before we have spree back in again. 

Brandon: 

However, the natural cessation is only present when the ball scores about Asian seconds. 

Brandon: 

So say, for instance, if you have somebody with inside your panic disorder. 

Brandon: 

These individuals have very fast upper chest breathing on stair. 

Brandon: 

Both scores probably down about 10 maybe 12 even 15 seconds, and also these individuals often have a very strong chemo sensitivity to carbon dioxide. 

Brandon: 

I have to be very careful working with people were panic disorder because just to stop sets. And if I have one subset to the slow reduce breathing with their hunger, I would actually bring them into such a stress response because they have an aversion to the feeling of suffocation. 

Brandon: 

Their entire history, involving panic attacks culminated with also feeling self occasions to the point that they thought they were going to die on. 

Brandon: 

I remember back in 2010 to 2013 I was doing Mindfulness Mitt functional breathing because I talked to to really give a great fish on. 

Brandon: 

I remembered there would be 20 rose to 30 year olds a lot of the time, predominantly female and Madonna, where the males were if the mayor’s weren’t turning up for breathing or training predominantly female. 

Brandon: 

But you would see some of the kids that when they were slowing down their breathing that they were going pale with fresh and I, in my wisdom at the time, naively, I tell them to keep going bullish. 

Brandon: 

Where is now? I realize air hunger for most people is uncomfortable, but air hunger for somebody who’s prone to panic disorder they can think they’re going to die. 

Brandon: 

So here is where we have to with some individuals that when they’re during really slow life breathing, if the air hunger gets a little bit too much or if you feel stressed, just take a rest. 

Brandon: 

So I always now give a teaspoon of air hunger to individuals prone to panic disorder. 

Brandon: 

Why? 

Brandon: 

Because I want to reduce this suffocation. 

Brandon: 

I want to reduce their bodies reaction to suffocation. And I do that by giving them a little teaspoon of suffocation. 

Brandon: 

Because if they have a strong chemo sensitivity to carbon dioxide buildup, it means that they have that aversion to suffocation. 

Brandon: 

They have got fast upper chest breathing, and it’s keeping them in that stage off. 

Brandon: 

You know, like it’s it’s not. The event that puts them into the panic attack is there Every day breathing is off. They don’t have the caution to be able to cope with the stresses are little little shocks that life throws at us like driving the car to put somebody into panic attack. Going into a crowded environment. I want to improve the person’s resilience on we can do that by the bread from a biochemical point of view, but also probably from a cadence point of view. And so it’s very interesting that we have to tailor the exercises, then just different groups and even subgroups within populations. 

Brandon: 

Yeah, I could I can see how you would do that. Now, does this exercise carry over into what? Will it become automatic? 

Patrick: 

Would it lower my breath rate at night? Cause right now my breath rate, like when I don’t eat before or if I eat after seven and I’m seeing 17 breaths a minute, which is I don’t know where that falls on the spectrum, but for me, that’s where it sits. If I don’t eat, I can see 14 issue, you know? So I see that difference. If we practice these exercises that you’re talking about, does that carry over into this? It does. 

Patrick: 

Yes. As the board score increases, the response rate naturally decreases. 

Brandon: 

 so we would expect of specific response rate forgiven. Both. Score Andi typically for, say, somebody who’s breathing. If they’re bored. Scores typically about 2020 seconds, we were typically expect him to have about 14 16 breaths, but if they increased the 30 seconds there were Sparta rate will come down to typically about 10 to 12. 

Brandon: 

Threats were hand 40 seconds. You’re talking, say, about 68 10 breaths. 

Brandon: 

Well, that’s so the board scored those. 

Patrick: 

You know, you’re working as a psychologist. you if you look at the next clients of committee and just watched our breathing people coming in with anxiety and panic disorder, it’s really you know, that the respiration, I would say escaping them stuck in that fight or flight on this is where would be very interesting. 

Brandon: 

Even the cadence breathing of six spreads permission. 

Brandon: 

This will be in your apostasy stick that we’re practicing a breathing technique that even when we don’t practice it, that the benefits carried true that there’s noone Europe, part ways in the brain. And typically we have to be doing something for about 60 to 70 days from Europe. Last tested to kick in. 

Brandon: 

Yeah, I I don’t practice psychology, but I feel like I do with the entrepreneurs because quite frankly, have probably in practicing that way. But entrepreneurs air coming in there trying to either make a career transition or just start a company and and what I tell entrepreneurs is Is that you? 

Patrick: 

This is not This is not just about me teaching you how to build a business plan. 

Patrick: 

It’s not just about me teaching you how to build your financial plan. We can do that. It’s a challenge, for sure, but I can teach you that and with good certainty, know that you can perform that. 

Patrick: 

But if you don’t have your mind in your body, which you know breathing effects both your mind and your body, you will not be able to do this and effectively, especially if you are bootstrapping. 

Patrick: 

Accompany. 

Patrick: 

Entrepreneurs are when I first started mine, and I’m sure it sounds like you did the same thing. You know you’re going to school. You’re working at night. 

Patrick: 

Yes, I was going to school, working on a spinach farm and building a company. 

Patrick: 

Yes, that’s that. 

Patrick: 

I mean, that’s insane. 

Patrick: 

And entrepreneurs are doing that. You’re they’re bootstrapping their company at night, and if you want to do that, you’ve got to take care of your your mind in your body. 

Patrick: 

And this breathing here exercise effectively is I don’t want to say it’s a magic wand cause there’s no one magic wand. 

Patrick: 

There’s a combination of things. But just to be able to use this tool could increase their output. Productivity, their creativeness exponentially. Right? 

Patrick: 

Patrick? 

Brandon: 

Well, I use this and I became self employed when I was 26 years of age. 

Brandon: 

I’m 46th on 20 years in business on it’s been very successful on I went into an industry that would have Bean totally madness. Nobody would ever recommend to go into a breeding industry, especially going back to 1 4002 Now it’s harsh. So now it’s a different story. and I’m booked up for the next completely for 2020 and already today have refused to events in 2021 on. I said to them, I have to devote more time to family to get that bounds, but I’ll say this when I come out of university. 

Brandon: 

I hated my job and I was working for a US multinational at the time on a hated distress that the multinational put on me and I had to put it under staff underneath me. 

Brandon: 

But it was the best thing ever did. 

Brandon: 

I hated my job. 

Brandon: 

The number one was I still gave it 100% and I gave it 100% because I often taught us I’m not necessarily working for the multinational. 

Brandon: 

Yes, they pay me. I’m working for myself here because I’m using the time from 26 27 28 or whatever. No is actually from before that. 22 23 24 25. I’m using this time to invest in myself. 

Brandon: 

And I would put myself out there to the maximum of my ability, because whatever happens in the future, I’m building my own on harnessing my own skills. But also the fact that I hated my job give me a grayish resourcefulness to take the risk, to go out working for myself, and I have never looked back. It was absolutely one of the best decisions that I’ve ever made. We need creative freedom, and we need financial freedom, and you’ve got much better chance of that happening when you’re working for yourself and not working for everybody else. Now I granted, it’s not going to apply to everybody. You have to work hard. You have to be prepared to put in the time it’s not gonna happen overnight. In actual fact, from 2002 until probably 2010 even 2012 for me. 

Brandon: 

I was making a living from it, but it was a very slow trajectory. I was just one person I’m from 2013 to 2019. 

Brandon: 

It took off and it literally took off like a boat. And that’s that’s the way itself, you know? The other thing is that say is get into a company or a service that you absolutely love to dio, because I’ve found a job that I love too Dio I found a field of work to they love to do. It can make a difference. It’s very rewarding, but emotionally and of course financially is important. 

Brandon: 

But I would never want to be in a stressful job just for the sake of money, because ultimately it is. It’s about happiness. On money is not going to buy that. And that’s not just a cliche. I wanted to have a workplace that we can be challenged. We can be creative weaken, draw the best out of ourselves on If you can produce good products, then naturally, the finance look after itself. 

Brandon: 

Yeah, I didn’t even pay you to say that. So I appreciate you sharing about your business. Well, your expertise is on the oxygen breathing and the Action Advantage program. But I am really grateful for you sharing that with our listeners because I think it’s important that people here that you just didn’t write a book and get famous. 

Patrick: 

No, no, no. 

Patrick: 

Yeah. As one guy said to me, he said it took your 10 years to be an overnight success. 

Brandon: 

Yeah, exactly. And people say that, but they don’t quite understand that. And you are now known around the world. And I’m so grateful for you coming on. I want to ask you because we’ve taken a ton of your time. And I know you’re super busy over the holidays, and I’m really grateful for you making this time and sharing all of this is one thing that I,that I think would benefit our listeners. And I think everybody does this. And this is as it relates to sign. So you always here and and I’m saying this I have an incredible life. 

Patrick: 

We’ve been together for 23 years and I’m grateful for her because, as I’m sure your wife knows being married to an entrepreneur is and not not not not an easy road. 

Patrick: 

It’s a tough road and you go through a lot of things. 

Patrick: 

And, I’m really grateful for her. One of the things I said to her, I said, Listen, I got this book and I’m going to be talking to Patrick And in the book, he talks about sighing and that you should hold your breath afterwards. 

Patrick: 

And what I’m trying to do here, Patrick is just give our listeners a little tool that they can use even to improve that. 

Patrick: 

And as I read in your book, when I read that, I started noticing everybody. 

Patrick: 

I mean, I’m talking to students in there. 

Patrick: 

It drives me crazy male, probably a little of my O. C D in my head. I’m like, Stop sign, Stop doing that. You are creating this. 

Patrick: 

This physical response that you don’t even realize is making that stressful situation that you’re having worse. So can you touch? Talk about a tool that when people say I you talk about that in your book a little bit? 

Patrick: 

Sure, like some commentators in terms of breathing said, it’s very normal to sigh frequently. Try today I totally disagree with them if I see people coming in with anxiety and panic disorder. 

Brandon: 

And if I are not even that if I see somebody who is coming in a normal individual and if I see them that they’re signing a LA SH under court for Brett and they’re feeling air hunger, I actually often it gives me a red flag that they have a susceptibility to anxiety or panic disorder. 

Brandon: 

Even if they haven’t Bean diagnosed with us on. 

Brandon: 

You know, I work in groups of people. I’m we kind of 30 people, and I’m watching 30 people in the group, and we don’t typically always seeing sighing. 

Brandon: 

So here’s 30 individuals who would be breathing trains. They don’t side. 

Brandon: 

So, you know, sighing is not a normal thing for human beings to be doing frequently. Once I every now and again no problem. Frequent sighing, not a good son because it keeps the stocking up Breathing pattern, I would say, is if you’re noticing that you’re signing a lot of practice to get up your boat score, get your mouth close. 

Brandon: 

Do slow, reduce breathing. But if you miss a sigh, so say, for example, you have a sigh and then you miss it. Then just simply breathe into your nose. Breathe out, pinch your nose and hold. 

Brandon: 

Let go. Breathe into your nose. So orders have hold your but for a few seconds. Then resume normal breathing. And that’s a farce. 

Brandon: 

Yeah, sure. That’ll reset the yes, the carbon dioxide that you’ve lost. 

Patrick: 

One single Big Brett gets rid of between seven and 16 millimeters of mercury Pressure Co two on every two millimeter, every one millimeter reduction. 

Brandon: 

Yep. Every one millimetre drop of sea or two reduces blood flow to the brain by 2%. So 7 to 16 millimeters is reducing blood flow to the brain by between 40 and 32% reducing blood flow to the brain. So we have to consider that Yeah. This I once I every now and again, no problem. Frequent sighing. Not good. 

Brandon: 

And And just breathe in. Breathe out. Hold your nose, reset it. 

Patrick: 

10 15 22nd Even 10 seconds is fine, because the person might even be able to hold their breath for 15 20 seconds. 

Patrick: 

Like going forward, I would say to people, Measure your boat score if you go to oxygen advantage dot com. You’ll see a description of the boat score there, the nose and blocking exercises, the maximum breathlessness test. That’s also a good test. But don’t do it of your pregnant or if you’ve got a cardiovascular issues or panic disorder, and because you don’t want to have a strong air hunger because it might just bring on some symptoms for you. 

Brandon: 

And, you know, like I think it would be really useful for you to start paying attention to breathing, slowing down your bread to the point of air hunger using your die from because you can tap into something that’s so in Asia in terms of the emotions, in terms of sleep and in terms of physical performance on the rock. Three. Coming together, mental and physical performance go together, sleep. The emotions on breathing go together. 

Brandon: 

Well, this is been incredible. I like to end on three H. 

Patrick: 

P. T s. I call high percentage tips comes from my fishing world, where we talk about high percentage spots. So I said, Hey, we’re going to high percentage tips. H Bt’s I feel like you’ve given so many tips. 

Patrick: 

Maybe it’s just a summary. Could I think we’ve covered a time. There’s a lot more in the book that I want to encourage everybody here to buy the oxygen advantage. I’ll put a link in the show notes to Patrick’s book. and you can reach him. Probably the best place is oxygen advantage dot com. Yes, to reach Patrick. Can you just Maybe it’s just a summary of very, uh, quick three h p t. 

Patrick: 

Store our listeners. 

Patrick: 

Yes, number one is Get your my clothes at night. 

Brandon: 

Never wake up with a dry mouth in the morning. 

Brandon: 

Number two Practice slowing down your breath are different. 

Brandon: 

Times drove today. 

Brandon: 

Don’t live stuck in your head. 

Brandon: 

Connect with your breathing by connecting with your breathing, your training your brain to be focused so that there could be three tips in Nashville. 

Brandon: 

Number one. 

Brandon: 

Never have your mouth close, so I never have your mouth open during sleep. Always breathe through your nose and you can. 

Brandon: 

You can take your I’m interrupting, but you can tape your mouth shut. 

Patrick: 

Rice myo tape. There’s lip CIO tape. You could go down to a campus. You just are drug store and just get paper. Three M paper tape and but never wake up with a dry, dry mouth in the morning. Number two don’t live stock in your heads. I spent 20 years stuck on my head on. If you’re living in your head, you’re missing on everything that’s around you. You see less. you know, and you just It’s just it’s a recipe for stress. So get your attention out of your head out of your mind onto your breathing And the third tip it would be when you have your attention on your breathing work on slowing it down to activate the body’s relaxation response. 

Brandon: 

Awesome. Thank you so much, Patrick. Again, everybody. The oxygen advantage for those looking, you can see the book. 

Patrick: 

You are on Amazon, right? Yes. Probably has a place for people to check you out. Patrick also teaches courses online at the oxygen advantage dot Coms. That right? Patrick it? What’s the schedule is like for 2020 for people who are interested, s So we have one at the end of January. 

Patrick: 

So it’s to 29 to January and it’s a to our training. 

Brandon: 

Basically, people, they all come in online for your zoom the way we’re doing it now. So it’s live on this, generally a small group of people. So I’m going from one person to the next, giving them points. But im It’s a guided breathing technique. So I guide people true about eight or nine different breathing exercises. And then I give him two to our recording afterwards, and the cost is $95 for the entire lash. 

Brandon: 

Ah, that that that’s an incredible deal. I must tell you that’s too cheap, because I would tell listeners it will change your life. Ah, you will, just to be able to focus more and have more energy and wake up feeling refreshed and have Patrick’s one a one. 

Patrick: 

I think back in those early years that you talked about. That was probably pretty easy when you first started, but getting one on one. My Patrick now is super hard, so having the ability to and not because I communicated with Attic over a few weeks on, actually on Instagram and that and then on email to know that he cares about each and every one of his people that he trains. But just been this year popularity. It’s really hard, so to have the opportunity to jump even on a zoom unless you’re gonna fly to Ireland. Which I guess maybe you could write acts right off. to get on there and have that one on one. Coaching is just huge. So that will be at the end of January. And then and then, is there any other training that they can get in person or is pretty much booked up for? 

Patrick: 

Yeah, we’ve got training into the dates are booked out and we’ve got training for a difference in different countries. Start the world. 

Brandon: 

I’m training in the States next year in Santa Monica and March 4 city in Seattle Infirmary, Australian March, Japan, UK. 

Brandon: 

It’s money, money trips around the world. 

Brandon: 

I’ve got 25 gigs booked up. 

Brandon: 

Good Lord people sign up for those or those s o some of the mark v oxygen advantage dot com. 

Brandon: 

Okay, And then understand, Herb, you tickle clinic dot com you take a clinic is really the health aspect of us on oxygen advantages, more sports resilience and concentration. 

Patrick: 

Ok, well, great. 

Patrick: 

We’ll put all of this in the show notes again. 

Brandon: 

Patrick, thank you so much. Have a great holiday season. Thanks for taking such a long time and fitting this into your schedule. 

Patrick: 

I know everybody’s gonna love it. 

Patrick: 

Great. Thanks very much, friend. 

Brandon: 

Thanks, man. That was absolutely incredible. 

Patrick: 

Grace. Grace. Yeah, We got true a lot of stuff, so it worked out. 

Brandon: 

Yes. So my plan is we will. 

Patrick: 

We’ll get this podcast up. I’m gonna have to record an intro and outro try to do that. Teoh tomorrow. Probably. Your, going to see Star Wars today and then stuff and then we’ll get it out. 

Patrick: 

I’ll let you know when it’s out. If you send it and promote it, I will transcribe it. I’ll give you the transcription if you want it. 

Patrick: 

 we create a block post that is search engine optimized. I’ll put your book on there and links to your website and then the YouTube channel. Probably after the first of the year. 

Patrick: 

Yeah, that’s accent. And yeah, like we would promote on instagram. And so should we. Don’t have some money following. I think we’ve eight or 9000 analysts from We only kind of started last year. Are you sure? 2019 and we’ve got YouTube, but so facebook or whatever. So Yeah, whatever way we can promote, it will put right there as well. 

Brandon: 

Yeah. Do you have an email list? 

Patrick: 

And we’re so bad. Brandon, we have an email list, but we don’t. We haven’t sent newsletter. Were just a moment or, uh, all the it advice that you given. 

Brandon: 

You have to consider me an expert in social media. Is I? I highly recommend that you get your email list. I will tell you, Patrick, you will print money off of that because Okay, Yeah, you’ve got to get. And if you want help after the holiday or whenever you want, you just you need oh, and say, Hey, man, and I want you to help me set it up. And I will do that for you, for free for No, I’ll show you how did how I want it. 

Patrick: 

Oh, because yeah, You want to be collecting those emails people buy from you forever? 

Patrick: 

Great. Yep. That would be super accent. I’ve just said a visitor arrived, so it’s OK. 

Brandon: 

Yeah. 

Patrick: 

All right, Patrick. Well, thank you so much. I’ll be in touch and I’ll let you know when we’re gonna get this out. Have a great holiday. Thanks to you too. 

Patrick: 

Thanks very much. 

Brandon: 

Bye

Subscribe to the Build a Business with Brandon Podcast on your podcast player below

Build a Business with Brandon Podcast Homepage